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The Special "TOP HAT" Cover on Top of the BOP has Apparently Blown Off!

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posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by djzombie
 


I don't know. I didn't look very big & the top had 2 open slots like a toaster so it didn't look like it was used to collect anything. The other weird thing was that they wires/cords looked like they had been all unplugged for awhile - like maybe it happened during the explosion or before. Who knows?




posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:51 AM
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www.deepdowncorp.com...
I assume it's something of that variety.
A source for the ROVs to replenish, for extended stays down there.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by shadowkhas
 


That is exactly what it is! Thanks!



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 02:49 AM
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Originally posted by djzombie
based on your description i think you're talking about this



seems there is alot of activity going on right now by that robot arm you see on that rover cam.

Description on the bottom of teh cam says "accumulator ops" i would guess that is this devices function - though again just a guess.

[edit on 24-6-2010 by djzombie]


a Accumulator is a pressure storage device for hydraulic pressure.

I believe the box shape unit is a hydraulic pump system for recharging the Shear and Annular ram accumulators on the BOP to try to get them to work right.
www.itcas.no...
impressiveimpreza.ru... ow+out+preventer

The hydraulic pump system will be set up near the BOP and hydraulic line will be run to the BOP over flying leads that they have been placing over the last few days.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 05:23 AM
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reply to post by ANNED
 

Hi Anned,

I was also wondering if this LMRP cap (the "top hat") is the same as the one that was on the BOP before. It seems that this one has more of those rocket-style "fins" but it's hard to say. On the other hand, even when they were moving it into place it looked a bit "used", as if it had served some time already, so perhaps they just made some small modifications to it prior to re-installing it.

On to your other main points, that discussed the possibility they may be setting up equipment to re-try the BOP's hydraulic rams using a more powerful hydraulic pump located in situ.

I suppose they might do this, but I'm nervous about it. As the report for that BOP's subsea test (from Feb 10) states, none of those manifolds or rams were tested beyond 7,200 psi. So while that BOP may have been rated at 15,000 psi, it was not even tested to half that pressure.

This is pretty worrying in light of the figures given in Halliburton's "Production Casing Design Report" for this Macondo Prospect MC 252 #1 well. This report, dated April 18, 2010 states in section 1.2 (Parameters) that the "fracture zone pressure" is 14,255 psi and the "reservoir pore pressure" is 13,197 psi.

(Note: I assume that the above-quoted pdf documents have already been posted and linked to here on ATS in one or more threads. If they haven't could someone let me know?)

Those pressures given in the Halliburton report are way beyond the ones that the BOP was tested to back in February. Even if the pressure data in the April report was accurate then (and not higher), there is still a chance that the well is gushing at higher pressures now. After all, it clearly hasn't slackened off and even the low estimates (that we've all doubtless seen) state that it's running at 20,000 psi.

So, seeing that the BOP has taken a real pounding over the last 60-plus days, and seeing also that while rated to 15,000 psi it's not been tested in situ to even that figure, would it be wise for them to attempt to test its hydraulic rams now?

Mike



[edit on 24/6/10 by JustMike]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 05:30 AM
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Just a summary of overnight feed activity for those interested as of 6:30 EST:

Ocean Intervention III
ROV 1: Strange green screen, no feed at all overnight.
ROV 2: Surveyed flow line route due north then zigzagged east to west.
Examined numerous large fissures as seen below. This big boy
actually seemed to have gotten bigger. ROV watched it awhile



Live feeds from Viking Poseidon
ROV 1: Unavailable
ROV 2: Unavailable

Live feeds from Boa Deep C
ROV 1: Stayed in position all night and watched the "snow" coming down
As of 6:30AM EST its moving & seems to be relocating market buoys
ROV 2: Not recording

Live feeds from Skandi
ROV 1: On Bottom, hasn't moved since top cap replaced. Seems focused on
what may be a small inclinator or level attached to a base on the seabed
which has since nearly fallen to its side.
ROV 2: Stayed focused on BOP & Cap. Plume appears copperish. Volumn
seems to be the same. Appears to be a lot more staining and
possible oxidation on surrounding gear.

Live feeds from Enterprise
ROV 1: Stayed a distance away from the BOP, which was just a light in the
distance
ROV 2: Same position as during the day on the BOP. Plume volume seem to
pick up within the last hour. More staining of equipment

Live feeds from Q4000
ROV 1: Hovered around same location all night. Saw nothing but blue water
ROV 2: Unavailable

Apart from the OCI3 Rov moving about, it was an usually quiet night. Haven't seen this level of relative inactivity in awhile considering they normally do everything at night.

