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Mantle Plume detected under Southern Africa

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posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 03:06 PM
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Scary I know but it doesn't seem to be anything to worry about.

I always thought that these things could be a hidden threat no one would ever know about but it looks like they aren't that hard to detect. I also figured these things would move a lot faster than 4 inches a year. Oh well I know a lot of people are alarmed with the phenomenon of mantle plumes so hopefully this can help ease fears a little bit.

I provided a link to the actual study too, but you have to pay 9 dollars to read the Geophysical research letters publication.

If anyone is subscribed, I would appreciate if they mentioned how far down the plume is
Mantle Plume


www.agu.org...

I couldn't really find anything else. Searching on google leads to lots of studies of ancient large igneous provinces in Africa.


[edit on 19-6-2010 by thedarklingthrush]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by thedarklingthrush]




posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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Thank you for posting this


I knew about Africa getting torn apart but is it because continental drift or could it be because this plume is pushing it apart ?

What I know is this:

Africa has been like it is now for millions of years according to continental drift theory.
I don't know if it moved much like other continents have done but I know that the weight of a big continent pushes everything deeper in the Earth's mantle. The pressure would create excess heat that makes it a weak spot where the inner Earth can travel through easier.

Could be wrong tho.

I think an expanding Earth still has a few things ahead.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 


I think the "breaking" in Africa is more to the north, near the Red sea, so I guess this is not related to that.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:11 PM
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I believe the accepted scientific theory is that Africa is being pulled apart by plate tectonics, if I had to guess I would say the plume is influenced by the rift in Eastern Africa and not the other way around.

The article mentioned its angling towards the rift. Most likely is this just the easiest way for all the stuff to make its way towards the surface, the path of least resistance.

I've got two pictures here showing the relevant area where the rift is located (Kaapvaal) and the various sections of the East African Rift(it actually extends, in separate parts down the whole of Africa)








This could eventually result in some sort of African rift related volcanic activity but not for a few thousands of years, this stuff moves really slow and its really deep.

[edit on 19-6-2010 by thedarklingthrush]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by thedarklingthrush]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by thedarklingthrush]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


It says here it is heading for the east African rift.

The newfound mid-mantle plume is angling up toward the East African Rift - a chasm in eastern Africa that's been growing due to the African continental plate ripping apart. The study could help scientists understand the characteristics and dynamics of structures in the lower mantle as well as the geology of the southern African region.


Keep in mind that the Earth's interior covers a lot of distance. The surface as well as the continents are just a small distance in a trip to the core.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by thedarklingthrush
 


What is the cause of the rift ? In the Atlantic there is an obvious line where new rock pushes outwards. But the part of Northern Africa is almost going head on with that movement.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
reply to post by thedarklingthrush
 


What is the cause of the rift ? In the Atlantic there is an obvious line where new rock pushes outwards. But the part of Northern Africa is almost going head on with that movement.


It's two plates pulling apart.

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...

Its a confusing subject since the field isn't completely understood. Plate tectonics has only been around since the 70's and its pretty difficult to study something that takes millions of years to do anything significant, in a human lifetime

There's also an alternate theory that offers to fill some of the holes left, but it leads to many new ones. It looks like its already popped up in the thread. Personally I think its bunk,

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by thedarklingthrush
 


Thanks


I'd like you to take a look at a thread I've made recently. It is called :
The Expanding Earth hypothesis.

Dr. Maxlow is not part of the wiki page.
I've posted his lecture ( *videos*)as well of his written thesis on the theory.
A lot of interesting links in the replies to.

After Maxlow his explanation the African rift looks as if it fits better in the expanding theory IMO.
Honestly they are both flawed and maybe they are both partially true.

[edit on 6/19/2010 by Sinter Klaas]

[edit on 6/19/2010 by Sinter Klaas]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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I read this just now.


The distance from the surface of Earth to the center is about 3,963 miles (6,378 kilometers). Much of Earth is fluid. The mostly solid skin of the planet is only 41 miles (66 kilometers) thick -- thinner than the skin of an apple, relatively speaking.



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