Creatures that bigger than blue whale

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posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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It makes you wonder what the Bloop truly was. If that was a creature, then its probably the size of a small town or city.




posted on Jun, 13 2010 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by -Blackout-
 


Estimates of the size of the creature producing the bloop are not quite that big, but bigger than a blue whale. Real evidence is so much more fun and so much more interesting than the fake stories strewn everywhere. I hope the big bloop talks again some day.



posted on Jun, 17 2010 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by Thain Esh Kelch
I don't think such a large creature is capable of living so deep below. The oxygen concentration is so low, that it would have to come up to the surface once in a while. And, well, no krakens on CNN yet.

You can't trust CNN, Wikipedia and something similar, but Allah with his infinite wisdom can creates creatures larger than Blue Whale living so deep below or on Gas Giants



posted on Jun, 17 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by masonicon
 


So you don't have any evidence for anything larger than a blue whale. All you have is conjecture based on possibilities from your personal interpretation of what happen based on belief in a supernatural agent.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by warpcrafter
Don't forget about Cthulhu!!! If he awakens, the old gods will soon come back, and then we're all screwed.


speak for yourself. i love Cthulhu.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 03:50 PM
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Here is Documented Evidence of a a giant shark larger than a plane. Said shark showed extraordinary trajectory calculation capabilities. God bless the poor souls who perished in the filming of this incredible beast.

www.youtube.com...

[edit on 6/22/2010 by Lifeadventurer]



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 05:40 PM
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Hmmm, interesting topic...

If you share the opinion of some marine biologists then the largest living organism in the ocean would be the Great Barrier Reef.

Otherwise, one of the depictions of the Sharktopus? Not the small one, I mean the giant one that attacks battleships.



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by Thain Esh Kelch
What phenomena?

Well, you got the Rok, Kraken, dinosaurs, giants, my mother-in-law, and space blobs.


LOL

and the funniest post this week goes to....



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by masonicon
Is there's legendary creatures that at least bigger than Blue Whales in the unexplored depths of ocean or Outer space?



Well, I haven't heard of any creatures in the unexplored depths of ocean. I have yet to see any legendary creature at all in Outer space.

So I guess the most appropriate answer to your question is simply... Not yet.

[edit on 22-6-2010 by MKULTRA]



posted on Jun, 22 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by faceoff85
 




Bloop? care to devulge on that? havent heard of it before...


Not only "bloop", but a variety of weird sounds, most of which were picked up by independent subsurface hydrophone arrays thousand(s) of miles apart. Making them very powerful in amplitude. Also very low frequency. Note that the recordings on the NOAA page are 16x the actual duration.

NOAA Unidentified subsea sounds page

Weird? IMO very much so.



[edit on 22-6-2010 by 1SawSomeThings]



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Thain Esh Kelch
What phenomena?

Well, you got the Rok, Kraken, dinosaurs, giants, my mother-in-law, and space blobs.


The mother-in-law thing is great. But yeah you named like every known one I can think of.

I believe there are unknown creatures like that in the depths of the ocean somewhere.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Thain Esh Kelch
What phenomena?

Well, you got the Rok, Kraken, dinosaurs, giants, my mother-in-law, and space blobs.


The mother-in-law thing is great. But yeah you named like every known one I can think of.

I believe there are unknown creatures like that in the depths of the ocean somewhere.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 01:08 PM
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did anybody mention Godzilla yet?



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 07:24 AM
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Stereologist is sort of right. Sort of.



an·i·mal (n-ml)
n.
1. A multicellular organism of the kingdom Animalia, differing from plants in certain typical characteristics such as capacity for locomotion, nonphotosynthetic metabolism, pronounced response to stimuli, restricted growth, and fixed bodily structure.

www.thefreedictionary.com...

Locomotion doesn't need to mean it moves around, it can mean that certain stages of development are motile or that individual cells are.

I'm aware that there is a single tunicate that stretches miles along the bottom of the Gorges bank.

So, it depends what you define an "animal" as. But in my opinion, blue whales have nothin' on this. People just tend to only count vertebrates.

krbd.org...

digitalcommons.uconn.edu...



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


The tunicate population you refer to is a colony of animals. I am not restricting myself to motile animals.


“There is a tunicate, Didendum, that is on Georges Bank, very famous fishing grounds on the North East, they were the cod fishing grounds, it’s covering huge areas there, like up to six miles in diameter, areas on the bottom.

Here they are referring to a species, not a single organism. They form a colony of many individual creatures that can blanket large areas.

Tunicates - wikipedia

Tunicates

Some are as small as sesame seeds and some as big as potatoes. Some are solitary and others live in dense clusters.

Read more: Tunicate - Biology Encyclopedia - body, animal, water www.biologyreference.com...

The biggest tunicates are only hand sized specimens.



Tunicates, like humans, are in the animal phylum Chordata. Read more: Tunicate - Biology Encyclopedia - body, animal, water www.biologyreference.com...


Didendum photo



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 07:49 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Most tunicates are colonial. Sorry, I forgot to clarify. I personally count most colonial organisms as a single entity. Example: P. physalis (Portoguese Man O' War) is a colonial cnidarian but it is commonly considered a single entity. I have held B. violaceus in my hand and it is functionally a single organism.

I thought it was a given because the B. violaceus pictured in the article that I linked, and all of the species discussed in the two links, are commonly known colonial tunicates.

Oh and they're not referring to the species in general. They're referring to a micropopulation of a colonial tunicate that began as a single cluster. Therefore the organisms are nearly genetically identical, whereas a species has high genetic diversity.

Which I'm sure you already know.

[edit on 6/25/2010 by ravenshadow13]



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


There are species which have low genetic diversity as you know.

How do you know that this colonial began from 1 individual? You don't know that do you? You are guessing.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


I know how colonial orgasm typically develop. I didn't say one, I said a small cluster. It doesn't start off huge and recruitment doesn't work like that.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


In this case the animals are reproducing sexually. Their genetic diversity is large. They happen to live in close proximity. It is many individuals in close proximity.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


No, their genetic diversity is not very large because I don't think the pelagic stage lasts long enough for very large dispersal patterns. I am aware that they reproduce sexually.

Come back to me regarding the dispersal of tunicate larvae and maybe I will believe you.

Edit: I'm not trying to be picky, I'm trying to get you to ask questions and consider all of the options.

[edit on 6/25/2010 by ravenshadow13]





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