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Latest NASA Satellite Image Shows Oil Monster

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posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 03:52 PM
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According to a Discovery documentary I just watched the oil covers an area 10,000 square km .............? That's just 60 odd days of maybe 100,000 barrels a day if we take the top end estimate rather than the msm figure of 80,000 barrels a day....so in total 6 million barrels so far

If the entire reservour of 3-6 billions barrels leaks over time if the relief wells fail...




posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 04:03 PM
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Amazing how every NASA pic has a huge cloud right over the rig.

WTF we can read a license plate on a vehicle or a face on a man from space for military OPs.

I mean thats just what they tell us, they can do.

But no clear pictures of the gulf!



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by Tempest333


Id say that is to my eyes the correct size and shape also... given the CNN estimate, its still ALOT larger than they are making out.

Thing is, anyone know what the huge underwater plumes are like now and where? would be interesting to see what they look like overlaid with the surface spill.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 09:18 PM
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Based on the size and scale in the picture, could someone possibly calculate how large of an area the oil could spread per day?



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 11:50 PM
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It is a shame that SO many sea creatures were and will be screwed for life, because they were just there doing thier thing... and BP got all lazy and greedy, so a massive oil leak is happening.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by OuttaTime
 



Originally posted by OuttaTime
100,000 x 42 = 4.2 million gallons per day
60 days worth of leakage = 2,520,000,000 gallons in 60 days.
[..]
I believe the photos are consistent with a billion gallon spill, don't you?


Yay! A star to you for using math. In fact, a star for anyone using math!


I do believe the photos are consistent with your math, but rather than expressing opinions, I'd reply in a similar fashion - the universal language of math. Seriously guys, stop underappreciating the stuff. For realsies.

The satellite photo can be viewed in different formats - I downloaded the 250m per pixel version here. The selection in red below circumvents all the clearly visible oil and amounts to around 510,000 pixels. At 250m per pixel, this means we're looking at a surface of 31,875 square kilometers.



Let's be unrealistically optimistic and say the oil visible from space is formed by a layer of just 10cm (~4 inch) thick with only 10% oil (versus 90% water). In that case there would be 0.318 cubic kilometers of oil, or 318,750,000 cubic meters - 318,750,000,000 liter, or 84,204,841,778 gallon, or 2,004,877,185 barrels..

That's very close to the number you calculated [edit: but in barrels instead of gallons..]. However, a layer of just 4 inch consisting of 10% oil is very optimistic..

I just scared myself :/


P.S. It would be awesome if someone could confirm my calculations. Link to full-scale image provided above; I used GIMP to free-select the spill and calculate the size with a macroish thingy found here. The rest is just normal calculation; if one pixel = 250m, I assume that's just one dimension and the surface is actually 250*250 m^2. Et cetera..

[edited to correct math - whoops!]

[edit on 23-6-2010 by scraze]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by havok
What a load of crap from CNN!



Here's what I gathered from the picture in closer examination.
Disregard the first picture, which is just a exaggerated reflection.

Yellow outline is CNN estimates. Source of CNN small 'leak'
Red outline is my guess according to a better look.

Clearly this spill is WAY bigger than what the news would have you believe.


Gotta love satellite imagery!





lol
Did CNN actually draw the yellow part?
Because it just looks funny



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by scraze

Let's be unrealistically optimistic and say the oil visible from space is formed by a layer of just 10cm (~4 inch) thick with only 10% oil (versus 90% water). In that case there would be 0.318 cubic kilometers of oil, or 318,750,000 cubic meters - 318,750,000,000 liter, or 84,204,841,778 gallon, or 2,004,877,185 barrels..

That's very close to the number you calculated [edit: but in barrels instead of gallons..]. However, a layer of just 4 inch consisting of 10% oil is very optimistic..

I just scared myself :/




That was pretty good. I think the obvious result of the math, even if your a bit off, is that there is no way the amount coming out of the well (what they're telling us), does not match the amount of oil in the water.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 07:57 AM
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We'll need to add more oil to our square mile coverage.

