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Three weeks in Brazilian slum warfare

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posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:33 AM
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A side to Brazil that I wasn't aware of. Reporter Khaled Kazziha spends three weeks in one of Rio de Janeiro's most notorious slums, where drug lords run what is effectively a parallel state, and uncovers the reality of a devastating war that is claiming the lives of innocent bystanders as well as policemen and traffickers.

Part 1



Part 2



Part 3





posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:49 AM
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Interesting videos, I wounder how many people have to get killed before they legalize drugs.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:53 AM
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Originally posted by CREAM
Interesting videos, I wounder how many people have to get killed before they legalize drugs.


And there's a big and important debate. Drug legalization. It has been proven to work in other countries.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 03:32 AM
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The drugs in Brazil are legal for all effective purposes. For if you can find illegal drugs anywhere, then what law opposes you. Drug legalization only works in countries with true Christian morality. Brazil does not highlight that “Drugs are good”. It highlights that when you allow the criminally minded degenerates of a society free reign over any territory, then utter chaos and misery will result. Do they use their drug money for schools? Of course not. Instead, they fund drinking and drug binges in the streets for free. That is, the first time it is free. Next time, after you're possibly hooked on cocain, you will have to pay and pay dearly.

Do they help start and run new businesses in Brazil to provide the needed jobs thier slums desire? Of course not. Do they promote security and safety for their users in the slums? Anything but. In fact, from this video, I saw no value whatsoever of the criminal gangs. They only remind of a parisitic virus that always infects a society when they allow it.

But society will not harbor them for much longer. History will repeat itself, I am sure. Just as the technology for war has made war itself an effort in futility, violent criminal gangs of this nature as well can be made futile. It is only the will of the majority of the state that need to be enacted. It takes much to enact the good nature of the majority, but if you study history, then you will see the certainty of our moment in history. The falling of the hammer of the state for justice will be, as it always has been in history, like the swift and absolute destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. But we, unlike GOD, perform retribution in the name of the supposed justice we state that we seek when the time comes that we choose to act. And so, the aftermath of our cleansing will be in the form of overwheling tyranny of government and the absolute Holocaust of those that oppose it.

In time, when the people of Brazil, and indeed the world, has had enough of murderous thugs and gangs, they will take back their countries in force and put virtually all to the sword, innocent and guilty alike. In my opinion, the world is about to see Nero's destruction of Israel on a scale never before witnessed by the hills and mountains of the earth. Technology, in its brutal efficiency, will make short work of the criminal gangs of our time. They will either fall in line or be completely destroyed, there will be no alternative. It is only the will of the people that need be spurred into action.

Soon, the criminals will venture out of their slums and ghettos and into the territories of the state's tax coffers of tourist beaches and fine hotels. And when the criminals venture too far into the territories of the elite, then they will be utterly destroyed by the overwhelming military backlash that ensues. Need I remind you of the folly of Pablo Escobar, Saddam Hussein, and Manuel Noriega? Either war or tyranny will soon oppress the world and either one can and will destroy all criminal elements but that of the state.

Barrak Obama's Brown Shirt Army may come to light sonner than expected in these times of ecconomic disaster and the inevitable rise in crime that always follows.

[edit on 19-6-2010 by Hot_Wings]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 04:55 AM
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Originally posted by Hot_Wings
The drugs in Brazil are legal for all effective purposes. For if you can find illegal drugs anywhere, then what law opposes you. Drug legalization only works in countries with true Christian morality. Brazil does not highlight that “Drugs are good”. It highlights that when you allow the criminally minded degenerates of a society free reign over any territory, then utter chaos and misery will result. Do they use their drug money for schools? Of course not. Instead, they fund drinking and drug binges in the streets for free. That is, the first time it is free. Next time, after you're possibly hooked on cocain, you will have to pay and pay dearly.

Do they help start and run new businesses in Brazil to provide the needed jobs thier slums desire? Of course not. Do they promote security and safety for their users in the slums? Anything but. In fact, from this video, I saw no value whatsoever of the criminal gangs. They only remind of a parisitic virus that always infects a society when they allow it.

But society will not harbor them for much longer. History will repeat itself, I am sure. Just as the technology for war has made war itself an effort in futility, violent criminal gangs of this nature as well can be made futile. It is only the will of the majority of the state that need to be enacted. It takes much to enact the good nature of the majority, but if you study history, then you will see the certainty of our moment in history. The falling of the hammer of the state for justice will be, as it always has been in history, like the swift and absolute destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. But we, unlike GOD, perform retribution in the name of the supposed justice we state that we seek when the time comes that we choose to act. And so, the aftermath of our cleansing will be in the form of overwheling tyranny of government and the absolute Holocaust of those that oppose it.

In time, when the people of Brazil, and indeed the world, has had enough of murderous thugs and gangs, they will take back their countries in force and put virtually all to the sword, innocent and guilty alike. In my opinion, the world is about to see Nero's destruction of Israel on a scale never before witnessed by the hills and mountains of the earth. Technology, in its brutal efficiency, will make short work of the criminal gangs of our time. They will either fall in line or be completely destroyed, there will be no alternative. It is only the will of the people that need be spurred into action.

