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134-year-old oyster company stops shucking

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posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 07:29 PM
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134-year-old oyster company stops shucking


money.cnn.com

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- P&J Oyster Company, a 134-year old operation in the heart of New Orleans' French Quarter, has stopped shucking.

The company processes and distributes oysters. A big part of its business was shucking oysters out of their shells, but that has been killed off by the BP oil spill. Fewer oysters are being farmed in the oil-stained waters of the Gulf of Mexico. So P&J Oyster has no oysters to shuck.


(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
BP's extremely long list of violations (in only a few short years)




posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 07:29 PM
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This is so sad but unfortunately, only the beginning of what's to come. In New Orleans, oysters are very popular and whole restaurants are propped up by the slimy aphrodisiac. The companies that made their name from the oyster will now most likely have to fold, not only the fishermen and farmers that harvest the oyster beds but also the supply-chain down to the restaurants that serve them. Restaurants that only serve oysters as an obscure menu-item, such as Hooters, will most likely not even blink at the loss, but other companies that focused on the mollusks are all but already gone. It will be far too expensive to import and there is nothing better than a Louisiana marshland oyster on the half-shell.

I know oysters are only a tiny part of the devastation that is happening in the region but it is indicative of things to come. Say good-bye to everything we love about the South-Coast of America.

--airspoon


money.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon Say good-bye to everything we love about the South-Coast of America.


Well not exactly. We do still have two other oceans to get these beautifully smooth, yummy morsels from. That is, of course, if the plume doesn't destroy the east coast too. The gulf coast, however, will suffer greatly because the oysters (one example) will be so much more expensive for them to serve and they will not be as fresh.

However, I do agree with the sentiment of your thread, it is indeed sad and is indicative of what we will see more and more of in the very near future. :cry:



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 


I am a big fan of raw oysters and I can say from experience that Louisiana oysters are the best, by far. Maybe the warm and plentiful brackish waters add to their taste?

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon


"slimy aphrodisia"

money.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



Yes, I love those dang things. I'll miss them....



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:27 PM
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every ones talking about the oysters . wile they may be good there will be thousands if not hunders of thousands of people put out of work because of this.
whole towns will be shutting down in the near futcher .
towns already hit hard but the umm ression will be like ghost towns after this is all said and done.
and in the end it will be 20? 30 ? 50? 100? years untill the area recovers IF it ever does as along with the oil we are still allaying millions of tons of nitrgion from the farming belt to pollute the waters even more.
i do so fear we are truly looking at the total collapse of the gulf.
Which would have happened anyway soon enough with the dead zones growing year by year



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by xxcalbier
 


My intent was not to belittle the situation, only point to one issue that is indicative of what's to come. I grew up in New Orleans with my entire family still living there and I consider it home, still. My heart and soul is still New Orleans. I know the tough times they/we are facing but sometimes you have to call attention to the little things that we take for granted in order to portray the bigger picture.

--airspoon



[edit on 12-6-2010 by airspoon]



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:34 PM
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I know the oil spill is a very tragic event that has adversely impacted thousands of lives, but now for a little levity.

A shipment of oysters came in to this company once. All the oysters in the shipment were females with eggs in them. Some of the more dimwitted workers at the plant processed the oysters. This made these guys......

Mother Shucking Fools!

One of the guys that worked in the plant was really interested in becoming a Roman Catholic priest, but he could not go through with it because.....

he did not want to give up shucking.

One of the guys had a technique of opening the oysters by placing his knife through the oysters' rear. He was...

shucking the oysters in the in the butt!



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon
reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 


I am a big fan of raw oysters and I can say from experience that Louisiana oysters are the best, by far. Maybe the warm and plentiful brackish waters add to their taste?

--airspoon


Ok, I'll give you that. I just hope that the crawfish (or crawdads as we call em in SC) aren't decimated as well. They're actually my favorite. Although freshwater, I think it's very likely that the freshwater swamps and marshes will suffer too. But, maybe not...



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


add this on top of the mass increase of sushi markets i see popping up on every street in phoenix, and soon all sea food will become an expensive rarity



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:59 PM
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It aint oyster season right now anyway, I figured they would be imported or farm raised right now.



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 



I just hope that the crawfish (or crawdads as we call em in SC) aren't decimated as well. They're actually my favorite. Although freshwater, I think it's very likely that the freshwater swamps and marshes will suffer too. But, maybe not...


I agree, I love crayfish (pronounced 'crawfish'). The crayfish in Louisiana are so good because of the heavy calcium and oxygen that seeps up through the ground into the water. They will most likely be affected because the toxicity of the oil and chemical dispersants. If a hurricane comes through, then they will surely be decimated as the chemical laden water will be spread inland.

Louisiana supplies 98% of the crayfish harvested in North America with 90% harvested world-wide. Of those, 70-80% are consumed locally. Simply put: No more crayfish.

--airspoon


[edit on 12-6-2010 by airspoon]



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 11:00 PM
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Thats truly a shame.. I remember years ago the great hospitality and seafood on the gulfcoast.. The shrimp industry there is probably dead now to due to the oilspill..



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 11:11 PM
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It's too bad for the company. But it's good for the oysters! Face it, the creatures are NOT Kosher. Think of them as `filters of the sea`, complete with sea spit or ocean saliva. That's what people are eating essentially - living filters.

Oh, and don't get me started on eating raw crayfish! Those things have eggs and its accompanying parasites, which lives inside the human body. (It was one of those Discovery Health shows about microscopic monsters).


MBF

posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by pikypiky
 


Maybe, but they are GOOD!


Line 2.



posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by pikypiky
 


How is it good for the oysters? They are going to die either way. They are either going to die from the chemicals or they are going to die from being eaten. Personally, I would rather them die to be eaten.

--airspoon



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