Here's todays satellite image.



Notice the oil on the West side of the Missisippi. This is something we didn't see in the original image in the OP.

Here's a close-up




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by scraze
 



Spot on Scraze! Excellent insight!
Now take that amount that currently resides in the Gulf, push it inland...
Then add more on top of that!
No Blue Ocean there!

I wish everyone could read and what is only realize by a few, Sucking up to the Main Stream Media info, their 64+ days behide and counting in telling the truth...

It's still not looking good today.

Even the Bird's are heading North, well for those that can...

Be Wise!
Be Well!

Jesse.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 



Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned
We'll need to add more oil to our square mile coverage.
[..]
Notice the oil on the West side of the Missisippi. This is something we didn't see in the original image in the OP.


Aw no :/! I'm still hoping someone could smash my math, but I've been going over and over it and I can't seem to find any flaws..

I've blended the new photo of June 22nd with the photo of June 19th and added the marking for the new spill. It seems possible that some oil in the new photo was also in the photo of June 19th - would 3 days be enough to travel such a distance? - but it also seems likely that any oil that has been displaced has been replaced as well. So I'll just ignore that possiblity.

Again I've only traced around the easily visible oil, letting out some parts in the process. Here is the blended image with markings:



In the original 250m per pixel image, the second selection (to the left) has a surface of 525,000 pixels, equal to 32,793 square km. Adding the visible oil at Deepwater Horizon with it's 31,875 square km yields a staggering 64,375 square kilometers.

This time, before choosing semi-random variables for layer thickness and volume percentage, I'd like to show how thin this layer would have to be if we only had to account for 100,00 barrels a day (by now the official number, I believe). A 100,00 barrels a day for 64 days is 6,400,000 barrels in total, or 1,017,518,688 liters - or 1,017,519 cubic meters. We have visual confirmation of a surface of at least 31,875 square km or 31,875,000,000 square meter; the only way for a layer with such a surface to turn into a mere million cubic meters is by having a thickness of 3.192 * 10^-5 meter.

That's right - the official numbers correspond to having a layer of oil of just .00003192 m thick - that's .03192 millimeters! To compare, a human hair is between .04 and .25 millimeter thick. If we are to believe the figure of 100,000 barrels a day, then we will also have to believe that the layer of oil visible from space is actually thinner than the human hair.

Of course if we take both spill surfaces into account, we end up with an even thinner layer - .0158 millimeters - which would probably be completely transparent.

Back to the 'normal' calculation: we have a surface of 64,375 square kilometers. Let's up the optimisticness of our values, and say only 1 percent of a layer of 1 cm (0.4 inch) of the marked spill surface actually consists of oil. That still leaves us with 6,437,500 cubic meters = 6,437,500,000 liters = 1,700,607,584 gallons = 40,490,656 barrels. This would correspond to 632,667 barrels each day.

Again, I scared myself
this can't be right!



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by scraze
 


Nice work on merging those two images. There's more. Might as well figure in about 35% of the Gulf has some type of oil.

To me, the sheen is the worst, as it can easily be picked up by a hurricane.

[edit on 23-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by SupremeKnowledge
 


I just realized what that looks like too.
ROLFLMAO!

Good catch!

Ok, now back to being serious.





posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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Can someone explain to me why there are two distinct areas of sheen in the last posted picture? Thanks



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:00 PM
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Hope this image helps in the calculations.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by strangefires


Hope this image helps in the calculations.


Wow.
It's a big as I thought. And that image won't show the sheen. That's just bulk oil. Scary image. Thanks for posting.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:07 PM
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I wonder what will happen during hurricane season? Another Orwellian event, while WE the people are helpless? If the government is doing nothing, what can WE do for help?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:07 PM
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why do we need nasa? can we not google earth?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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And here you only see what's on top... imagine there are also clouds of oil under water, who knows how big they are?



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Jordan River
 


Last time I tried Google earth it showed nothing, I could have seen more of Area 51 than the oil spill.




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