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'Superstorm' rages on exoplanet

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posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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'Superstorm' rages on exoplanet


news.bbc.co.uk

Astronomers have measured high-speed winds in the atmosphere of a planet orbiting a distant star.

...Writing in Nature, a team detected longitudinal winds of roughly 2km/s (7,000km/h) in the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" planet...

...The planet HD209458b orbits a star in the constellation Pegasus, some 150 light-years away...

...a surface temperature of about 1,000C on its hot side.

...as the planet always has the same side to its star, one side is broiling, whereas the other is much cooler.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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Are you ready for your first exoplanetary weather forecast? (You heard it first on ATS.)

Pretty mind-boggling stuff if you ask me, both in terms of the technological wizardry used to make this discovery and also in terms of the results.

Would anyone like to second my prediction that this won't be the first exoplanet on future astronauts' itineraries? Can you imagine a wind traveling at 2 kilometres a second? Second prediction: not too many alien life forms hail from HD209458b.

(Anyone else grateful to have been born on good ol' planet earth?)


news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 23/6/10 by pause4thought]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:12 PM
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Did they drill an oil well in their ocean and trigger a disaster?

Sorry! Couldn't resist
Gotta love intergalactic weather reports. This is very cool that we can see this far away. I don't know what this really buys us, but who knows...someday maybe we'll have even better technology that will allow us to travel to and study these other planets and solar systems to the point where we can learn some lessons from them. And someday maybe one them will even be our new home when we're done with this one.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 



Did they drill an oil well in their ocean and trigger a disaster?

Maybe that's what our forebears did to Jupiter.


Maybe, just maybe there aren't too many oxygen-laden, water-covered, temperate planets out there. Maybe HD209458b is trying to tell us something.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Good post, I love this stuff
. I've often wondered about the "cold side" theroy though. If the wind is blowing that fast and hot would there be a "cold side"? I guess the sun facing side would be roasting at that distance but woud'nt the dark side also be hot due to the very rapid winds? I don't know, just thinking.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by JMech
 


Great thinking. That's quite a conundrum.


Maybe it has something to do with the following:


The planet HD209458b orbits a star in the constellation Pegasus... It circles this star at around one-eighth the distance Mercury orbits the Sun.

Not so much an explanation as a starting point. Someone's bound to come in with a hypothesis, though.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Eh. Not so mind boggling.

When dealing with space, there is one simple rule. if it can be done here, it can be done at least 10X better somewhere else.


I know we have a lot of nature lovers here on ATS, but the facts are simple. there is plenty of Earth-like worlds out there. Plenty. Earth is just one pearl in a shallow sea of millions of oysters. Welcome to the club Earth.


I made something similar some time ago.

A world where land species evolved after air flying species. And where the atmosphere and gravity were just right so you could swim through the air.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by Gorman91]

lol, forgot it.




[edit on 23-6-2010 by Gorman91]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


I'm ashamed to admit this but when I read about hot Jupiters the movie "The Chronicles Of Riddick" comes to mind
. In the movie they state the prison planet "Creamatoria is something like 700 degrees on the day side and -100 on the night side, then they are walking around in tee shirts at night later in the movie. Just want to throw a brick through my t.v! Guess I expect too much from Hollywood.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 



if it can be done here, it can be done at least 10X better somewhere else.

You mean like trashing an exquisite planet?

Seriously, though, can you see mankind doing anything differently elsewhere? Maybe we're the ones the aliens have nightmares about...



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:43 PM
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Modern sciences ability to literally reach out and analyze distant worlds like this is getting a bit spooky if you ask me. We can't get humans to Mars but we can deduce what other worlds are like 150 light-years away!


I've tried keeping track on distant world discoveries but have been busy lately. Any word on if they have found an "Earth" type in the supposed [Sweet Spot] yet?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


no not yet, you need to wait about 3 years for the results of the kepler mission.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


I got to hope and pray no.

The solution, however, is not different energy. Forget not. Hydrogen cars put out water vapor, a worse green house gas than CO2. Electric fills landfills with toxic batteries. Solar had mercury contents.

It sucks.

besides making less people eon this planet by dispersing them on other ones, there is one energy solution I can think of. And that is an energy vacuum sucking electrons out of the air. I saw a design of it, but I'm not allowed to speak about it. Suffice to say, it uses magnets and angles light to knock electrons off materials. This does not use mercury, and has plenty of energy.

Besides that, I think we would screw up a few planets before we get it right. At least there's 5x10^95th power of mass in the universe to screw up on. Plenty of wiggle room to improve on.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by yeti101
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


no not yet, you need to wait about 3 years for the results of the kepler mission.



Hmm 3 years? I'm pretty sure I read on either daily mail or the guardian's article on this that the scientists would review the new findings of those 750 exoplanets and have it released by Q1 2011. I'll have a look and see where that was.

At any rate, there probably aren't any Earth-like exoplanets found in the first bunch, so you're right, it could take 3 years or more to find that important second marble. I'm very exited about Kepler, glad we have it up there
.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
Modern sciences ability to literally reach out and analyze distant worlds like this is getting a bit spooky if you ask me. We can't get humans to Mars but we can deduce what other worlds are like 150 light-years away!


I've tried keeping track on distant world discoveries but have been busy lately. Any word on if they have found an "Earth" type in the supposed [Sweet Spot] yet?


