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Toxic Rain in North Carolina????

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posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:50 AM
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reply to post by twitchy
 

oh wow
that goes into a lot of detail on how
to test for pH. I have to make a filter
and use soil samples and everything.
Coffee filters??? lol I have some of those.
My biggest problem is gonna be finding
samples of that rain water. I feel like I'm
on a scavenger hunt, lol.

Like I said I won't be able to give any results
til monday at least, providing I can get a
pH test kit.




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:56 AM
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Looks scary, like some form of blight maybe?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:58 AM
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Maybe you could check any rain gutters and wring out some questionable rainwater from some detritus or something?

Maybe you could get lucky and find a soda pop can that someone used as an ashtray or something that collected some rainwater...?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:58 AM
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could you just use ph paper test strips and water from your bird bath? Would that show anything valid?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:03 AM
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Originally posted by undesirableusername
Looks scary, like some form of blight maybe?


God, I hope not


Once a plant becomes infected, there is no cure and it can also
spread to potatoes.

"This disease can kill tomatoes and potatoes in a week or two. It's
the same disease that caused the Irish potato famine some 160
years ago,"
said Eric Oesterling of the Penn State Cooperative
Extension.


www.thepittsburghchannel.com...



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:07 AM
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Originally posted by Alethea
could you just use ph paper test strips and water from your bird bath? Would that show anything valid?

I don't know.
I'll have to wait to find a pH test kit
and see what is required. I was just
reading those things off from a prior
link somebody posted from here.

www.lamotte.com...



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by guavas
Maybe you could check any rain gutters and wring out some questionable rainwater from some detritus or something?

Maybe you could get lucky and find a soda pop can that someone used as an ashtray or something that collected some rainwater...?


Bad ideas, gutters are usually aluminum, wringing water out from dirt, soda pop cans used as ashtrays(?) These are a great way to contaminate the sample before you test it.
I linked to the wrong page apparently that was for testing soil samples instead of the rain itself.
Get something made from a food grade plastic or clean glass and catch the rain as it falls, anything that rain hits before it's collected can potentially skewer your results and just dip a litmus paper test strip in it, or use an aquarium type PH test kit. Sorry about the previous link, testing the water is alot easier.

(avoid that concrete bird bath too, it will test alkaline)

[edit on 20-6-2010 by twitchy]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by guavas
Maybe you could check any rain gutters and wring out some questionable rainwater from some detritus or something?

Maybe you could get lucky and find a soda pop can that someone used as an ashtray or something that collected some rainwater...?

like I said I'll look around tomorrow
but I doubt I find any as dry as it has
been here, rain pretty much just sinks
into the ground like a sponge and it
dehydrates into the air very fast.
But I will check



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:16 AM
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Sorry, but I have to call BS on this one.

Perhaps someone has hijacked Boondock Saint's account.

Firstly,


There was a stench, foul odor to this rain that
didn't sit well with my stomach. I didn't think
too much about it til I finished my lunch and got
up and looked at the plants, shrubs and fruit
bearing trees and bushes and I noticed something
that turned my stomach even more.



So you're out there having your lunch and there is a foul smell. A STENCH.

It doesn't sit well with your stomach, but you go on to finish your lunch?

Secondly,



I could not
believe my eyes. I grabbed my camera and took
some photos for you to take a look at.


So, it's a "hard" rain, and still raining by the time you finished your lunch, ('cos you don't say otherwise) and you grabbed your camera and started taking pics for us to look at. Did you change your mind and post some other pics instead, 'cos the ones you posted show no evidence of any recent rain. Certainly not photographed during a downpour.

Thirdly,



This stuff eats right through the leaf over time. That's toxic.


How much time? the time it takes to eat your lunch with a clothes peg on your nose?

The whole point to your story, as I see it, is that this damage occurred from 1 rain shower out of 6 in the space of two weeks.

If the pictures were taken during this rain shower, how do you account for the distinctly different stages of damage in your pictures. Which, I might add, you've identified and colour-coded.

And then, when posters try and help to answer your urgent (4 question marks) question, these are your responses:


The rain has dried up so I'll have
to wait to get another sample.




lol
like I have a sterile jar lying around to put it in.
I wished !!!



It's too dark right now, I'll have to wait til tomorrow
to see if there is any leftover rain but I may have to
put it in a ziploc bag. May not be worth testing from
the doggie dish and other places might already be
contaminated. But I'll check.

I can go back and find the leaves, however I wanted
to leave them there long enough to see if they too
indeed burn holes into the ones that were yellow today.
I hope I can find them again. There's a lot of bushes
to sort through for 1 person.



first of all I did not want to touch it
and I didn't have any tools to scrape
with. I'll have to try that tomorrow.

I love the last one. No tools..lol

Sounds like you're really eager to solve this mystery!
Suddenly it's too dark, too many bushes, rain's all dried up already, no tools...

Or someone is having fun with your account...

