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Oil Rain In Lousiana?

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posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 

good luck with your thread
as most folks scolded me
for posting my toxic rain
in NC thread here

www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by Under Water
I'm in south Louisiana and it pretty much rains nearly every day now, which is typical in the summer. we live in a steamy environment, the air gets so thick sometimes it feels like it's hard to breath.

I looked at the videos. It reminds me of what it looks like when it first rains in an area where a leaky car was parked. If oil was in fact coming in the rain, i think we would hear about it from all over. I do have an open mind about it though, and it very well may still happen. afterall, it rains frogs on occasion. And if the rain can pick up frogs and insects, it can pick up oil. It doesn't have to evaporate to get picked up.

It's been raining here, so i just walked outside and inspected. No funny smells. No oil on the ground or even in the streets and sidewalks. And my garden is looking better than ever right now.


Underwater, (et al)

I agree 100%. I lived in Mandeville, Metairie and Slidell for around 30 years.
It nothing but road oil after a rain as mentioned a few times above.
River Ridge especially a trailer park in River Ridge??? Come on. These guys justed wanted a BS video to post on youtube.

I can't believe there is actually a thread about this.
Check a map. R.R. is on the Miss. River north of Nawlins.
If it was raining oil I am sure the Garden District blue bloods would be screaming their collective butts off. "Oh NO, oily rain on St. Charles??"
"the street cars will slide all over the place!!!!" or "My Beemer is just RUINT, Shugar"

I give up with all of these stupid threads about the oil "spill".

One of the ROV's makes a fast move and you get: "Oh I didn't know ROV's could move that fast!" or one post "those people (topside) are running around like chickens with their heads cut off!". Those ROV ops are the best in the world and most live in the immediate area. Do you think they want this to happen to their families?

Anyway, sorry for the rant but the "deny ignorance" motto on these oil "spill" threads have gone the way of total foolishness. BTW it is NOT a SPILL!!!!

No more on these threads...going back to the Firehose.

Bye and 73's
Tom



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Oil can in fact evaporate.

Ile wait for more videos before I run around shouting ITS RAINING OIL!!!!

so many people ' # britain this ', ' # britain that ', When a volcano erupts, people blame icelandic people, that's how #ing dumb people are.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by Mr Zeropoint]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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Gonna need a bigger sample than that to make any kind of argument, junior.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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Gonna need a bigger sample than that to make any kind of argument, junior.

Double post. wth?

[edit on 23-6-2010 by AwakeinNM]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:22 PM
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I worry I will see this in FL. God have mercy on our souls. With no fish from the see and no crops... whats left to eat???



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by robbinsj
I worry I will see this in FL. God have mercy on our souls. With no fish from the see and no crops... whats left to eat???


Not to downplay the tragedy of this oil leak situation, but who exactly has convinced you people that there is more oil in the earth than there is water in the ocean and that it's all going to leak out of one friggin oil well?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:38 PM
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Get it right OP, MMS is BOE now



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 06:19 PM
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Uh, I live in SE Louisiana and it's definitely not raining oil.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM

Originally posted by robbinsj
I worry I will see this in FL. God have mercy on our souls. With no fish from the see and no crops... whats left to eat???


Not to downplay the tragedy of this oil leak situation, but who exactly has convinced you people that there is more oil in the earth than there is water in the ocean and that it's all going to leak out of one friggin oil well?


The point is the region and PEOPLE depend on their environment to be there and produce food, jobs and $$$. First will be food production and eventually satellite industries, from tourism to fine dinning, Hotels, Tourist traps. Then sure enough the supply will go down and demand will go up, prices WILL go up. Sure there is a massive ocean, but your comment is like me brushing off an atomic event peppering the whole southwest.
BP cannot and will not pay for every instance of economic harm this has created.
The hidden "violence" as Ayn Rands grandson puts it, is the health cost, this will make
Nuked Japan look like a bar brawl in the long run.The Humidity,,, gonna soak up that crap and "inject" it directly into every bodies lungs, which is where gaseous exchange meets the blood.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by Caji316
If it is true that rain is pure, then there is no such thing as acid rain then....I believe it can rain things other than pure distilled water from the sky though....


Rain is pure. Acid rain is caused by falling rain intersecting with particles suspended in the air.

That said:

jalopnik.com...




Our first thoughts were oil we're accustomed to dealing with generally doesn't evaporate, and that's true for engine oil sitting on a shelf, however crude oil at sea is an entirely different story.

According to a 2003 study titled "Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates, and Effects" put out by Ocean Studies Board, Marine Board, and Transportation Research Board, oil behaves very differently when on the open water. The study states: It's Raining Oil In Louisiana?

Within a few days following a spill, light crude oils can lose up to 75 percent of their initial volume and medium crudes up to 40 percent. In contrast, heavy or residual oils will lose no more than 10 percent of their volume in the first few days following a spill. Most oil spill behavior models include evaporation as a process and as a factor in the output of the model.

