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Why so many Airplane incidents in the USA

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posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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Why so many Airplane incidents in the USA


hisz.rsoe.hu

There appears to be a load of airplane incidents and accidents in the USA currently........ Reasons ??

Have a look at the attached link..
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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I was just looking at the EDIS website and noticed an unusual number of aircraft and airplane incidents in the mainland USA....... Any reasons for these ????

There appears to be over twenty incidents (20) which appears high to me or maybe it's just a bad day to be flying
Any strange activities.... weather patterns, sunspots, CME's, electromagnetic rays affecting these aircrarft ?? Or just coincidence ?.

hisz.rsoe.hu
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:07 AM
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You'r gonna get a mod spank your wrists for not following the breaking news forum rules buddy!

This should have been in another forum really.



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by Now_Then
 


Sorry.... got carried away with this because I am curious about this..



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:12 AM
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I think Michael Moor covers this in his new Capitalism documentary. I think it something to with over worked pilots. Sorry for the vague response, but could lead you to more informaton



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


No, I don't mean in general but if you look at the recorded accidents and incidents on the Emergency and disaster information service - above link then you will see over the 13/14 th June there have been loads of incidents ????



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by PurpleDog UK
reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


No, I don't mean in general but if you look at the recorded accidents and incidents on the Emergency and disaster information service - above link then you will see over the 13/14 th June there have been loads of incidents ????


Maybe it's nothing. I looked at the chart and they are all for different things. It doesn't seem to be a big deal...and I would rather not look at this since I have to fly in a few weeks and I am terrified



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:21 AM
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I am not going mad here but I have just revisited the EDIS site and they have reduced the number of incidents to 8 across the map image ???

I counted over 20 not more than 1/2 hour ago ??

I am confused about this as there were incidents from the 13 and 14th june all over and now they have gone ??

Am I losing my marbles here .......



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:32 AM
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There's no real increase in aircraft incidents. There is an increase in the media reporting aircraft incidents. Would you consider a .001% chance of there being an incident a good number? If you said yes, think about this. There is over 1 million flights per year. If only .001% of those flights had an incident, that is still over 1000 incidents per year or almost three per day.



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 10:53 AM
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Interesting, there are three currently showing on the world map in north america and they are all Fairchild A-10 thunderbolt 2 craft. I wonder what the hell the significance of that is ?

www.military-today.com...

Picture of aircraft specified. Perhaps this is a shakedown month for these craft since all three of the Aircraft incidents I found have the Fairchild as the machine involved in the incidents?

IM SORRY there are far more than three air related incidents/accidents on the map, and ALL are reading as involving thunderbolts... this is weird . Any one have any futher information on that odd coincidence?

[edit on 15-6-2010 by TrueBrit]



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by PurpleDog UK
 


There really aren't all that many. There are about 2,600 airliners and 74,500 general aviation aircraft registered in the US. According to NTSB estimates, they fly over 46 million hours per year.
One thing that can affect the stats is that the NTSB and FAA define an aircraft "incident" to be anything that damages property or results in any injury (even a broken fingernail) involving an aircraft. And if it's not major damage to the stucture, it's an incident. So if you land and forget to put the wheels down and noone is seriously hurt and all it does is destroy the propellers and scrape off the belly skin, it is an incident. Likewise, if a baggage handler gets drunk on the job and drives his tug into a wingtip of a taxiing aircraft, breaking a $25.00 static wick, it's an aircraft incident.
Last year the scheduled airlines had one fatal accident out of 26 total accidents, killing 49 passengers. That is out of 10,200,000 flights.
General Aviation, in 20,500,000 flight hours had 272 fatal accidents killing 465 passengers.
So it's about 1 a day for GA and 1 a year for the airlines. I don't know where that hungarian website gets its statistics but they appear spurious.



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 12:12 AM
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I was on the edis site yesterday, Tuesday 7 September 10, and noticed 30 airplane incidents in the USA. After clicking details on many of them, I noticed almost all said "Fairchild A-10 Thunderbolt 2 ()" and had little more info. This is the third or fourth Tuesday in a row that there have been more than 15 airplane incidents in the US and they seem to only appear on Tuesdays...

Any ideas?



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 12:16 AM
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For some reason they have been saying A-10 for a while now,but that does look like a lot on edis ,i check in there regularly and have never seen that many.could be a lot of bad weather around.



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 12:23 AM
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What you are seeing is a culmination of many factors.

One: We have the media reporting it more. Nothing wrong with that there as it keeps the public informed and it also helps keep airliners and FAA on their toes.

Two: We are coming quickly to the the 20 year mark of when Air Traffic Controllers were fired and the FAA did a mass hiring to fill those spots. Now, 20 years pass, a lot of those controllers are beginning to retire. So again, the FAA is in a huge hiring process to fill those roles. Which means a bunch of 'green' controllers that are half as professional as their predecessors.

Three: Airliners have recently had a new requirement, in which when their TCAS (early warning radar system that tells the pilot of impeding conflict) to NTSB and maybe the FAA. I will have to dig for that source, but I am fairly certain it is a new mandatory requirement rather than optional.

Four: Newer systems in terms of how air traffic is handled are coming online that allow separation between airplanes to be reduced, more efficient lanes of departure and arrival, which leads to more planes in a given space as before.

Nothing fishy, just a system that is going through a lot of changes. Hopefully for the better. It is the best handled air space in the world if you look at overall safety record and amount of people who fly.

ETA: Also, it really depends on the incident. Was the incident major? Minor? On the ground? General aviation? Commercial? Looking deeper into the data helps one figure out if things are getting worse, or just a bad periord with a bunch of small mistakes.

[edit on 8-9-2010 by ownbestenemy]



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 02:46 AM
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There's no more incidents today than 20 years ago.
We departs with some kind of snag on most flights.
Basicly we just MEL it and go. It's perfectly legal and safe, however some times minor failures develops once airborne and we have to return to departure airport or divert to another airport in order to get it fixed.

TCAS traffic alert or RA is a big deal, and don't happen very often.
But when they do it's a damn cose call.

Considering the hig flow of airliners in the skies at any time this doesn't happen very often, and flying is still by far the safest way to get from one place to another.



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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I just wonder why they show up on Tuesdays...



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Not just happening in U.S. A 747 freighter crashed in dubai the other day, 14 died in NZ when a sky diving plane crashed on take off, Two light aircraft collided somewhere else. A small passenger plane crashed in the himalayas.
Plane incidents always seem to come in waves or groups. Might be related to the timewave theory.



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 12:12 PM
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I'm so glad you started this - I was just uploading the pic and not sure where to start asking about it. Thanks



peace



edit on 8-9-2010 by silo13 because: Edit =




posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 02:44 PM
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There is also much more aviation in the US than most other countries. Most countries have little to no general aviation, corporate flying, small freight aircraft that fly around, air ambulance flying. I would not be surprised if there are daily more flight hours in the US than the rest of the world put together.



posted on Sep, 8 2010 @ 03:20 PM
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A TU-154 lost power at 10,000 metres, the pilot manged to glide it down in one piece, everyone on board o.k!
Happened in russia. Thats the latest in a series of aviation mishaps this last fortnight. Like i said, aviation mishaps come in waves or cycles.


edit on 8-9-2010 by bargoose because: Forgot to type the last sentence



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