It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Oldest Skeleton of Lucy's Species Unveiled

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:18 PM
link   

Oldest Skeleton of Lucy's Species Unveiled


news.sciencemag.org

Researchers have unveiled the second oldest skeleton of a possible human ancestor, a 3.6-million-year-old male of the species Australopithecus afarensis. The roughly 40% complete skeleton has been nicknamed Kadanuumuu, which means "big man" in the Afar language of the Afar Depression of Ethiopia where it was found. "It was huge—a big man, with long legs," says lead author Yohannes Haile-Selassie, a paleoanthropologist at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History in Ohio.


(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:18 PM
link   


This was an incredible find and now that it has been unveiled so that more scientists can study it, we just may find that "missing link". Apparently, scientists are saying that this guy walked upright, just like you and I, yet he's almost a half million years older than our beloved Lucy (with a few extra parts too). Another thing that's interesting, is that he seems to be more gorilla and human-like than chimpanzee-like, throwing out the once accepted theory that our last common ancestor who shared traits between hominins and other chimpanzees, didn't look like chimpanzees. Could Kadanuumuu answer a lot of questions in our quest to find the "missing link" or will he just spawn more questions than answers?

--airspoon


news.sciencemag.org
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 23-6-2010 by airspoon]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:20 PM
link   
I usually get lost for hours in these types of things and then, months later, will DVR and watch the inevitable NOVA specials that follow!

I think, as usual, this will answer a couple of questions that anthropologists / paleontologists have but those answers will generate a ton of new questions.

Still the journey is exciting, isn't it?



[edit on 6/23/10 by Hefficide]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:37 PM
link   
Star and Flag

This 'missing link' ancestor of man sounds like the Annunaki

They were the Nephilim, the 'giants' who descended down from Heavena that the Sumerian tribe describes in the bible.

Humans ( Annunaki + primate)

The Annunaki were an advanced extraterrestrial race that visited Earth and genetically engineered mankind through their advanced knowledge of science.

More proof for the Ancient Alien theory!!!!!!!!!!!!!



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:14 PM
link   
Quit fascinating.. Starting to wonder if they will find more there as it seems like the area may have been a burial ground.. Have they found any other artifacts with the remains ?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:19 PM
link   
reply to post by airspoon
 


Her species was not a direct ancestor of ours, but rather, a break off from the one that led to us, if I recall.


Just a reminder to you all. There's infinite possibilities for intelligent life to evolve into. Some not even that smart. Lucy's species did not understand how to build simple shelters.

Makes you think what's out there.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:29 PM
link   
Great find!!!! But...where's his head??
I hope they find the rest of him soon. I mean you can't go around without all your body parts now can you?


Should be interesting to see how much more we can find and learn about.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:29 PM
link   
reply to post by Gorman91
 


Australopithecus afarensis (A. afarensis) is believed to be a common ancestor of ours and other hominins such as the chimpanzee. However, that doesn't mean that there isn't plenty to learn from this species, including how we evolved. Lucy's species not being a direct ancestor to humans, does not diminish the promising breakthroughs in anthropology that these finds could provide.

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:53 PM
link   
reply to post by airspoon
 


Indeed. Too true. Sorry if I sounded that way.

It's important because we can study what lead to our own species' ancestors taking predominance over them. And, if we see another world one day, we can use that knowledge to interact with the locals.




top topics



 
6

log in

join