The oil included in the Deepwater Horizon disaster is most certainly crude, and was at one point a heavy crude, which reduces the overall loss to evaporation, however it's been mixed up by the effects of the ocean and become an emulsification, which according to the study, enhances the likelihood of evaporation:

Emulsification, if it occurs, has a great effect on the behavior of oil spills at sea. As a result of emulsification, evaporation slows spreading by orders of magnitude, and the oil rides lower in the water column, showing different drag with respect to the wind.

So considering the effect of light and crude oil evaporation and seawater emulsification oil from the Deepwater Horizon may be having an effect on the water cycle. An unknown variable on the overall cycle is the introduction of BP's dispersant of choice, Corexit 9500, which may be either helping or hurting the degree of evaporation.

Dispersants break up the natural surface tension in oil, sending small droplets into the water column and reducing the surface area which may evaporate, however it also changes the chemistry of the oil which remains on the surface. We have yet to find any science on the subject of the evaporation rates of these compounds or their likelihood to come back down as contaminated rain. In the worst case scenario this sheen is actually oil mixed Corexit, which according to Bellona.org: is associated with headaches, vomiting and reproductive problems as sides effects at high doses to clean-up workers. 2-BE has also been documented to cause the breakdown of red blood cells, leading to blood in urine and feces, and can damage the kidneys, liver, spleen and bone marrow of humans – effects not included on the information sheet for workers.


edit: sorry, quote is choppy, see the link to see proper context.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by justadood]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:20 PM
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Originally posted by boondock-saint
reply to post by Vitchilo
 

good luck with your thread
as most folks scolded me
for posting my toxic rain
in NC thread here

www.abovetopsecret.com...




No one scolded you. you asked for people's opinions on photos and then got upset when people gave opinions you didnt want. As i recall, those of us who gave the unwanted opinions were called 'shills', or some such thing.

did you ever do any kind of formal testing?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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Is the sheen due to the dispersants? I'm just trying to wrap my head around how this could happen.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:45 PM
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I put this thread up a couple of weeks ago about oil evaporation, if anyone wants to take a look.

It does have some interesting comments and links, and one of them is to a chart which lists the different types of oil, and under what circumstances they evaporate.

Although there is no question that it does evaporate, (as is evidenced by the fact that you can smell it.....in the vapors), I'm not sure it's to the degree that is shown in these videos.


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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Crude can partially evaporate crude oil is a cocktail of many c-h molecules the difference is the cx hx with some sulfur thrown in . Some evaporate with little or no heat like natural gas or propane and gasoline .

From a barrel of crude you can get natural gases propane butane benzene gasoline kerosene diesel and good old motor oil and some assorted ch groups as well .

To separate these products they heat them and run it threw a fractional distiller . The gases of course leave at the top and the oil at the bottom . The good old gasoline we burn every day is first heated to a vapor then condensated back to a liquid . Many oil products will evaporate in the sun . Heating oil under pressure they can break down the long carbon chains to smaller carbon chains which can be more volatile than regular that the longer chain. I don't know enough about the dispersants if it would aid in the breaking of long carbon chains making more oil to be evaporated off

Depending on the type of crude the proportions of the gases and heavy oils is different . Also the amount of sulfur content varies as well H2S also is released.

The term VOC is volatile organic chemical (or compound depending on which articles you read ) which are the above gases these combine with other pollutants carbon monoxide , dioxide sulfur oxides to create ground level ozone and acid rain . Nice mix to blow to shore isnt it .

I have never seen or heard a verifiable oil rain but if enough of the light oils did evaporate I don't see why it couldn't condensate like water and rain oil droplets with a regular rain or rain being tainted with oil residue .



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


It doesn't take a large amount of oil to create the oily slick that we see.

Plus there is no context to this video, they show one drain at the side of the road, for all we know this could be the first rain there for sometime and has washed all of the oil and grease that has built up since the last downpour off the roads and into the drain.


[edit on 23/6/10 by Chadwickus]


Sorry to tell you Chad, although I would be suspicious of this video, do not think for one second this is the first rainfall in the area in any length of time. This is Louisiana, it rains here very often. Even if for just an hour or two. Just the other night, early morning hours it was pouring something fierce, but by morning you wouldnt know it. It gets so hot and humid that it dries up rather fast.

In any event, rain is very very common here, and I know for a fact this is not the first rainfall here. On that note... I am going along with most who claim it is oil in the road that slicked up as the rain came down. If you watch the video you can see it is a trailer park of sorts. Which is given away by the big black mobile home frame seen early on in the video, but if you watch there no oil on the pavement area under the mobile home frame. Plus I live here and I have not seen any oil rain of any kind as of yet, however I have an eye on Alex.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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I am surprised that the resident weather man on this site has not chimed in (Oz). I would like to hear his thoughts on the subject.



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