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A Question on the Moons Movement

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posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 09:38 PM
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Couple of days ago the Moon was right next to Venus.

Today the Moon is farther to the South not even close to Venus.

How can it travel that far South in just a few Days? I would think the Moon would be lower or higher, but not more to the left or Southern.

Sorry if I'm not making any sense.

Here is a drawing. I know it looks like a 6 year old drew it, but I think it helps explain my question.



Its confusing.



[edit on 18-6-2010 by earth2]




posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 09:42 PM
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i was asking about that in another thread...it really travels in one day...i don't understand that.. in one day it went three moon diameters to the south or five diameters



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 10:24 PM
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The moon goes around the earth once in approximately 27.3 days. That means it moves about 13 degrees in the sky every day, no? 13*3=36 degrees, which is approximately 1/4 of the way across the sky.



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 10:28 PM
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its Project Bluebeam. sometimes I'll see the moon in several places, like its moved back and forth, in one night. Or I'll see it at 11 PM and it'll still be out at 8 AM. I dont know much about the moons orbit though so I just chalk it up to that



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 10:33 PM
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or Something is coming our way and its changing our coruse path of the moon, the moon has never acted like this before.



[edit on 18-6-2010 by Agent_USA_Supporter]



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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The movement of the moon is quite predictable. A couple months ago I wrote a little PERL script that takes the phase, distance, and longitude of the moon, and convertes the data into something that could be visually displayed on 3 gauges. I call it my Earthquake predictor. Right now (as I type this), this is what it is displaying:



I also modified the code to create a table of data that I used in a spreadsheet to chart these forces in a wave pattern (i.e. line is at top when moon is full, down when not, up when moon is closer to Earth, down when farther away). This is what that chart looks like for 2010 (although every year should appear similar):



I call the above my Earth bio-rhythm chart. According to the above chart, I'm waiting to see what happens on or about Sept 9 (well I was, now I don't care because we're all doomed now). Also, those last two strong quakes, in Haiti and Chili, happened when all three forces were aligned. I don't know if that really means anything, but it is something to think about.

I thought it a fun little quick project to slap together so that in one quick glace at the gauges, I could visually see these forces relative to their range.

If anyone is interested, I could post the code here, it's pretty short, about 120 lines. You'll need PERL installed on your computer (along with the DateTime and DateTime::Util::Astro::Moon libs, all freely available on the net of course). You'll need a webserver to serve it up to you on too because I used googles jsapi for the gauges, but one could also modify the program to run simply with PERL itself and display the data in any form or fashion they please.

My idea in this is that, the higher the average, the stronger and more frequent the quakes might be. While none of this may have any scientific validity to it one way or another when it comes to earthquake predictions, seeing these numbers on a gauge does tell me the status of things, as opposed to a big number that, for example, says how far the moon is from the Earth (what does that number mean unless you remember the range that it falls within).

Anyhow, I wrote a whole bunch of little things like this, mostly for my own amusement. I display them on a single webpage I call my Earth Status Board, ha. I'd give you the link, but I don't have a public server for it, it's running on my own little home webserver, and it would certainly crash if I posted the link here.

[edit on 18-6-2010 by Divinorumus]

[edit on 18-6-2010 by Divinorumus]



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by Divinorumus
 

That's pretty cool but it does get a bit more complicated than what you're dealing with. Tidal forces also depend on the distance between the Sun and the Earth which varies with the time of year.

I just use tide charts. They handle it all quite accurately.

tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov...

There is some evidence that slight tremors in certain faults can be affected by tidal forces but evidence that large scale seismic activity is affected is lacking.



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Hey, thanks, I'm always looking for more information to add to my status board display.



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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reply to post by Divinorumus
 


Phage always posts with soruces from gov.com or org,



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 

Not always.
But at least I know my behind from a hole in the ground (and my ahead).
www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 6/19/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 19 2010 @ 03:36 AM
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Originally posted by earth2
Couple of days ago the Moon was right next to Venus.
Today the Moon is farther to the South not even close to Venus.
How can it travel that far South in just a few Days? I would think the Moon would be lower or higher, but not more to the left or Southern.

The moon follows a ground track something like this:

which varies with each pass something like this:

As you can see each orbit is going to make the moon raise in a slightly different location. This happens because the moon does not rotate around the earth on a flat path, but one that is inclined to the equator of the earth. Since the timing of the earths rotation and the orbit of the moon are not exact, your spot on earth will cross under the moon when its at various points in its inclination to your position. Venus on the other hand is orbiting the sun, and is further away so its position changes in the sky are much more gradual than the moons.

Maybe not the clearest explanation, but I hope that helps you understand it better.




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