It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Old article about GMO foods and the current policies

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 16 2010 @ 09:24 PM
link   
This article was written in the year 2000.

www.csa.com...

Conclusion

Genetically-modified foods have the potential to solve many of the world's hunger and malnutrition problems, and to help protect and preserve the environment by increasing yield and reducing reliance upon chemical pesticides and herbicides. Yet there are many challenges ahead for governments, especially in the areas of safety testing, regulation, international policy and food labeling. Many people feel that genetic engineering is the inevitable wave of the future and that we cannot afford to ignore a technology that has such enormous potential benefits. However, we must proceed with caution to avoid causing unintended harm to human health and the environment as a result of our enthusiasm for this powerful technology.

------------------------------

How can the government just let the industry not label GMO foods, and not properly regulate GM foods in the market? This is crazy. Nobody knows the exact effect GM foods can have on us. There isn't even an organization that is really directly involved in GMO regulation. FDA only regulates food products, but whole GM foods, who regulation those?

It seems nobody does.

more:

"The current FDA policy was developed in 1992 (Federal Register Docket No. 92N-0139) and states that agri-biotech companies may voluntarily ask the FDA for a consultation. Companies working to create new GM foods are not required to consult the FDA, nor are they required to follow the FDA's recommendations after the consultation. Consumer interest groups wish this process to be mandatory, so that all GM food products, whole foods or otherwise, must be approved by the FDA before being released for commercialization. The FDA counters that the agency currently does not have the time, money, or resources to carry out exhaustive health and safety studies of every proposed GM food product. Moreover, the FDA policy as it exists today does not allow for this type of intervention."

"Secondly, what are the acceptable limits of GM contamination in non-GM products? The EC has determined that 1% is an acceptable limit of cross-contamination, yet many consumer interest groups argue that only 0% is acceptable. Some companies such as Gerber baby foods42 and Frito-Lay43 have pledged to avoid use of GM foods in any of their products. But who is going to monitor these companies for compliance and what is the penalty if they fail? Once again, the FDA does not have the resources to carry out testing to ensure compliance. "

[edit on 16-6-2010 by The Quiet Storm]




posted on Jun, 16 2010 @ 09:26 PM
link   
What about the reported cases of sterility, hair growth on tongues, and deformities on the tested animals??

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm......



new topics
 
0

log in

join