It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tropical Storm headed towards Florida (not Alex)

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:33 PM
link   
Not trying to alarm anyone, but I just caught this vid and wanted to post it to let people know about gulf developments.
"http://www.youtube.com/v/WreG51fJ4g0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385">" target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">TheWeatherspace.com

OK, my video embed skills are kinda bad. You can find it on theweatherspace.com

[edit on 23-6-2010 by OuttaTime]

edit to change title. It's not Agatha, but it isn't Alex either.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by OuttaTime]




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:36 PM
link   
Tropical storm Agatha occurred at the end of May. It no longer exists.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:40 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


lol nice catch.

There is an unorganized storm inching towards the gulf. Only a 30% chance of forming a tropical cyclone at this point though.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:41 PM
link   
Maybe you are thinking about this tropical depression hanging out over Jamaica at the moment

30% of becoming a tropical storm in the next 48 hours.

NOAA



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:47 PM
link   
reply to post by JakiusFogg
 


It's not even a depression. A slight trough maybe
www.intellicast.com...

[edit on 6/23/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:51 PM
link   
Hmmm, that is just bizarre. I just checked their websiteand clicked on Hurricane News and it shows this :




Forecasters are keeping an eye near the Yucatan Peninsula as an area of strong thunderstorms has formed.
Computer models bring this area of storms and associated surface low pressure center into the Gulf Of Mexico within a week.

As the storm nears, the National Hurricane Center has stated that they will issue the proper warnings if needed.

Some forecasters at the center have told TheWeatherSpace.com that they fully expect the area to develop within the next few days after it crosses over the peninsula.



I'm guessing Agatha is our first TS of the Atlantic.
I checked NHC and saw one off of cuba, but this apparently is a system of thunderstorms moving toward the gulf from S America



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Ya it is INVEST 93L, and it has been discussed at length in this thread:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Alex will be the name if it develops, but so far it has only weakened.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:54 PM
link   
What happened to Alex? I swear Alex was around here somewhere...

oops...typed to slow...

[edit on 23-6-2010 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
Tropical storm Agatha occurred at the end of May. It no longer exists.
en.wikipedia.org...


Ahh, Tropoical Cyclone. Those are Pacific disturbances with a differnt list of names. How ironic they would use the same name for an Atlantic storm as well.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:57 PM
link   
reply to post by OuttaTime
 

No. The first Atlantic storm will be called Alex.
geography.about.com...

I suggest you look for another source for your weather forecasts.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by ~Lucidity
What happened to Alex? I swear Alex was around here somewhere...

oops...typed to slow...

[edit on 23-6-2010 by ~Lucidity]

Yep, you're right. Alex would be the first 2010 Atlantic name. I wonder why that weatherguy refereed to it as Agatha, unless it is a redeveloping remnant of Agatha itself. In which case, they will have to rename it. Wow, that's confusing



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:58 PM
link   
[edit on 23-6-2010 by HunkaHunka]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by OuttaTime
 

No. The first Atlantic storm will be called Alex.
geography.about.com...

I suggest you look for another source for your weather forecasts.


I was writing that exact same thing to Lucidity when you responded. And we both checked the exact same link at the same time
My mistake. It struck me as odd too, but it would seem that there is something that the NHC is monitoring, but not commenting on yet.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


I would certainly call it more than a slight trough with current millibars at 1008 - 1012 around the Caribbean sea.

Anyway there plenty of time for it to grow nicely, and build up it's strength in time to take aim at the gulf. IF the winds are right

Jeppesen



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:08 PM
link   
reply to post by OuttaTime
 

deleted due to not reading context of post correctly/

[edit on 23/6/2010 by JakiusFogg]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:15 PM
link   
Found a map of the current Gulf radar and it showing the system they are looking at, and it seems to be preceeding Alex. Nothing big, but worth keeping a small eye on. Anything coming from that direction would surely push a bunch of oil towards the Florida coast.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:15 PM
link   
odd. 1 click, 2 posts...

[edit on 23-6-2010 by OuttaTime]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:24 PM
link   
reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Alex has yet to be born yet Lucidity..........Its just an unorganized void of energy at the moment..........But dont worry Alex will be born in the very near future in some water near by and I am sure it will be line for the gulf.......



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:38 PM
link   
reply to post by JakiusFogg
 

You are looking a forecast chart, not a surface analysis.

What matters is not the pressure at a particular location but how low it is in comparison to the surrounding region. 1008-1012 millibars is not low pressure (standard surface pressure is considered to be 1000 mb). What matters is the difference in pressure between two areas. The greater the pressure gradient the more intense the storm. What you are looking for is the isobars to be close together (like a hole or a sharp bump into a higher pressure area).

We do not see that in the chart you linked or in the surface analysis of the region.
www.fnmoc.navy.mil...
In fact, the analysis shows slight high pressure ridge ( that dip in the 1016 line) over Hispaniola. There really is not much pressure gradient indicated in the either the Caribbean or the Gulf.

Now, those isobars are not all based on actual barometer readings so there could be a low pressure area there somewhere, but the chart does not show it and it does not require a depression for there to be "disturbed weather".

Of course, it could change.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:40 PM
link   
reply to post by OuttaTime
 


That is an infrared satellite image, not radar. It's showing us clouds.

And, as has been pointed out, Alex does not exist as yet. There is no tropical storm or any other organized weather...yet.

[edit on 6/23/2010 by Phage]



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join