[edit on 24-6-2010 by Moriarty]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 05:52 AM
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reply to post by Moriarty
 

Thank you for that excellent summary!
You saved me doing one; I was only half-way through my writeup but yours is better anyway.


About the green screens we get sometimes on some feeds: either the asset is actually off-line, or else they are using its feed but are simply not alowing us to see it. Easily done, after all. They can watch it via the mms. URL source code without converting that to an http address for "public consumption".

If you have an opinion on the points I raised in the post above yours (re pressures and testing the BOP's rams) then I'd be glad for it. In fact I'd appreciate any opinions on this point, and not just because of this BOP but the relief well.

Obviously, the relief well also must have a BOP fitted to it, assumedly near the sea floor. Considering what's already happened, are they sure that the relief well's BOP will be up to the task of preventing another blowout when they finally tap into the existing, damaged well? What's the rating of the relief wel''s BOP? What pressure tests has it had? I have yet to find any definitive info about this, so if anyone knows some sources that will clarify these points then please let us know.

Regards,

Mike


[edit on 24/6/10 by JustMike]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 08:06 AM
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Hi,

What are we looking at from Enterprise ROV 1 ? I don't recognise it?

Also, Intervention ROV 2 seems to be scanning the seabed - what are all those lines, or trenches?



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 08:36 AM
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reply to post by Moriarty
 


Yes, I find it interesting that Intervention Rov 2 is still scanning for something and Sandki ROV 1 hasn't moved for over 12hrs.
The TopHat's crooked or is that as good of a fit they could get concidering how badly the pipe looked with the first TopHat was removed? Is BP just going through the motions now or is something else going on?
Another thing I'm wondering about, not sure if it's been brought up, but what's going to happen to the leak if a hurrican comes through? It would seem that for safety all ships would have to move out of the area including the one controling the TopHat and the attached tanker wouldn't they?



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 08:58 AM
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Also, what's the score with all the methane that has reportedly been leaking?
Is there methane down there and is it collecting on the sea bed as a bubble as some have suggested? (Reference to gigantic explosions and tsunamis etc)



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 09:05 AM
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Logic says that if they are continually monitoring the sea bed, they must know that something is brewing... If all was ok apart from the leak, then they wouldnt keep trawling the sea bed... I think they are worried about volcanic action, or maybe Abiotic oil leaks, or maybe methane?? they definately know something that's for sure....



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by ckitch
Also, what's the score with all the methane that has reportedly been leaking?
Is there methane down there and is it collecting on the sea bed as a bubble as some have suggested? (Reference to gigantic explosions and tsunamis etc)



It is definitely leaking. There are definitely dead zones of depleted oxygen (due to methane), and nobody is reporting whether it is "actually" pooling in methane lakes and bubbles, but I can guarantee you that it is. At that temperature and depth the Methane is pretty stable in solution with sea water and it will mostly just linger around. If it is violently disturbed, or if the sea water becomes saturated, then you get all those doomsday scenarios (tsunami, explosion, etc.). Those scenarios are very plausible. Also should note that the Gulf had many Methane and Brine lakes prior to this oil leak, so we are aggravating an already volatile situation.

gulfblog.uga.edu...

There is a link to Professor Joye's blog verifying the dead zones and oil plumes. She even mentions air quality and the need for respirators in certain areas.


[edit on 24-6-2010 by getreadyalready]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by Moriarty

Originally posted by tdatreefrog
Just to add and maybe someone can answer my query. I have spent the last three weekends in Clearwater beach. For those unfamiliar it is west of tampa. My family and I noticed at several random times during our trips very strong smell of sulphur. It was so strong at night that it was making us sick to our stomach. keep in mind this is not on the panhandle but central florida gulf coast. Is there something at all normal about this. All of my eight years in florida I have never smelled this on the east coast but this is the first time I have been on the gulf coast in almost 6 years. I am gonna say not normal but maybe some locals or experts can explaine this.


I'v been to Clearwater every year for 20 years, I have never experienced a sulfur smell. Very disheartening to hear.



The only thing I worry about is whether or not it is dangerous. We live in Orlando and plan on traveling to clearwater every weekend while we still can swim and enjoy it. I just wonder at what point it will become dangerous to breath the air or is it already?