Well....they will tell you that they can deduce what other worlds are like 150 light years away. Whether that is true or not depends on if you believe that humankind hasn't been running down yet another dead end relating to our scientific theories.
Given our track record, i am not holding out much hope.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 



The solution, however, is not different energy. Forget not. Hydrogen cars put out water vapor, a worse green house gas than CO2. Electric fills landfills with toxic batteries. Solar had mercury contents.

Well there's always wind power, not to mention wave power and hydrothermic. (Can you imagine the potential of a 2kms/sec mega storm, BTW?
)

The solutions are surely out there. The barriers are probably more to do with commercial and political interest groups than potential. (You yourself mentioned something about electrons from the air around us; problem is, if it could be harvested without charge it'll never see the light of day.)



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
Modern sciences ability to literally reach out and analyze distant worlds like this is getting a bit spooky if you ask me. We can't get humans to Mars but we can deduce what other worlds are like 150 light-years away!


I've tried keeping track on distant world discoveries but have been busy lately. Any word on if they have found an "Earth" type in the supposed [Sweet Spot] yet?


Worse yet, we can't get a decent weather forecast on Earth, or tell with any certainty if something was damaged by a tornado or straight line winds, but we can measure the winds on a planet 150 million light years away?

I don't buy it! For that matter, I don't buy all the math that leads us to believe that there is even a planet there. We have to make a huge amount of assumptions on previous theory and previous math to jump to the conclusion that a slightly shifted spectrum of some specific wavelength of light that has travelled toward the earth for 150 million years means anything at all.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thought
reply to post by Gorman91
 



The solution, however, is not different energy. Forget not. Hydrogen cars put out water vapor, a worse green house gas than CO2. Electric fills landfills with toxic batteries. Solar had mercury contents.

Well there's always wind power, not to mention wave power and hydrothermic. (Can you imagine the potential of a 2kms/sec mega storm, BTW?
)

The solutions are surely out there. The barriers are probably more to do with commercial and political interest groups than potential. (You yourself mentioned something about electrons from the air around us; problem is, if it could be harvested without charge it'll never see the light of day.)


Wind power takes "wind energy" out of the atmosphere and changes it to electricity for our personal consumption. Is our TV more important than our atmosphere? What about the consequences when all the wind is harnessed?

Wave Action or Tidal Power takes energy out of our oceans. What about the consequences when all the natural rhythms of the sea are harnessed for our personal consumption?

Solar Power takes energy that once radiated to the Earth. Consequences?

Geothermal takes power that once emanated from within the Earth. Consequences?

THE ONLY SOLUTION IS: USE LESS ENERGY!



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I see where you're coming from.

Nevertheless I'm not convinced:


Wind power takes "wind energy" out of the atmosphere... What about the consequences when all the wind is harnessed?

I'd say there's far too much wind available for this to have a major impact, (though, I suggest, we probably require improvements in energy transmission before power generated this way could be made available on a vast scale).


Wave Action or Tidal Power takes energy out of our oceans. What about the consequences when all the natural rhythms of the sea are harnessed for our personal consumption?

Oceans like the Atlantic have virtually limitless potential. Again issues of transmission of generated energy come to the fore.


Solar Power takes energy that once radiated to the Earth. Consequences?

I'd have to say negligible. (Though if there were a small effect, a little cooling wouldn't go amiss, would it?
)


Geothermal takes power that once emanated from within the Earth. Consequences?

Again totally inconsequential. The heat basically just dissipates (or remains underground) in the natural course of events.


THE ONLY SOLUTION IS: USE LESS ENERGY!

It ain't gunna happen. Economic growth + developing nations + population growth = ever increasing need for energy. In the real world.

I'm open to persuasion, though.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


LOL!

The potential use of fossil fuels less than 100 years ago with seemingly endless supplies of coal and oil and a young industrial age seemed inconsequential as well!


One thing to note: In my opinion all energy emanated from the sun. Solar, Wind, Tidal, and Geothermal are all products of heat and gravity and interaction between the Sun, Earth, and Moon. Even Fossil Fuels are biofuels that grew by processes aided by the sun, and then decomposed by those same processes and then transformed via heat and pressure again from that heat/gravity process. Therefore, all energy is solar energy.

Now, I used to have a link to a site that showed all the energy that the sun emanates to the surface of the Earth on a daily basis. On that link it estimated that by the year 2100, we would be using all that energy and more! By that site's estimation, by the year 2300 at current growth rates, we would have depleted all of the Earth's reserves of energy and be consuming many times more energy than the sun radiates us with on a daily basis! I lost my link, and the documents that I had saved from it (part of research for a book, lost one dam memory stick!).

So, an inconsequential amount from the wind (butterfly effect) becomes very consequential as our usage grows and the consequences accumulate.

150 years ago there was absolutely no use for oil, and then we discovered some uses, and now it is a limited resource!

I wonder how things will look 150 years from now?



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I like your style. Long-term thinkers are worth listening to.


I accept the butterfly effect argument to a degree, but it is arguably more a statement of the obvious (i.e. all actions have potentially unforeseeable consequences) than a major sticking point. Otherwise how would mankind progress in any way?

You've clearly got some fascinating theories spinning around your head.


Maybe you could come up with a way of harvesting the energy on other planetary bodies? (Please don't tell me the potential 'butterfly effect' would keep you from even considering it.
)



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