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Amidst all the controversy over the oil spill, 2000 die in Kyrgizistan

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posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 03:38 AM
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A million people have been affected by the recent violence in Kyrgyzstan, United Nations officials said yesterday, as the country's interim leader admitted that more than 2,000 people may have died in the clashes.

Clashes between ethnic Uzbeks and Kyrgyz in the south of the troubled Central Asian state began last weekend, and the situation in and around the city of Osh is still tense. source


This forum has been flooded by news about the oil spill in the Gulf for the past few weeks, leaving little attention for other atrocities that take place elsewhere. In comparison to the spill, I guess these other disasters are of minor concern to the US mainstream media.

It is estimated that 2000 people have died so far. I've just watched the Dutch news and saw a woman telling how her mother and daughter were murdered. They also showed a sixteen years old girl, she apparently got raped by a number of men with her dad forced to watch.

This story made me instantly think of the horror stories we heard after Yugoslavia ethnic clashes, but I doubt Kyrgyzstan is on the agenda to be ''liberated''. Unless Russia intervenes, it wouldn't surprise me if we'll witness another Darfur while standing idly by, I at least don't expect the UN to intervene anytime soon.

Let's put things in perspective, the spill is one big disaster, but especially here at ATS, we should not forget about all the other atrocities taking place.


[edit on 19-6-2010 by Mdv2]




posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by Mdv2
 


Before the oil get to all our heads, we need to remember this story and keep it alive. As we begin to realise the full extent of this atrocity, I am sure the death toll and ethnic tensions will continue to rise. It is the first time that I have seen the figure of 2,000 dead talked about.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:03 AM
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How is this our problem?

Let the Russians handle it. Or is this somehow our fault too? Just like everything else in the world.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:07 AM
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Originally posted by minute2midnight
How is this our problem?

Let the Russians handle it. Or is this somehow our fault too? Just like everything else in the world.


No one is apportioning blame and I am sure Russia will intervene at some stage. Failing that, NATO would need to get involved if ethnic tensions spill over into war and genocide. It could lead to unwanted destabilization at a time we least need it in that region.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:17 AM
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Originally posted by LarryLove
No one is apportioning blame and I am sure Russia will intervene at some stage. Failing that, NATO would need to get involved if ethnic tensions spill over into war and genocide. It could lead to unwanted destabilization at a time we least need it in that region.



Originally posted by Mdv2
In comparison to the spill, I guess these other disasters are of minor concern to the US mainstream media.

....

This story made me instantly think of the horror stories we heard after Yugoslavia ethnic clashes, but I doubt Kyrgyzstan is on the agenda to be ''liberated''. Unless Russia intervenes, it wouldn't surprise me if we'll witness another Darfur while standing idly by, I at least don't expect the UN to intervene anytime soon.


Thinly veiled maybe, but sounds like blame to me none the less.

NATO and in particular the U.S. doesn't need to do squat, nor should we, it's not our problem.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:24 AM
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reply to post by minute2midnight
 


I believe this story has equal right to mainstream media coverage than any other. Behind the scenes, the Russians might be playing some clever games. Watch this space. Don't worry, this will be a European affair in the end!



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by minute2midnight
 


No need for self-pity, there is no plausible reason to blame this on the US or anyone else for the matter.

It's just a very sad situation that the US mainstream media has paid almost exclusively attention for the oil spill while thousands of people are being massacred elsewhere. Now I don't expect anything else from the mainstream media, all that matters to them is viewer ratings and the oil spill sells better than some butchery in a country most people have probably never heard of, but we may expect more from ATS: this troublesome disaster deserves our sincere attention.

Saying it's not your problem might be true, but it certainly is your government's problem. If you are the world's policeman you cannot take a day off because you have some serious issues at home to deal with.








[edit on 19-6-2010 by Mdv2]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:32 AM
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Originally posted by minute2midnight
How is this our problem?

Let the Russians handle it. Or is this somehow our fault too? Just like everything else in the world.


Kyrgyzstan is independent state, with US base the only remaining one in the region, that serves the troops in Afghanistan.