Regards





[edit on 20-6-2010 by V1g0r0u5]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:17 AM
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If you really want to no what is wrong take some leafs to your local Co-Op. When we ran a orchard and did not no what was going on we would ask them thats what they are there for. The peach that is rotten looks like brown rot not sure though. Hope its some something fungal or some kind of disease rather then from BP

North Carolina COOP



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by V1g0r0u5
Sorry, but I have to call BS on this one.


well you have a right to call it what you wish.
That's your opinion.
As you can find whatever reasons you want
to disbelieve or discredit this event.
It still doesn't change the facts. But I will
say that twisting my words around to suit your
agenda is childish in my opinion.

best wishes



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:25 AM
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Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is commonly known, occurs when emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) react in the atmosphere with water, oxygen, and oxidants to form various acidic compounds. These compounds then fall to the earth in either dry form (such as gas and particles) or wet form (such as rain, snow, and fog).


Based on these statements I would think IF it were acid rain, it would be from the Iceland volcano, not the gulf catastophe

edit to add:


Two Forms of Acid Deposition



Wet deposition is any form of precipitation that removes acids from the atmosphere and deposits them on the Earth’s surface. Dry deposition polluting particles and gases stick to the ground via dust and smoke in the absence of precipitation. This form of deposition is dangerous however because precipitation can eventually wash acid pollutants into streams, lakes, and rivers





Today, acid deposition is present in the northeastern United States, southeastern Canada, and much of Europe including portions of Sweden, Norway, and Germany. In addition, parts of North East Asia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Southern India are all in danger of being impacted by acid deposition in the future.


[edit on 20-6-2010 by space cadet]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by labzrule
If you really want to no what is wrong take some leafs to your local Co-Op. When we ran a orchard and did not no what was going on we would ask them thats what they are there for. The peach that is rotten looks like brown rot not sure though. Hope its some something fungal or some kind of disease rather then from BP

North Carolina COOP

now a question

if it is something that's gonna cause
a famine or spread like a disease,
I don't know if I want to be the first
guinea pig they use to follow this thing.
We like our privacy around here.
If somebody else comes down with it first
I probably will report ours. But I don't
wanna be first. I mean this disease didn't
just start with our lil farm, it had to come from
somewhere. That means others have it too.
I think I'm just gonna use the pH test for now.

edit for spelling

[edit on 20-6-2010 by boondock-saint]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


I think I gave good reasons why I thought your post is BS.
I used quotes from your posts.

Hardly twisting your words.

Rather than insult me, explain the points I brought up.


Regards



[edit on 20-6-2010 by V1g0r0u5]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by space cadet
Based on these statements I would think IF it were acid rain, it would be from the Iceland volcano, not the gulf catastophe

there was a link earlier I read that said that
methane leaks, oil or burning of oil can cause
acid rain as well. I am much more inclined to
believe the gulf caused this than I am an Iceland
volcano half way around the world did.
But I may be wrong.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:36 AM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


I can respect that you want your privacy. Just thrown some ideas out to help you out. Take care and good luck!!!



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:43 AM
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Originally posted by labzrule
I can respect that you want your privacy. Just thrown some ideas out to help you out. Take care and good luck!!!

I do appreciate that

I need all the ideas I can muster.
I'll do some more checking later
today when it gets daylight.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:44 AM
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I dont think this has anything to do with the oil leak. I live in FL and I have seen leaves like this many times in all the stages you pointed out. I dont know what it is but I have seen it here.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:48 AM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver
I dont think this has anything to do with the oil leak. I live in FL and I have seen leaves like this many times in all the stages you pointed out. I dont know what it is but I have seen it here.

have you seen it lately???
Did it kill the plant life it was on???
Did it damage fruit and vegetables???
How widespread was it???



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:52 AM
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Looks like Black Spot to me as well ... There are resistant cultivars. It has lots of pet plants, and you can do a great deal to assist your other plants by employing "good gardening and hygiene practices" even plants appreciate not getting extra bugs to cope with whether micro or macro.

There are sprays, and one I am particularly fond of is Dormant Oil Spray .. it also controls over wintering insects (not that you have a great deal of winter) ... but there are organic light oil sprays as well.

on the Gulf thing .. I don't know what the by products of flaming methane are .. (do you?) ... however this was in my to read list today:




A BP spokesman said the company was burning about 30 million cubic feet of natural gas daily from the source of the leak, adding up to about 450 million cubic feet since the containment effort started 15 days ago. That's enough gas to heat about 450,000 homes for four days.

But that figure does not account for gas that eluded containment efforts and wound up in the water, leaving behind huge amounts of methane. BP PLC said a containment cap sitting over the leaking well funneled about 619,500 gallons of oil to a drillship waiting on the ocean surface on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, a specialized flare siphoning oil and gas from a stack of pipes on the seafloor burned roughly 161,700 gallons.


Liquid gallons? ""161,700 gallons"" ... that is a LOT of methane gas.

It is something to think about, anyway.

Your peaches look great!! You can or freeze or just gobble them up?




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