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Thanks for posting a link to Professor Joye's blog. That is very informative. She Has some great first hand descriptions and photos on her blog. Outstanding source for information!

I will certainly watch her blog for updates.

Folks, If you want the skinny on the chemical and microbial status of this gusher and the waters of the golf, this is a MUST READ blog!


Posting the link again for the left click challanged.

gulfblog.uga.edu...



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by Moriarty
 


Thanks for the update... Just what I needed. It scares me that the ocean floor seems to be getting worse and opening up cracks. Need to pay close attention to this!~



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by Moriarty
 


I wouldn't worry to much as there are phosphate mines and also sulfur mines around that area,and when the wind blows in a certain direction you will get that smell.I was born and raised in Tampa and trust me you do get to smell sulfur, but it is a rare thing. I guess when you live there for a long time you just get used to it and it doesn't really bother you as much as just smelling it for the first time. I don't think you have to much to worry about it probably won't stay around long.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by ANNED
 

Hi Anned,


This is pretty worrying in light of the figures given in Halliburton's "Production Casing Design Report" for this Macondo Prospect MC 252 #1 well. This report, dated April 18, 2010 states in section 1.2 (Parameters) that the "fracture zone pressure" is 14,255 psi and the "reservoir pore pressure" is 13,197 psi.

(Note: I assume that the above-quoted pdf documents have already been posted and linked to here on ATS in one or more threads. If they haven't could someone let me know?)



Mike



[edit on 24/6/10 by JustMike]


In all of the redundant posts and such I have missed it could you provide a link?

Apologies fr editing your questions about the relief well BOP and the existing one. the reason is I believe you have found a very important clue in this
"(Parameters) that the "fracture zone pressure" is 14,255 psi and the "reservoir pore pressure" is 13,197 psi."
Someone correct me if I am wrong but this seems to indicate ~1000psi only separating the static pressure on the oil (reservoir pore pressure) and the pressure of the strata which is fractile. With the huge variability of the outflow we have seen along with the increase in volume it becomes more likely even a minor "burp" could fail this well and likely did. As for the "bumping" if this deposit is sitting on a batholith or laccolith the whole business would behave like a pressure cooker when tapped and begin furiously bumping and expanding and spewing with pressure "bumps" as hot compressed liquids became vaporous. I think of it as a geothermal hydrocarbon vent and earths way of spewing back at us the poisons we have been making that have lled to this.
( the last line is because since this post is over a few lines it won't be read.. :lol

N.

[edit on 24-6-2010 by N.of norml]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by tsurfer2000h
reply to post by Moriarty
 


I wouldn't worry to much as there are phosphate mines and also sulfur mines around that area,and when the wind blows in a certain direction you will get that smell.I was born and raised in Tampa and trust me you do get to smell sulfur, but it is a rare thing. I guess when you live there for a long time you just get used to it and it doesn't really bother you as much as just smelling it for the first time. I don't think you have to much to worry about it probably won't stay around long.


OK. That puts my mind at ease alot. I love the area and I am really depressed to think the oil will come to the area.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by N.of norml
 

Thanks for your response. I was beginning to wonder if anyone had followed what I was getting at in my post. I think what you've said is probably right: there is not a great deal of difference between those two pressures and that's a concern.

I think it's also important to repeat that those who were making decisions in this case had to be aware that the pressures in that well had been reported at above 13,000 psi, but even so, they used a BOP that was rated to "only" 15,000 psi. (I say "only" because that is still a pretty huge number.) This means that they were allowing only a fairly small amount of leeway as a safety margin -- even under ideal conditions and if everything in the BOP functioned perfectly and continued to do so.

Is it normal practice in most industries to employ absolutely vital "fail safe" shutdown equipment that itself has a safe working limit only about 15% above known and rather extreme conditions? That seems like a very slim margin to me, especially considering what the consequences would be in the event that the "fail safe" also fails.

Like it did in this case.

