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Does BP own the oil once it escapes the well

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posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 11:49 PM
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OR can anyone legally collect that crude on their own, either off the beach or off the surface of the water...




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:46 AM
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Think about your question very seriously,since it is apparent you did not before posting.

If they have the rights to drill and if the platform had not exploded and capsized,would they own the oil?

Why do you think the government is so adamant that they pay for cleaning the mess up and stopping the leak.

It is legally their oil.

They drilled the hole they caused the leak.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by Oneolddude
Think about your question very seriously,since it is apparent you did not before posting.

If they have the rights to drill and if the platform had not exploded and capsized,would they own the oil?

Why do you think the government is so adamant that they pay for cleaning the mess up and stopping the leak.

It is legally their oil.

They drilled the hole they caused the leak.


He is correct. Not only do they still own it but they want it back. Matter of fact I have first hand knowledge that one on the main reasons for the delay of clean up is that they are looking for a system that will allow them to clean the oil but still be able to retain it for future use. This has been one of the main reasons for the clean up delay.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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Oil is crap from the planet.

Earth is soaked in oil. The oil tycoons just market their product under the clever advertising moniker of a "dwindling non-renewable energy source" which allows them to sell it at a huge profit because of its increased perceived value.

There is no shortage of oil. It was all a scam.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:47 AM
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I would say any oil in the sea, is not bps. If they have a drilled hole and pipeline, then its theres, but once it spills into the sea, it is not theres.

The oil spilling out is not theres, i would say.

Maybe a court may decide if it is.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by CaptSplatter
 


Recovering the oil for use is a matter of collecting the oil as cleanly as possible. The problem is emulsification when the oil and water is violently mixed (which is what the "tar balls" are). If you collect the non-emulsified oil, division is a simple matter of allowing the oil-water mix to stand in a tank long enough to re-separate then pumping the water out from the bottom of the tank through an ODME (Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment) system in order to monitor when the oil-water interface is reached.

It's something that we do at sea on oil tankers after certain tank cleaning operations.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by Oneolddude
 


Well arent you a grump. I did think about the question. I guess i dont have access to such awesome reserves of wisdom as you.

I notice that while you were condescending to me, you didnt take the time offer any concrete proof to support your opinion, so i'm still going to wait for a more helpful and informative poster if thats just the same to you .:-)

I have looked over some of the maritime laws, but none of them deal with oil spills of this specific nature. I'm not as convinced as you that it is legally theirs and i think its a pretty worth-while question.

if it isnt 'their' oil, technically, it opens up some interesting possibilities. Just because they have to pay for the cleanup doesnt necessarily imply it is their oil.

my humble apologies.

im just saying. if bp is paying people to collect their oil on the beach and surface of the water, why not just go collect it freelance and sell it back to them (or some other company). I mean, there's millions of gallons out there. And that might speed the cleanup up a bit?

Just a thought. If i have insulted anyone's enormous intellect, i am deeply sorry.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by justadood]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


Thats what i suspect, but there doesnt appear to be any clear legal precedent anywhere.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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Lets say you visit a beach in Louisiana and "clean" up several hundred gallons of crude oil which you keep. You cannot use crude oil for anything usefull until its "cracked" or refined. So apart from burning it for heat and light, like a campfire, you wont be putting it in your vehicle.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 01:40 AM
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BP only owns the oil that they drill and contain the leasing right are very specific, so yes you can collect the oil legally unless BP thugs stop you.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by TC Mike
 


Yes. Obviously.

But, like i said, it could still be sold, theoretically, back to someone lik eBP.



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by jeffrybinladen
 


That's what i suspected. You seem informed. On what do you base this assessment? Maritime law?

What does raw crude sell for per barrel? How realistic is it to think a private citizen could sell back crude they collected?

Thanks for the answers, jeff bin lad.




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