It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is the water temperature rising in the Gulf?

page: 1
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:10 AM
link   
Can we see any kind of temperature increase with the growing spill?

I don't know how to get a reading from the worse areas?

Add a tropical storm or hurricane to this and its almost unthinkable what could happen.

Is it likely this oil spill could affect the weather?




posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:17 AM
link   
I've been asking the same questions even presented them to meteologists but they haven't provide me with an answer yet.


we can't say anything about it yet


call it ignorance, call it dumbness, call it ohw-I-don't-want-to-burn-my-fingers-on-it. We will figure it out when it is too late

IMO there will be some changes, what they are I don't know. I'll be watching this thread



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:27 AM
link   
reply to post by LDragonFire
 


Good question...

Sea surface temperature


Sea surface temperature (SST) is the water temperature close to the surface.

In practical terms, the exact meaning of surface varies according to the measurement method used. A satellite infrared radiometer indirectly measures the temperature of a very thin layer of about 10 micrometres thick (referred to as the skin) of the ocean which leads to the phrase skin temperature (because infrared radiation is emitted from this layer). A microwave instrument measures subskin temperature at about 1 mm. A thermometer attached to a moored or drifting buoy in the ocean would measure the temperature at a specific depth, (e.g. at 1 meter below the sea surface) — this temperature during the day is called temperature of the warm layer.


So gathering information from some different drifting buoy's would be useful..

Logically you would end up on National Data Buoy Center, which unfortunately won't load.......(coincidence??)

National Data Buoy Center

....Anybody living near the gulf and in the possession of a thermometer because I think we won't be getting a lot of help from the government on this one??

Peace




[edit on 22-6-2010 by operation mindcrime]

[edit on 22-6-2010 by operation mindcrime]



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:27 AM
link   
www.buoyweather.com...

This is buoyweather, and it give you all sorts of data, wave heights, sea surface temp, among other things.

It has a 15 day free premium trial. Mine expired and you cant sign up again.

Maybe for someone else?

MM



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:33 AM
link   
This is not hard to figure out people. Take two pieces of plywood, paint one of them black. Put out in full sun, wait a few hours then touch each piece. I promise you the black one will be hotter. I am quite sure the temps where there are large areas of BLACK OIL are hotter.I worry how this is going to affect hurricane season.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by ohioriver
This is not hard to figure out people. Take two pieces of plywood, paint one of them black. Put out in full sun, wait a few hours then touch each piece. I promise you the black one will be hotter. I am quite sure the temps where there are large areas of BLACK OIL are hotter.I worry how this is going to affect hurricane season.


Yes you are right. Oceans are also one of the reasons of good conditions of life, because they reflect radiation back to the atmosphere. With a cover of black, they wont reflect anymore. However im not sure the temperature will pass in a high level to the water below the cover, or stay on it.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:40 AM
link   
The National Data Buoy Center on the NOAA web site www.ndbc.noaa.gov... has a list of all buoys out there. I believe this service is free and you can gather a lot of information here.

AlSayr



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:45 AM
link   
reply to post by AlSayr
 


And that website is loading for you???

When I try it I get a timeout ....

Peace



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:45 AM
link   
The issue is not the rising of the temperature alone, an oil film will seal the water so there will be less evaporation of the water, more heat intensifies hurricanes but without moisture they will die.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 07:06 AM
link   
reply to post by AlSayr
 

AlSayr,

www.ndbc.noaa.gov

No seriously...I can't even get a response from this site if it try to ping or trace it......????

Is it only available from inside the US???

Peace



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 07:10 AM
link   
If you look on the national data buoy center and look at the buoy closest to mexico it was 84.6F and then the temp closer to the oil location is either no data or close to 88F or 89F so maybe the oil has a part in the warming of the water but I have been monitoring the national hurricane center and they are forecasting a tropical depression heading right twards the oil spill and with 88F water it most likely will become a hurricane, but thats just my opinion im not a meteorologist, but this may just be the worst scenario yet.


www.nhc.noaa.gov...