Here's the table which shows these parameters. I've added "dots" in so that it will more-or-less line up:


1.2 Parameters
Fracture Zone Measured Depth..........................18305.0 ft
Fracture Zone Gradient.....................................0.779 psi/ft
Fracture Zone Density......................................15.00 Ib/gal
Fracture Zone Pressure....................................14255 psi
Reservoir Measured Depth................................18200.0 ft
Reservoir Pore Pressure...................................13197 psi
Reservoir Zone Gradient...................................0.726 psi/ft
Reservoir Zone Density....................................13.97 Ib/gal
Back Pressure..................................................0 psi
Height - Mud Line to Mean Sea Level..................4992.0 ft
Height - Mean Sea Level to Rotary Kelly Bushing 75.0 ft
Sea Water Density............................................8.54 Ib/gal
Returns To Surface
Simulator Volume Increment..............................5.00 bbl
Surface Iron Displacement.................................0.41 bbl
Shoe Track Length............................................189.0 ft
Additional Pressure to Seat Plug.........................500 psi
Eccentricity Enhanced Calculations......................No
Erodibility Enhanced Calculations........................Yes
Mud Erodibility Measured Depth..........................17168.0 ft
Mud Erodibility Number......................................20.69
Mud Required Shear Stress................................29.00 Ibf/(100*ft2)
Use Coupling Information...................................No
Created: April 18, 2010 at 11:25 AM
OptiCem v6.4.8 (OC v6.4.8)
Business Confidential


Here is a link to obtain a pdf copy of the complete Halliburton Production Casing Design Report 4.18.2010 for the Macondo Prospect MC 252 #1 well, from which the above data is taken.

Here is a link to obtain a pdf copy of the Transocean-Deepwater Horizon BOP Subsea Test of Feb 10, 2010, which shows (among other things) that no component of this BOP was tested beyond 7,200 psi.

For anyone who wants more documents that might be otherwise hard to find, you can obtain them at this link to the Energy & Commerce Committee's page where many documents are available for download. Well, they are at the moment, anyway...

Mike



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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.

Here's the table which shows these parameters. I've added "dots" in so that it will more-or-less line up:


1.2 Parameters
Fracture Zone Measured Depth..........................18305.0 ft
Fracture Zone Gradient.....................................0.779 psi/ft
Fracture Zone Density......................................15.00 Ib/gal
Fracture Zone Pressure....................................14255 psi
Reservoir Measured Depth................................18200.0 ft
Reservoir Pore Pressure...................................13197 psi
Reservoir Zone Gradient...................................0.726 psi/ft
Reservoir Zone Density....................................13.97 Ib/gal
Back Pressure..................................................0 psi
Height - Mud Line to Mean Sea Level..................4992.0 ft
Height - Mean Sea Level to Rotary Kelly Bushing 75.0 ft
Sea Water Density............................................8.54 Ib/gal
Returns To Surface
Simulator Volume Increment..............................5.00 bbl
Surface Iron Displacement.................................0.41 bbl
Shoe Track Length............................................189.0 ft
Additional Pressure to Seat Plug.........................500 psi
Eccentricity Enhanced Calculations......................No
Erodibility Enhanced Calculations........................Yes
Mud Erodibility Measured Depth..........................17168.0 ft
Mud Erodibility Number......................................20.69
Mud Required Shear Stress................................29.00 Ibf/(100*ft2)
Use Coupling Information...................................No
Created: April 18, 2010 at 11:25 AM
OptiCem v6.4.8 (OC v6.4.8)
Business Confidential


Here is a link to obtain a pdf copy of the complete Halliburton Production Casing Design Report 4.18.2010 for the Macondo Prospect MC 252 #1 well, from which the above data is taken.

Here is a link to obtain a pdf copy of the Transocean-Deepwater Horizon BOP Subsea Test of Feb 10, 2010, which shows (among other things) that no component of this BOP was tested beyond 7,200 psi.

For anyone who wants more documents that might be otherwise hard to find, you can obtain them at this link to the Energy & Commerce Committee's page where many documents are available for download. Well,

WOW!! and WOW again.
You expect for the exploratory company to be looking for the optimaldrilling point and the best they are showing is that the site chosen has over 100ft if overlap with the fractile zone. Assuming the company was proposing the best site in the region one can infer that there are other sites with greater overlap which were rejected.
That this was ever approved is jaw dropping and is the nail in the coffin of any "nuke it" idiocy as the fracture zone IS the lid of the deposit and is already severely compromised by infiltration of hydrocarbons.
So OK I knew the well failure had compromised the integrity of the cap dome due to early reports of new plumes miles from the well site but this knowledge is taking the "I knew it was real bad" and turning it into they all knew it was real bad before they ever began drilling, and did not give a rusty rodents arse. Or worse they do care but what they care about include the destruction of thousands to millions of lives. Indeed we are seeing it unfold just so.
N.



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