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Circadian Clock in Pancreas Directly Linked to Diabetes

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posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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Circadian Clock in Pancreas Directly Linked to Diabetes


www.sciencedaily.com

ScienceDaily (June 18, 2010) — The pancreas has its own molecular clock. Now, for the first time, a Northwestern University study has shown this ancient circadian clock regulates the production of insulin. If the clock is faulty, the result is diabetes.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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Natural human biochemical rhythms were never associated with diabetes before?

The body's concept of night and day, periods of rest and activity, have not been suspected of having something to do with this disease.?

In other words, Doctor's never thought, or needed "proof" that a normal and consistent daily routine was a contributory factor in such health-related issues. Yet our consumer lifestyle is inconsistent with this maxim.

Energy drinks, stimulants (of a number of varieties), glorification of physical excess, all takes us away from such mundane things as waking up, eating right, and getting good rest.

Will they now develop another petrochemical (and thus patentable) solution? Will they create mandates that reclassify natural or homeopathic solutions as 'controlled?.

I know it's not simply an OP to expose the development of this medical 'knowledge.' But I thought it is worth noting.

www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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Interesting Max, Would this study include type one?
two lines



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:25 PM
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It is amazing how much better my own body feels on a camping trip where you naturally synchronize to the light/dark cycles. I almost always lose weight even on short (~week) trips even though there is food and beer galore. (And I am not big to begin with, but any extra weight just comes right off)

I have been staying up waaaaaay too late lately, because of artificial light and the magnetic attraction of the interwebz, and this thread has motivated me to try to get back into a more natural sleep pattern. I knew it was bad for me, for other reasons, (it revs my brain into high gear and makes it hard to unwind) and the idea that it may contribute to diabetes just added one more pressing reason to stop it.




posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:32 PM
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The body needs rest as well as a healthy diet and some exercise.....

However boring, a routine is what the human body clock and so health requires.

That said I read a report a while ago that stated some people are Genetically pre-disposed to working at night and that thier body clocks are 'switched' to working at night and resting at day..

I guess the key is knowing which !!

I also know that the Liver as an organ normally starts its 'cleansing' cycle around 11pm which is why drinking alcohol or coffee, tea and other stimulants is a bad idea as that overwhelms the Liver as it try's to clean the blood and the body for the next day..

Finally, I now that there is a HUGE amount of study about Diabetes and Pharma companies are spending BIG trying to look for ways of preventing or reversing the illness. They know that there is a big potential future market out there.

Me, I think the best defence is moderation and adequate rest .....

I'll try and get an early night tonight I think....
Regards
PurpleDog UK



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:47 PM
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For years my husband has worked nights or graveyard. I always adjust my sleep schedule to his. I actually prefer to sleep days and be awake at night. Less than two years ago, we moved and he has been on a normal day routine. I still have problems staying awake during the day and falling asleep at night. Two months ago, I was diagnosed with adult onset type II diabetes. This study makes perfect sense.

typos

[edit on 6/19/2010 by darkelf]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by PurpleDog UK
 



You are absolutely correct about boring routines.

I think as we became industrialized as a civilization, those who extracted the wealth from the enterprise caused their labor to engage in physically (if not mentally), damaging activities, with total disregard for the human need of allowing the person to determine when and how to balance themselves. Commerce became more important than health.

We acquiesced to the notion for reasons which will lead off topic, but nevertheless, it seems evident that the information is now becoming self-evident - you can't sit someone down for 8-9-10 hours and have them listen to people complaining. You can't have a person inserting a widget into a doohickey over and over. It's deadly in the long term.

My problem is of course, rather than solve that equation, the 'medical industry' will yield to the urge to create an external substance to insert into people to keep them in high-productivity mode, despite the unnatural pressures it applies on the labor force. Unnatural pressure is the cause of unnatural response.

If people were more valued, and more cherished, they would realize the insulting nature of the term and application of "Human Resources" is in business.

So as a society we get sicker, and they push us further. The simple solution, balanced diet (which is nearly unavailable to most who think they ARE eating a balanced diet), adequate rest (as dictated not by a mechanical clock, or an artificial deadline) taken when needed, not when convenient, and self-enriching experiences in daily activities is the cure. And it should be free.

Sigh..... Thanks for the input everyone.... I wasn't sure anyone would be interested in this.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
Interesting Max, Would this study include type one?
two lines


There will always be genetic components, as our physical form makes inevitable (for now.) I suspect that the propensity or susceptibility to the ailment is a sub-component of it manifesting itself.

But the technology and understanding to actually 'cure' that would be akin to that which would be needed to halt aging. We don't have it. (or do we?)

I wonder, if in ancient times, before we had a more common understanding of the concept of disease, families or small tribes didn't consider such things as 'family curses?' Talk about insult to injury, not only have you a condition which eludes your understanding or control, but society stigmatizes you over it. But I digress.....



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


MY daughter is type one I try and keep up on the latest info, there is the transplanting of islets, but you need rejection drugs,

Some Drs say a virus can trigger the auto immune disorder, interestingly she had spinal meningitis before she became diabetic.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by darkelf
 


I am sorry darkelf, are you doing well with diet and exercise?

For type two there are foods that can stimulate the production of insulin.



[edit on 013030p://bSaturday2010 by Stormdancer777]

[edit on 013030p://bSaturday2010 by Stormdancer777]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by Maxmars

I think as we became industrialized as a civilization, those who extracted the wealth from the enterprise caused their labor to engage in physically (if not mentally), damaging activities, with total disregard for the human need of allowing the person to determine when and how to balance themselves. Commerce became more important than health.



Someday you should make a thread on the topic, I would love your take on why we acquiesced.

On this, I completely agree. I could not agree more. We keep acting as if we are supposed to make the human animal good for society, rather than questioning why we do not tailor society to the human animal. An intelligent being would build a chair to fit its own body, not build something and then cut off its legs or some other body part to make the chair workable, and yet thats exactly what we do in terms of this society. We sacrifice our humanity for productivity.

It is not wonder we abuse our dairy cows, and pump them full of hormones to increase production and milk them til their teats are full of pus. Thats exactly the way we work humans, (on the whole.) Sick? Work anyway. Grieving? Get over it and make that deadline. Suicidal because your life is a meaningless unhappy grind? Here take a happy pill, and get back to work.

We are domesticated animals for the PTB.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 



Originally posted by Stormdancer777
reply to post by darkelf
 


I am sorry darkelf, are you doing well with diet and exercise?

For type two there are foods that can stimulate the production of insulin.



Diet exercise and metformin. In two months I have adjusted my glucose levels in the 97 to 120 range. Plus I've lost 12 lbs.

I hadn't heard of foods that could stimulate insulin production. I'll have to look into this. Thanks



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