Soon, the criminals will venture out of their slums and ghettos and into the territories of the state's tax coffers of tourist beaches and fine hotels. And when the criminals venture too far into the territories of the elite, then they will be utterly destroyed by the overwhelming military backlash that ensues. Need I remind you of the folly of Pablo Escobar, Saddam Hussein, and Manuel Noriega? Either war or tyranny will soon oppress the world and either one can and will destroy all criminal elements but that of the state.

Barrak Obama's Brown Shirt Army may come to light sonner than expected in these times of ecconomic disaster and the inevitable rise in crime that always follows.

[edit on 19-6-2010 by Hot_Wings]


Just one observation. Brazil is one of the most christian countries you will find in the world and probably the country with the largest number of catholics.

As for Rio de Janeiro, I always tell me friends from other countries, if you want to visit Brazil DONT GO TO RIO. I hate Rio de Janeiro. There are many other places to go. We are the 5th largest country in the world and we have a huge coastal area. There are so many places people can go to. Forget about Rio.

We, brazilians, are well aware of the violence. Believe me, the druglords will remain there in the slums for a loooooooooooong time. Maybe one day I will write an article about it. We call it a civil war and the whole picture is way too complex. Too many variables. There is corruption in politics, in the police, in the penitenciary system and so on.

Ever watched the movie "Tropa de Elite"? It's a nice police action movie about our special forcers entering the slums to fight against the druglords. It paints a tiny part of the picture.

There is ANOTHER problem. Try telling people in Rio de Janeiro that their city is violent. Dude, they are crazy. They love Rio so much and go to used to their violence, that they will tell you Rio is not violent and that it is like any other city. They are brainwashed. It's crazy. Even us, brazilians, can't understand how they can live with that.

It is really sad. In so many levels.

EDIT: As for the druglords leaving the slums, don't count on it. They are not that strong. The rule the slums and that's it. Some slums are so big they ahve tens of thousands of people living in them. When the police attempts to invade the slums, the people who live there, they sometimes have to heklp the druglords or get killed by them. It's like in Iraq, where the US army never knows when a civilian could actually be an insurgent.

But once they leave the slums, they are out in the open and an easy target. It's not even their intention to leave the slums. They prefer to stay there.
[edit on 19-6-2010 by henriquefd]

[edit on 19-6-2010 by henriquefd]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:01 AM
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reply to post by henriquefd
 


Your comments about Rio are interesting. Okay, I will take your advice and when I finally get to go to Brazil I will avoid Rio and learn the culture in different areas. I did see that film, some time ago now. This might sound like a truly naive question, but how representative of Rio is the film Cidade de Deus?



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 05:33 AM
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Originally posted by LarryLove
reply to post by henriquefd
 


Your comments about Rio are interesting. Okay, I will take your advice and when I finally get to go to Brazil I will avoid Rio and learn the culture in different areas. I did see that film, some time ago now. This might sound like a truly naive question, but how representative of Rio is the film Cidade de Deus?



Rio de Janeiro is the second biggest city in Brazil. We are talking about more than 6 million people in a 1,182 square kilometers area.

The movie is obviously touching on a specific aspect of Rio and what it addresses it does so brilliantly. There is a lot more to Rio than that, but that part you see on the movie is very true.

EDIT: The name "Cidade de Deus" which translates literally to "City of God" is not a nickname to the city of Rio. That's the name of a city area. It has around 40.000 people.

Also, mind you that the movie shows a story in the 60s and 70s. But many of what you see there still exists today, if it is not worse.

[edit on 19-6-2010 by henriquefd]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 06:02 AM
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There's another video about the same area, its called Ross Kemp on Gangs, De Janerio. He talks to some gang members and tries to understand their culture. The gangs have G3's, FAL's, and even rocket launchers, all for fighting eachother and the police down there. Its on youtube, only about 50 minutes long.

Ive never thought an area would have that much firepower, considering they are just regular street gangs. The favilla's (sp) are one place I would never go to ever in my life.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 06:12 AM
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In the video, the actual standard of life in the neighborhood itself doesn't look so bad...I've spent time in plenty of places in Asia that have similar houses, streets, population densities, etc. But of course you can't tell everything from a video. Nevertheless, looking at those video, it seems that VIOLENCE (rather than poverty itself) is the real problem. If this is true, perhaps if the people of the slums can overcome their violence, they might have hope for a happy life. I will be wishing all the best for the people of this slum and say a prayer for them.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 01:09 PM
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Thanks for the link. I once saw a documentary that focused on the elite police force that routinely operates in the favellas of Rio de Janeiro, though I can't remember the name of it. It's a complex situation for sure.

I'm surprised this thread hasn't gotten more stars & flags, considering the response it's gotten so far.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by Son of Will
Thanks for the link. I once saw a documentary that focused on the elite police force that routinely operates in the favellas of Rio de Janeiro, though I can't remember the name of it. It's a complex situation for sure.

I'm surprised this thread hasn't gotten more stars & flags, considering the response it's gotten so far.


They are called BOPE(Batalhão de Operações Policiais Especiais).

BOPE OFFICIAL WEBSITE
PS: You must allow pop-ups to enter the website.


[edit on 19-6-2010 by henriquefd]



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