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Quantity vs. Quality

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posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 12:36 PM
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Ah, yes. When will they learn.


The Calories in vs. Calories out (quantity) concept takes a back seat to the Carbohydrates vs. Fat concept (quality).

Cutting Carbs Is More Effective Than Low-Fat Diet for Insulin-Resistant Women, Study Finds


Obese women with insulin resistance lose more weight after three months on a lower-carbohydrate diet than on a traditional low-fat diet with the same number of calories, according to a new study.


This has been demonstrated multiple times in lab animals and in human subjects......multiple times. And yet....


"The typical diet that physicians recommend for weight loss is a low-fat diet,"


WHY?????


People with insulin resistance, a common precursor for Type 2 diabetes, metabolize carbohydrates, or "carbs," abnormally, which may affect their rate of weight loss. For them, Plodkowski said, "the lower-carb diet is more effective, at least in the short term."


It's simple, really. Individuals with Insulin Resistance(IR) metabolize carbohydrates differently because of hyperinsulinemia, or elevated insulin levels. By restricting carbs, insulin levels are lowered, thereby releasing fat from adipocytes (fat cells).

There's really nothing abnormal about this process. And considering that most overweight individuals are Insulin Resistant to some degree, it's safe to assume that ANYONE looking to drop fat will benefit more from a low-carb diet than from a low-fat diet, regardless of total caloric intake.

-Dev




posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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That actually makes sence to me.
Flagged and starred.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 01:26 PM
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Of course, regular exercise jump starts the metabolism and helps get things back on track too. You can't simply eat the right foods and hope to be fit...especially if you are already at the disadvantage of being overweight.

In regards to consuming fat over carbohydrates, it is also important to eat the right kinds of fat.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 01:28 PM
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And especially to cut the really bad carbs out first, such as white breads, white pasta, white rice. These kind of carbs have very little fiber, and really just turn into sugar for a diabetic. Or someone who has too much belly fat, which usually means insulin resistant.

For the person who doesn't want to completely cut out breads, pastas, and rice, just changing these items to whole grains, and brown or wild rice, and cut the serving portion in half, it will make a tremendous difference while learning about the glycemic index of other carbs.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
And especially to cut the really bad carbs out first, such as white breads, white pasta, white rice. These kind of carbs have very little fiber, and really just turn into sugar for a diabetic. Or someone who has too much belly fat, which usually means insulin resistant.

For the person who doesn't want to completely cut out breads, pastas, and rice, just changing these items to whole grains, and brown or wild rice, and cut the serving portion in half, it will make a tremendous difference while learning about the glycemic index of other carbs.


This is true as well! It took me quite the effort, but the ONLY carbs I consume now are brown rice and raw oatmeal. Once I began consuming only complex carbohydrates, I could feel my energy level pick up considerably. I will never go back to my childish eating habits (I call them childish because that is when I learned to eat nutrient poor foods).



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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I am not diabetic and not over weight - I do have hypoclycemia. When my sugar gets too low and I am on the verge of an attack white rice or white bread does wonders for me. I have found a glass of orange juice followed by rice or bread to work the best. Diabetes does run in my family, am I doing the wrong thing for my hypoglycemia?



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


I was hypoglycemic for the last 10 or more years. Two months ago, I was diagnosed with type II adult onset diabetes. Now is the best time to change your eating habits. Switch to whole grains and make sure you get plenty of exercise. I eat more raw fruits and veggies now too. I would say include fish at least twice a week, but with things in the gulf, I no longer eat any type of seafood.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
Of course, regular exercise jump starts the metabolism and helps get things back on track too. You can't simply eat the right foods and hope to be fit...especially if you are already at the disadvantage of being overweight.


Not necessarily. Exercising makes us eat more. Our bodies are like thermostats; if you burn more calories than you take in, your body will compensate by increasing hunger.

It really depends on the type of exercise. If it's simply walking, jogging or steady state cardio....it's pointless (metabolically speaking). You're "metabolism" may jumpstart but so will hunger. If, however, you do interval training or weight training...you will improve insulin sensitivity, thereby reducing insulin levels and allowing fat from adipocytes to be burned as fuel.

Honestly, if you're obese, diet should be the number one modification. Too often, individuals reward themselves when they workout a lot....mainly because they're hungry and intense workouts cause carb cravings (especially in insulin resistant individuals).


In regards to consuming fat over carbohydrates, it is also important to eat the right kinds of fat.


