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BP Crop Dusting U.S. Population Under the Cover of Night

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posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by HrdCorHillbilly
 


LOL, I eat stuff, that when it is an ingredient in some other capacity it turns it toxic. For instance, Citric Acid, Capsacin, Ionic Silver. I even take "radioactive" Germanium tablets instead of anti-viral medications.

Now, as for not knowing what is in stuff. The FDA has a list of 10's of 1000's of proprietary ingredients that are not required to be put on ingredient lists. We don't know what is in anything!

I don't work for BP. If you read the Corexit thread you will see that my opinion changed. My first post or two were damning the whole operation and condemning the Coast Guard for letting them put unprecedented amounts into the water. The more I researched and read, the more I became a fan of the dispersants.

BTW, they are using other disperssants as well, and I don't know much about them, but supposedly the use of Corexit is almost stopped and another one is now the primary.




posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by HrdCorHillbilly
 


reply to post by HrdCorHillbilly
 


Your emotions are getting the best of you on here HrdCor. Slow down and discuss the issue with a level head. The other poster is posting information one can find on the internet. In my best guess and observation, in an attempt to reign in hysteria and misconception and present the information at hand, they have given pertinent information. This is the usual flow of a discussion/debate in regards to an issue.

The two types primarily being used are 9500 and 9527 according to reports I have found.

These MSDS sheets can be found HERE and HERErespectively.

As with any chemical, there is nearly always a general health risk. It is in what quantities, the type of exposure; i.e., ingestion, inhalation, etc.; and concentration of the chemical.

Here is where the waters become muddled, mind the pun. Does the chemical mutate when it comes into contact with oil? What about salt-water? What about salt-water/oil mixture? How does it react?

While the above questions would have been wise to have been answered before the use of Corexit in mass; that would have been Monday morning quarterbacking…

As for the report that the OP presented, I personally find it suspect if not a bit of association overload. People 300 miles away smelling the chemicals? Do they know what the chemical smells like? Or is this a case of people that are quite possibly close enough to gain a case of smelling something that has always been present, but they are now associating it with something that most likely isn’t even present?

The filmmaker also claims they are doing this under the cover of night over populated areas, if so, we should start to see a steady stream of video coming of these flights. If you notice, the planes shown over the gulf dispersing this agent are at a relatively low altitude. There will be wavers with the FAA for such flights over a populated area, the planes would not be under the ‘cover of the night’, etc.

It will be interesting if something comes along that gives credence to this report, but for now, I will hold this as someone looking to make their name just a bit bigger to alternative news community.



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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After reading the msds sheets the first thing that i found odd was the flash point being 181.4 degrees F. Does that seem low to anyone else?



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by dudly
After reading the msds sheets the first thing that i found odd was the flash point being 181.4 degrees F. Does that seem low to anyone else?


Ya that is pretty low I didn't look at it very close. Is that liquid or vapor flash point?

It does contain petroleum bases solvents, so I would have expected the flash point to be somewhere between turpentine and common soap, LOL.

The sun in the Gulf of Mexico can heat certain surfaces to that temperature. There was a story locally last week about a girl with second degree burns from a plastic slide being 160 degrees. I suppose there is the possibility of this stuff flashing if it hits the right hot object?



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


so its a dispersant that is used to dilute oil, or make it so the oil burns quicker? or maybe both? Interesting if it does burn easier with oil, in the ocean, why havent we heard that?



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Someone much more versed in chemicals would be better off answering, but the chemical does not sustain combustion.


This product would not be expected to burn unless all the water is boiled away. The remaining organics may be ignitable. Use extinguishing media appropriate for surrounding fire.


The question of it is a 'highly toxic' or even 'deadly neurotoxin' as the OPs link suggests, is to be remained questionable. It is not a natural substance that we or even other animals are exposed to normally so there will be side-effects to some degree. What they are, who knows.



posted on Jun, 15 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by dudly
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


so its a dispersant that is used to dilute oil, or make it so the oil burns quicker? or maybe both? Interesting if it does burn easier with oil, in the ocean, why havent we heard that?


It doesn't "dilute" the oil, it disperses it. The difference is that by dispersing it, the oil is broken down into smaller and smaller particulates, bonded to the agent, and sunk to the bottom. Dilution is what the seawater is already doing, and dilution is bad, because it just spreads it farther and wider.

As for the flashpoint and burning. If it flashes at a low temperature, and if it is floating on top of the water, and if its vapors are flammable, then it should burn great!

Currently they are having a hard time with their controlled burns, because the lighter portions of this crude that are making it to the top of the water are not burning very good. The rough waters are aggravating it, but the crude isn't as flammable as they would like.



posted on Jun, 16 2010 @ 02:20 AM
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Great stuff everyone.. I'm sure we could discuss the pros and cons of this chemical all year long.. but...

It doesn't answer the question if TPTB are spraying along the coastline or on nearby property, homes, pets, people, pools in secret night flights...

Has anyone kept an eye out for any silenced helicopters?

It could be true, I don't know..I'm not there to find out.. Would be interesting if it is going on.



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