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Smart underpants share how you're feeling

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posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 10:18 AM
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June 12, 2010

Most people go to great lengths to keep others from knowing what's going on inside their pants. But skivvies that relay data about the wearer could benefit some people--say soldiers. Yes, we're talking about tighty whities that talk.

Joseph Wang, a nanoengineering professor at the University of California at San Diego, has come up with underpants that have sensors built into the waistband to sense blood pressure, heart rate, and other biological markers. (As if I haven't written enough about high-tech underwear lately.)

The idea is to let remote doctors keep an eye on a soldier's vitals during field surgery, the meatball "put the guts back in" stuff that takes place on a battlefield before an injured warrior can be taken to a field hospital for better care. If you've seen an episode of "M*A*S*H," you know what I'm talking about. Hopefully they'll create a female version of the underwear for Klinger.


news.cnet.com...




Photographer says it not his style. What will they come with next, not a bad idea if someone needs to be monitored all the time for medical reasons. Isn't technology great?




posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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Puts new meaning into your mother telling you to always wear clean undies.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 10:33 AM
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I am curious how much they will cost, if insurance will cover it and if you need a prescription, of course they will be outrageously expensive, what isn't these days when it comes to anything medical.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Puts new meaning into your mother telling you to always wear clean undies.



Heh. I'm guessing if you are having to have meatball surgery performed on you, you already don't have clean underwear.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 12:56 PM
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Thinking about this it doesn't make sense to have this device in the waistband of underwear, seems it would disable it after putting it into a washing machine, why not a belt of some kind that isn't attached to anything. I hope our tax dollars didn't go into the development of this thing.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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I hope this keeps the doctors one more step forward in the right direction while caring for our brave soilders.

They deserve to given the best of whatever we have to help them IMO.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by sweetliberty
 


I agree, that they do deserve the best and unfortunately that is not always the case sweetliberty.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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You know, I honestly don't understand why they all aren't given bulletproof vests.
Why they aren't given more things that might play a big part in keeping them safer.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 


I have to agree, I think a belt would be more logical.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 02:31 PM
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sometimes my underwear already lets people know how im feeling.
second line/.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by sweetliberty
 


We ARE all given "bullet-proof" vests. They are a large, and fairly heavy item. It consists of a vest with overlapping Kevlar panels inside. On top of that, there are ceramic plates that slip into the vest to cover vital areas. All together, my vest weighed something approaching 25 lbs or so. That's in addition to all the other stuff you carry. I weighed my self once with all my gear, and I was nearly 320 lbs. That was me at 210, plus Body Armor, Ammo, M-249, medical bag, and rucksack.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by ZodiacFlyer
 


Thanks for the update, I thought that you all had chest vests, but remember when you didn't.



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 04:57 AM
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They've been available for years, and the OTV, or outer tactical vest was developed in the '90's and the new version, the IOTV (Improved OTV) was brought out in 2007 or so. (i only know this because it was between deployments for me. I wore the OTV in Kosovo, and the IOTV getting ready for Iraq) Part of the reason there was a fair amount of press regarding the lack of armor early in our current engagements is that units or individuals elected, for one reason or another not to take the armor with them. Or if they had it in-country, to not utilize it. It has become Army policy to wear it anytime you leave the perimeter of a secured area, or when there is a known threat. This could mean outside a bunker or hardened structure on a camp that sees a fair volume of incoming indirect fire (mortars, rockets, etc.) Carrying it even further, when units go through training for a deployment, the Soldiers are required to wear their issued armor while conducting any training that is not classroom, or physical fitness training. It makes for some long days.This is mostly to get used to moving around in the armor, as well as conditioning. It is likely, unless you run convoys or patrol EVERY day, to wear the vest more stateside than overseas.

This policy is an Army response to public outcry at the "lack of armor" from early in the Iraq war. While it is true that there was a lack of armored vehicles, particularly HMMWV's, almost everybody had body armor available. Some chose not to wear it. That choice has now been made for us. You WILL wear it is the choice. There is a trade off, however. There is an upward trend in back injuries, starting about the time that body armor wear became mandatory. LOD, or Line-Of-Duty investigations have linked most of these to the additional weight and bulk of the required armor and the attachments to the vest. These are not light. My vest weighed about 35lbs with the plates in. In addition, I carried either six magazines of M-16 ammo, or a couple boxes of M-249 ammo, depending on what I was doing that day. Plus about 10-12 pounds of water between two canteens and a Camelback. A few pounds in first aid gear, and a radio, and IR Beacon round out the stuff attached to just the vest. Depending on if I was carrying an M-4/M-16 or an M-249, I would have between 65- and 80 or so pounds hanging off of me. (I still haven't gone into what's in the rucksack... or how heavy it is... )

Oh....ummm.... I feel that I have taken this thread far afield it's original subject.... well.... I have been called "smarty-pants" a few times in my life. I never seriously thought that I could some day wear them.. There, I feel better now.



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by ZodiacFlyer
 


Thank you so much for this important information ZoliacFlyer, it is always better to hear it from the horses mouth so speak, there is so much conflicting information out there it is hard to know what to believe anymore, nothing like personal experience.



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 07:49 PM
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Wow! People still wear underwear?



Oh crap what year did I materialize in this time?????



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
Wow! People still wear underwear?



Nah, as a matter of fact they had to dig deep into the bowels of the Smithsonian to find those in the picture I posted.



posted on Jun, 16 2010 @ 03:05 AM
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You would be surprised (or not...) to find out just how fast folks "go commando" once they get into the desert. It gives sand less opportunity to be ground into sensitive areas.



posted on Jul, 2 2010 @ 11:53 PM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
Wow! People still wear underwear?


Didn't you get the memo?



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 12:07 AM
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And i though Smart underpants was a testing bed for taxing you for greenhouse gas emissions

The common fart is mostly CO2 and methane.



[edit on 3-7-2010 by ANNED]



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