Stick to saturated and monounsaturated. Most polyunsaturates, specifically omega 6's, promote inflammation which is strongly associated with obesity.

-Dev



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


I do interval training. I can honestly say that I eat less on days that I workout. Also, on days I do not work out, I have an unconscious craving for carbs...the bad carbs....and tons of them.

Maybe it's a simple matter of wearing myself out through the interval training that causes me to eat less....maybe I just don't have the energy to cook/eat afterward. Although I seem to have plenty of energy for other activities after workouts.

In regards to obese folks; absolutely, diet is of highest importance. But, to say exercise makes one eat more...I believe that is a cop-out excuse that people use to avoid exercise....after all, they are already sacrificing by giving up junk food!

there is a term I use "skinny fat"....someone who is thin, but in poor physical/cardiovascular condition. Those are the ones who eat well, but their body is soft from lack of physical exertion. These are the people that, on occasion, drop dead and everyone says "I can't believe he/she had a heart attack, they took such good care of their body".

All in all, I suppose it's better to eat healthy and skip the exercise than it is to eat bad and not exercise. I guess it just depends on one's desired results. However, if you are borderline diabetic, or if diabetes runs in the family, I wouldn't count on diet alone.

These are just my observations and opinions based upon many years of tooling around with my diet and exercise regime. I have been all over the place, but once I put some good science behind my efforts then I finally zeroed in the strategy that works best for me..."BEST FOR ME" is key, as no two people are alike and no one can follow a generic formula to achieve success at their optimum desired level.

EDIT:

I Googled "Skinny Fat" since I had never actually looked that up before. Turns out, there are others that use that phrase. Here is a decent article regarding "Skinny Fat":

stronglifts.com...

[edit on 25-6-2010 by Aggie Man]



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


I do interval training. I can honestly say that I eat less on days that I workout. Also, on days I do not work out, I have an unconscious craving for carbs...the bad carbs....and tons of them.

Maybe it's a simple matter of wearing myself out through the interval training that causes me to eat less....maybe I just don't have the energy to cook/eat afterward. Although I seem to have plenty of energy for other activities after workouts.


That makes sense. When you interval train, you'll burn the majority of your calories for 48 hours AFTER the workout. It's called Excessive Post-workout Oxygen Consumption (EPOC).


In regards to obese folks; absolutely, diet is of highest importance. But, to say exercise makes one eat more...I believe that is a cop-out excuse that people use to avoid exercise....after all, they are already sacrificing by giving up junk food!


I don't consider it a cop-out; I consider it a biological fact. Dieting or exercising to a point of caloric defecit will lead to hunger and increased food consumption. Sure, others may use this as an excuse.

Why would someone use an excuse to avoid exercise? Because they're lazy? Well, it's quite evident that they're lazy because they are overweight and hyperinsulinemic, not the other way around. Undereating, dieting, will make on lethargic to conserve energy. And we see that obese individuals are almost always trying some sort of diet. Sooooo...get them to eat MORE of the RIGHT foods and they will be "unlazy".


However, if you are borderline diabetic, or if diabetes runs in the family, I wouldn't count on diet alone.


I would.



These are just my observations and opinions based upon many years of tooling around with my diet and exercise regime. I have been all over the place, but once I put some good science behind my efforts then I finally zeroed in the strategy that works best for me..."BEST FOR ME" is key, as no two people are alike and no one can follow a generic formula to achieve success at their optimum desired level.


Thank you. This is, essentially, a disclaimer. One that states that your experiences may not reflect typically. It's good you recognize this, as others tend to believe that their own experience somehow turns them into a health guru.

Yeah, I've heard skinny-fat before. I've always thought of it as being a person that looks skinny with clothes on, but upon further review is quite flabby. Wanna see some skinny-fat dudes/chicks....go watch a marathon. Most of the time, this body type is a result of exercising without dieting properly (from what I've observed). I used to be that guy.

-Dev

[edit on 25-6-2010 by DevolutionEvolvd]



posted on Jul, 6 2010 @ 01:41 AM
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Well Im not a fatty boom sticks but I wanted to shift some unwanted love handles and my roundish bottom.

I did the low fat thing for years, switched to Devos advice, and it literally flew off.
He took me through the whole Carbs and insulin thing, and once you understand it, it really is amazing how much your body likes real fats, and not processed foods or carbs.

the only carbs i eat now are in fruit and veges daily


My sister and mama are all on the Devo Diet, and have also found for the first time since their 20s weight actually shifting, mum is diabetic and in her 70s.



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