The Russians will handle it, one should not doubt about that!




Thanks for that thread. indeed the things must be put in the correct perspective. If tomorrow 2000 die in the Mexican Gulf as a result of Methane explosion, we all will be rightfully concerned. By the way, move away from the Gulf and East/West coasts ASAP. The things will never go back to normal.

www.disclose.tv...

If only a portion of what the Camelot conference says is correct, terrible development comes to the Gulf!!!

www.disclose.tv...


[edit on 19-6-2010 by Gliese581]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 06:13 AM
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Originally posted by minute2midnight


NATO and in particular the U.S. doesn't need to do squat, nor should we, it's not our problem.


There is a US base in a place called Manas near the capital I believe.

www.telegraph.co.uk...


The interim government extended the lease on the Manas airbase by a year shortly after taking power in April. The base is a crucial supply hub for Afghanistan

This is a really complicated situation but it does appear that the NATO/US base has been an aggrivating factor.

There is some sort of Jihadist uprising going on in the south among the uzbek population and being supported by islamists across the border in Uzbekistan.

This is a region of extreme importance to NATO/US global designs.

I'm gonna do some more reading see what else I can find out.

EDIT to fix link

[edit on 19-6-2010 by bobjohnson]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by bobjohnson]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by bobjohnson]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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This is just how the Muslims handle internal squabbles, why should we care? Oh yea, because we aren't Muslims and still have a few tattered shreds of Judeo-Christian values left.

Watch this carefully folks because this is coming to your county and city once TPTB flood our countries with islamo-fascist immigrants.

The war is not fought with guns but with ideas.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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I never even heard of those places. That's one thing I love about ATS, I learn so much and am made aware of so many things I normally wouldn't be aware of. Wow people just can't get along anywhere. Sad.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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Perhaps, what is occurring has to do with the Bank of International Settlements.

It may be that our friends didn't want a central bank owned by a private group of individuals beholding to the above linked International body. The last few hold-outs are being brought into the fold.

Check the site out Crises by Design to get a better idea what I'm talking about.

I'm wondering if perhaps Iran is holding out and if Iraq and Afghanistan also refused private central banks.

Definitely a tragedy.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by minute2midnight
 


I agree. We need to be over in Afghanistan getting that oil...errr...getting the billion dollar minerals...errr...wait what are we doing over there again?



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 05:01 AM
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Originally posted by TheFinalTruth14
reply to post by minute2midnight
 


I agree. We need to be over in Afghanistan getting that oil...errr...getting the billion dollar minerals...errr...wait what are we doing over there again?


I don't know, and I don't give a damn. We should be over here protecting our borders and our citizens. To hell with the Afghans, and Uzbeks, and Iraqis and every other ungrateful p.o.s. over there. If we go to help, we're invaders just there for the oil, or poppy fields. If we don't, we get blamed for not going to help. To hell with them all.


[edit on 6/21/2010 by minute2midnight]



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 11:06 AM
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Neither is a trivial thing

and neither should be used to diminish the other.

They are just different kinds of castastrophes.

I will add that many report that illegal drug profiteers are instigating some of the needless violence there.

Americans are locally oriented, as are most people.

What is going on in Kyrgyzstan is more specifically a human social disaster, that reveals an underlying problem we see throughout the globe, of clashing group identities.
But in this case it may have been started &/or amplified by those who don't want their power & profits diminished.

Just because only (?) 11 people have seen immediate death in the Gulf disaster the effects on both people & equally on tens of millions of wild creatures does not diminish my outrage at it.
People should live with nature, partly because they are dependent on it, & not think we have some artificial 'right' to overwhelm &/or destroy it.

The interesting possible common theme in both may be profiting by unscrupulous elements.
Also it is the lasting ruin inflicted on people's lives that permeates both situations in addition to the loss of thousands of lives.
In Kyrgystan it may include political & social & military profiteering as well as monetary.
In the gulf it is more about monetary profiteering,
because the oil companies already control/own the mercenary US military & law officials.

[edit on 21-6-2010 by slank]



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