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What would cause the water to fizz/bubble like this

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posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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Here is a video that has me a little perplexed, could this be caused by the gases or the dispersant like corexit?

www.youtube.com...



Can anyone enlighten me?




[edit on 24-6-2010 by Seraphina]




posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:12 AM
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I think what you may be seeing is the methane gas dissolving in the seawater.
at least i'm fairly certain, but if anybody else has any ideas let's hear 'em!



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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I can't really see anything unusual in the video; it looks like a typical wave breaking at the shore line. That said, the video is of rather low quality and I wouldn't discount the possibility. Just saying, I'm not seeing it.

If anything, its probably the dispersant. The oil is bad enough, but that stuff...

[edit on 24-6-2010 by vor78]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:19 AM
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Foam fractionation. If you know anyone with a salt water fish tank they can tell you all about it. The dissolved organic compounds in the water --- from the dissolved oil as well as the breakdown of dead phyto and zooplankton --- create alot of dissolved organics. This will create alot of fiz/foam due to the surf action. It's one way the ocean cleans itself.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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reply to post by vor78
 


I'm planning a trip out there with my camera later in the afternoon and I'll try to document what I can.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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"When the concentration of methane gets high enough to be interesting it fizzes out like Alka Seltzer."

Info from oceanographers 2002 probes in Gulf:
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Seraphina
I'm planning a trip out there with my camera later in the afternoon and I'll try to document what I can.


Higher quality video would be helpful. If possible, it would also be interesting to know how much oil is leeching into the sand. Some of it certainly is, but the consistency of that stuff looks like axle grease.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by Seraphina
 


Looks like a sodium chemical reaction to some other mineral??
2nd



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:55 AM
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From what I understand there is more oil buried under the sand than what you actually see, I'll be checking into that also.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:14 AM
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Bad - this acid video shows situation is much more than bad... I have follow oil disaster from day one - and this video is most horrible from all. This video really should link with another video from same, I think taken same day to understand the magnitute of this... Acid gases will overtake Florida fast.

People of the coasts affected, leave - evacuate your selfs now!



[edit on 24-6-2010 by JanusFIN]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Seraphina
 

Please embed the video to beginning and change tittle to this thread as video says it is... You have the right to op this issue, and its very important - so please, edit it straight.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Seraphina
 

Please embed the video to beginning and change tittle to this thread as video says it is... You have the right to op this issue, and its very important - so please, edit it straight.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:21 AM
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LOL! The other thread title was "Surf on Pensacola Beach Boiling like Acid"

A little dramatic I would say. I can't see the video, but I can say that the water is often foamy at the beach. It comes and it goes. Sometimes the foam even forms a merangue quality like pie topping, and it hangs around for a few days.

Since I can't see the video, I don't know if that is the case, but I really don't think "boiling acid" is a major concern here. The Gulf Disaster is dire and requires no need for further speculation or exaggeration, it is already a disaster of epic proportions, and if the relief wells are not successful it will be a disaster of entirely unprecedented and world changing proportion!



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 

You are right, and this video should alarm also our members from the area to check out this much closer...

Damn media blackout.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by mpriebe81
 


You could be very right. There are reports coming out today that researchers have measured the Methane and it is bad. In some spots it is 1 million times higher then it should be. As opposed to the 40% reported a week or so ago. So there is a TON of methane being released from the well.

It could also just be foamy oil. There is a lot of churning action in the sea.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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Most probably methane...some tests have shown there's 1 million times the normal amount in the water.

For detailed info on the methane go here:

Gulf spill: is the methane a bigger problem than the oil?

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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This is just sickening, My family loves going down to Florida on spring break, is anyone on ATS near sanibel or Pine Island. Has it reached there yet??



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Seraphina
 


Ya know it'sd not just oil you get out of a well...
there pretty dirty and you get all kinds of gases mixed in any number of tham will fizz
methane h2s, co2 no2 the list is almost endless..



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


If its methane, that's not good at all. At all. Diffusion would tend to equalize the concentrations of methane in the water, I would think, so if you've got a huge concentration of methane that far away in Florida, you should have a similar concentration of methane *anywhere* along the same outer radius of distance from the source of the leak.

Considering the sheer volume of methane it would require to change the Gulf composition even one part per million, I'm still very, very, very skeptical, but I can't rule it out, either. If it is methane and its not some type of bizarre anomaly that the concentrations could be that high at that distance, it would seem to me that we are totally, utterly and completely screwed.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by vor78
 


Over ten BILLION cubic feet of methane have been released so far that we know, just from the broken wellhead. That doesn't count what is sublimating out of the methane hydrates, or what is leaking from fractures in the seafloor near the BOP.

I've been concerned about it since very early on.

Check the references in the thread I posted: it is frightening, but I'd rather know and be frightened than not know and be surprised.



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