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 07:12 AM
link   

Originally posted by Picao84

Originally posted by ohioriver
This is not hard to figure out people. Take two pieces of plywood, paint one of them black. Put out in full sun, wait a few hours then touch each piece. I promise you the black one will be hotter. I am quite sure the temps where there are large areas of BLACK OIL are hotter.I worry how this is going to affect hurricane season.


Yes you are right. Oceans are also one of the reasons of good conditions of life, because they reflect radiation back to the atmosphere. With a cover of black, they wont reflect anymore. However im not sure the temperature will pass in a high level to the water below the cover, or stay on it.


Simple to find out. Use a light colored trash can, fill with cool water, place a black trash bag over the water and place in full sun. Wait a few hours and check temp. On a side note would be interesting to see if there is condensation on sides of trash can above the black plastic bag.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 07:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by LDragonFire
Can we see any kind of temperature increase with the growing spill?

I don't know how to get a reading from the worse areas?

Add a tropical storm or hurricane to this and its almost unthinkable what could happen.

Is it likely this oil spill could affect the weather?


Consider this. Pre-spill, a surface-cooling evaporative effect would have taken place. Now cover that same body of water with a layer of heavy crude oil and the cooling effect through water vapour evaporation into the atmosphere will be greatly reduced, causing the heat to radiate into the deeper water 'layers'



[edit on 22-6-2010 by timski]



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 07:51 AM
link   
Of course the water is getting hotter. It's summertime in the northern hemisphere.

The question you want to ask is "will the Gulf water be warmer due to the oil spill?".

Overall, the amount of oil compared to the surface area of the gulf, is negligible. A sheen of oil may actually reflect some light which would offset a certain amount of heating. The tar like substance would absorb heat without a doubt. Here is where uncertainty lies for the experts. It will just take time to check data and try to compare it previous years.

Warmer water will mean more clouds, which would provide some cooling. See the problems in trying to determine what is actually happening. It's more involved than reading a thermometer.

The tree huggers will not like this response as there can be no immediate answer on this part of disaster, oh well.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 08:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by ohioriver
Put out in full sun, wait a few hours then touch each piece. I promise you the black one will be hotter.

Yup, even in winter too. I go outside to smoke, and I noticed even when it's like 0° F outside in the winter, a black painted metal door can still be pretty darn hot. I lean against it to keep warm in the winter. It's sad we haven't done anything in our society to harvest that kind of solar energy to heat and power our homes. Excess heat could be stored underground or converted and stored in batteries. It's pretty sad that everything has been designed to rely on oil these days. There really is no reason we need to be using oil, unless our intentions in doing so is to destroy the world one day .. one day soon.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 08:55 AM
link   
This is a brilliant question that up till now i haven't seen asked.

I don't know if the surface conditions have any effect, oil on top would reduce evaporation, but would also reflect sunlight. An overall cooling effect.

But this is dwarfed by the volume of oil that is coming from deep underground, and effectively staying under the surface.

Now this oil from below his likely magnitudes warmer than the water at the bottom of the gulf, although i have no idea how to even guess at numbers.

That heat is being locked into the gulf waters, to be released later. How it affects the local region is still to be seen, but higher average temperature, along with less evaporation would create a hot dry effect.

A single side effect would be the increased amount of positive ions, which do not make for happy people.

I would forecast hot and dry conditions, probably for years to come?



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 10:50 AM
link   
I would say that the answer to that questions is YES!



www.nodc.noaa.gov...

Notice where you can compare current temps with the historical average, the temps right now are 4 to 5 degrees HIGHER than normal.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 02:28 PM
link   
We can finally get some answers, watch this thread presenting the unfolding tropical storm Alex:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 04:41 PM
link   
Thanks for the post


There are many variables to consider, including the dispersants being sprayed causing the oil to be at different depths and not just on the surface.

I never thought the oil could hinder evaporation, but its a possibility., but you would think in a churning sea this coverage would not be uniform.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 09:40 PM
link   
as another poster said....of course the water temperatures are rising...its SUMMER

and from past experience with the 1979 oil spill we know that the oil will have NO effect on the strengh of the Hurricane or Tropical system and just to note....there will be no "oil rain" because crude oil does not evaporate

Thanks




top topics



 
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join