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Oil Rain In Lousiana?

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posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by allprowolfy
 


I think you'll find that any black rain you saw was caused from oil being burnt and entering the atmosphere that way.

It's unlikely that oil in it's natural form will be caught in the normal precipitation process.

There is a chance it can be picked up by a strong enough storm though.




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:45 AM
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I call bunk on this video.

map of LA (sorry, zoom out once to see other cities/towns I refd.)


I live in Denham Springs/ Watson area (northwest of River Ridge - the red star on map) and work in Gonzales. Port Allen, Baton Rouge, and Plaquemine on any given day of the week. I have relatives in Houma, LaRose, and Golden Meadow - all further south (much closer to GOM) than River Ridge and checking with them, none have seen any indication of oil rain. Ziltch.

Rainfall in the summer time (dry season) in Louisiana is almost clockwork - a short burst of heavy rain in the late afternoon, sunny and humid the rest of the day. So far this year, this pattern holds more or less.

I have not seen nor spoken with anyone who has seen oil rain in Louisiana.

Is it possible? sure, I'll concede that.

Is it happening now? I'll have to give a resounding NO.

It was a trailer park in River Ridge. C'mon people. People have wrecked/ abandoned cars all over in places like this, and change their own oil and dump it on the ground/ ditches/ sewers without a care in the world.

South Louisiana is very fond of deep frying, especially outside, in huge 3-5 gallon pots that get dumped as well. The brown goo on the sewer grill looked alot like congealed fry oil residue.

This guy probably believes it is coming from the rain.

I don't.

CDS



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:45 AM
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I have to let you guys know there is no Oil In Bay St Louis MS. I live here on the Coast and I get updates every day from the Local EOC. If there was oil here I would have Video of it posted and would be documenting the efforts to clean it it up.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5
I am pretty sure, and feel free to correct me if I am wrong here, but when water evaporates it leaves all its contaminates behind so it cannot be oil coming from the rain. Distilling water is basically the same process as natural evaporation, and its used to purify water to nearly perfect levels.

[edit on 6/23/2010 by defcon5]


Distilling water is a very exact process. You heat the water to a temperature where only the water specifically vaporizes. They you have a cooling apparatus or tower that condenses all the other stuff and drops it back down, while the water vapor rises and escapes to a seperate chamber. In the presence of Organic material or alkanes, it is usually necessary to first use an organic solvent and separate the mixture into layers. Distillation alone is not enough. It also usually takes several distillation attempts to get the water very pure.

For the situation in the Gulf. The Oil will certainly vaporize, and evaporate (two different things, btw.) Therefore there will be components of the oil, and the gas, and the dispersants in gas phase, and in liquid vapor phase. Those components will certainly mix with the water vapor and be taken up by storm clouds.

Chemical rain is a certainty. The only question is how bad will it be, how far will it go, and how long will it last.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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Not sure about all the ins and outs of it...but my thoughts are that fish don't evaporate correct? so, IMO if it can rain fish..then I would think it could easily rain oil? Now I could be totally wrong, maybe oil doesn't work the same way with raining fish? but I would think if a weather system could pick up fish and rain them down..in one area, but not in another where the rain also fell, than it would seem plausible to me that a part of the weather system could hold oil, while another part might not?


www.news.com.au...



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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Interesting:


A third of the waters turned bitter, and many people died from the waters that had become bitter
-Revelations 8:11


The second trumpet dealt with a mountain ablaze in fire falling into the sea and turning it red...now our water tables will be contaminated.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by Nkinga
 


Can anyone read this and verify what it states on oil and evaporation? Thanks!

www.sott.net...

and then there is this all the way from New Jersey????? might not be related..but is strange.

http://(nolink)/2010/05/22/gulf-oil-spill-hit-nj-oil-washing-barnegat-bay/

This guy on his blog also has this..I don't know the validity of this guy..but if what he says is true, then its very plausiable the oil has spread further than what we are being told, or even maybe more than BP and the government knows since they won't let anyone test it.

http://(nolink)/2010/06/15/bp-gulf-oil-spill-gulf-stream-hit-north-carolina-beaches-day/
[edit on 23-6-2010 by Nkinga]

[edit on 23-6-2010 by Nkinga]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:05 AM
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When i was a kid growing up in East Texas and Louisiana, we had oil top roads (asphalt) and it looked like that every time it rained, absent any massive oils spills. I am not discounting that oily rain fell as I was not there myself, just saying what I saw on that video was what I saw through out the 70's and 80's back home.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by Monsieur Neary
I suppose it's not much different that the fact we don't have salt water raining down all the time, so I would venture, no, probably no oil rain.



Ask anyone that lives near the ocean and they will tell you the biggest destroyer of their homes is salt water. The salt water is picked up into the air and the water evaporates but the salt in blown into the cracks and crevices of their homes.

I had a friend that had to replace his entire balcony due to corrosion from the salt and was shocked that the cost was increased because the salt had even gotten underneath his carpet and caused damage there.

You could see the salt caked in layers under the carpet when it was pulled back.

I don't see why oil could not do the same thing.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by NightSkyeB4Dawn
 


Yes yes yes yes yes.....we own a carlot here in Ga..and I lived in Florida as a young girl in Port St. Lucie..we were about 15 minutes from the beach..and I can tell you, one....when you wake up in the morning you smell two things..salt water and citrus. 2...cars from ocean areas are prone to one major problem...rust...this is due to the salt in the air that sits on the cars and causes paint damage, as well as surface scratch which then causes the rust to begin much faster. Every car we get from someone who is by the ocean has rust, and every care we owned when living in Florida had rust. So, unless you were actually going around and tasting rain water when it fell in salt water areas, I don't think you could actually say the water wasn't salty.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:26 PM
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I'm in south Louisiana and it pretty much rains nearly every day now, which is typical in the summer. we live in a steamy environment, the air gets so thick sometimes it feels like it's hard to breath.

I looked at the videos. It reminds me of what it looks like when it first rains in an area where a leaky car was parked. If oil was in fact coming in the rain, i think we would hear about it from all over. I do have an open mind about it though, and it very well may still happen. afterall, it rains frogs on occasion. And if the rain can pick up frogs and insects, it can pick up oil. It doesn't have to evaporate to get picked up.

It's been raining here, so i just walked outside and inspected. No funny smells. No oil on the ground or even in the streets and sidewalks. And my garden is looking better than ever right now.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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I call BS on this propaganda.

I think what you are seeing in the videos is not out of the norm. Oil accumulates on streets and roads. That's why its so dangerous to drive when it first starts to sprinkle and it makes the roads very slick until a harder rain falls to wash the vehicle drips off the roadways and into the gutters.

Are wild animals drinking the rainwater? Do you have wiggletails in your rain barrels? (Throw in some BT after observation, please.) If the rain water still supports life, it must be fine.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by Alethea]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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Looks like universal healthcare came to America at the right time


Since this is unavoidable for people living down there, they better get free healthcare..



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by Chaos Lord
 


very true, and the corexit contamination is WIDE spread because they are injecting it directly into the main leak. looking at the bot cams you can see when they are injecting the dispersant into the leak, it says something like operation dispersment or similar to that. corexit has been documented to have phase transition capability, it can be evaporated and precipitated.

not too sure about the oil rain video....

[edit on 23-6-2010 by mjsmor]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:10 PM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo


Say bye bye to crops. Say bye bye to water ponds... This is literally turning the south into a toxic wasteland slowly but surely.

But of course it's not as bad as the thousands of tons of DU we dropped in Iraq and Afghanistan.



"My heart trembles for my country when I reflect that God is just."

- Thomas Jefferson

[edit on 23-6-2010 by aravoth]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by Chaos Lord
 


That particular incident had nothing to do with the oil spill or the dispersants. It was caused by a chemical leak at a nearby factory a few days earlier.

Millington Chemical Leak: Updated



[edit on 23-6-2010 by vor78]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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If it is true that rain is pure, then there is no such thing as acid rain then....I believe it can rain things other than pure distilled water from the sky though....



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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As for the particular video referenced in the first post, that looks like roadside runoff to me. I'm not going to discount that a strong storm could deposit some oil onto land along the coast, but the whole widespread oil scenario just seems improbable to me. It would take 175,000 gallons to cover one square mile to a depth of just 1/100th of an inch. There's enough to do that easily, but try multiplying that out past a few counties. You run out of oil in a hurry.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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Okay, so what are people supposed to do if it turns out the rain contains oil? Obviously, people would want to avoid the rainfall by staying indoors, but realistically, how long does it take for people to start feeling the effects of such a rain in the form of illness? I haven't really seen any guidelines on how to respond to such a thing. It seems to me it would be something that would literally shut down a whole city. It seems that the government should address this issue once and for all for the population if it is a likelihood.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:49 PM
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To me I think we have a worst case scenario slowly (or rapidly?) unfolding. I hope I am wrong. I don't think anyone knows exactly how this spill will turn out but everyone agrees it is bad. Very bad. The entire gulf is covered.
Earth Observatory Picture GOM Spill
Unless the oils stops coming out of the well I believe doom and gloom will be at hand. That's hard for me to say as I am usually an optimist.

I think the best anyone can do is be prepared as the entire world will eventually be impacted. Again, I want to be wrong about this worst case scenario but I feel it is best to be prepared now. I live in New England and I have begun a comprehensive effort to stockpile food and water among other things. I have always had a good supply of emergency items but now I have taken my efforts to a new level. In the Gulf it may be too late and if you are evacuated you may not be able to take anything with you.

Hopefully I won't have to leave my home. If someone wanted me to, I would probably have to defend it to the end.

I can't imagine the suffering to all of those people on the Gulf coast.
"Change" has certainly come. "Hope", has not.




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