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Oil Volcano Pressure Too Great

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posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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I just came across this article which may possibly be disinfo, but I doubt it. The scenarios that are hypothesized make sense at a nearly unbelievable new level. If what they say about this is true then we are all in for a really really bad year. I had theorized about this same possibility and it could be an inevitable event if something is not done, and soon. This could possibly drop us back a century or 2. If even half of this is true then the oil that would engulf the shores of Florida would shut down their main water desalinization plant (and clog the many aquifers around the state), and force the coastal power plants (including nuke plants) to shut down for lack of proper cooling water.

www.rense.com...

While it is quite possible that the Obama administration is making an asserted effort to squelch much of the info coming out of the gulf, this guy seems legit, and wanted to get the info out before it was buried.




posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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No, that is quite silly. The idea that the water is going be forced into some sort of furnace in the cavern where the oil was is patently ridiculous.

If the Oil and Natural Gas was sitting in a cavern heated to 400*, it would have combusted quite some time ago.

Seriously, if you believe this I have some shoreline in Louisiana to sell you, great investment opportunity, pure as the driven snow.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by OuttaTime
 



I too think this will be impossible to fix. Whether it was done on purpose or purposefully having no safety mechanism enforced, will be debated just like the events of 9-11 forever!!!!
We'll never know unless someone 'fesses up.

But you know what?
I live in SE Florida.

And for years........it's been prophesied how Florida will disappear (likely scenario, a tidal wave) so, I am wondering....could this be some kinda of omen or intervention? I mean, maybe it'll be this calamity to be the catalysist to force many of us to leave the area 'before' the great tsunami hits (if of course, it does)

Obviously this is just my speculation but ever since this happened, it REALLY got me considering a move back home to upstate NY!

I never wanted to buy into the 2012-dooms day mindset (pole shifts etc) but now............I am really wondering if this may be a blessin' in disguise!



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


Hmmm, I don't know about that. They were also under pressure with no relief valving and no viable oxygen. It has a tinderbox potential now that there are polls both above and below the well. Has anyone ever detonated a nuke in a giant reservoir of oil and methane yet? I for one don't really care to find out
Especially since it's only a few miles deep. Other underground nuke test have left huge craters in the earth from the void it created which could possibly make the barrier between ocean floor and reserve even thinner at that point.
There will come a point when the pressure in the reservoir will drop below the pressures generated at 1 mile deep in the sea, where the sea water will begin to seep in. I don't know what the temperatures are at that depth are, as they will vary depending on their location to magma pools along fault lines and areas that have had volcanic activity. A couple hundred million years ago, there was a volcanic event in that area (Mississippi I think) that was an extinction event comparable to the potential of Yellowstone now), so there may still be magmatic activity further beneath the oil pockets, so who knows?
And you can keep your LA beachfront property
. I like the northeast better.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by One Moment
 


I agree with ya bro. I have about 5 family members near Tampa so I'm watchin this hard. If the oil gets onto the continental shelf in bulk, the black tide will pretty much shut down Fla.
I also agree that this will be heavily debated just like 9/11. But I'd rather put all the cards on the table so I can ponder the big picture. I know quite a few people in Fla and I'd like to be able to give them viable info and guidance since most of them are still pretty much asleep.
I never believed the clockwork agenda of 2012. Things like that don't happen overnight. They build momentum before they break the dam open


Changed the 2112 to 2012 (typo)

[edit on 9-6-2010 by OuttaTime]



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 06:35 PM
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Hello everyone. Long time "lurcher", first time posting. I'll keep my introduction short for now because I just ran across a page that sounds eerily similar to the situation in the Gulf and wanted to throw it out there for review and comment by other ATS members.

This is from a scientific analysis performed by UC Berkeley two years ago (ironically, the date on the article reads 6/9/2008, exactly two years to this date)

"Javan mud volcano triggered by drilling, not quake"

Here's a particular statement from that article that was quite alarming to me:



"There is not a hope on Earth they are going to stop it now," Manga added. "You can plug up a hole, but if you try to plug a crack, stuff just flows around the plug, or the crack gets bigger. The well now has no effect on the erupting mud, it was just the trigger that initiated it."


My concern is if they can't "plug a crack" on solid ground, how can we expect anyone to fix a similar problem a mile down in the ocean? I certainly don't want to be a fear-monger by any means, but as I'm watching the live feed, I sure see a lot of what appears to me to be fire. Wouldn't it require a significant amount of oxygen to keep escaping gas(es) burning when exiting from what remains of the pipe?


[edit on 9-6-2010 by here2Help]



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 06:52 PM
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I read that the pressure was around 11,000psi. I can't say for sure they've released the accurate number but they would have the equipment to know what the pressure was.

11,000psi is a tremendous amount of pressure though. For example the Seawolf class submarine has a crush depth of around 2400ft thats only around 900psi.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by here2Help
 


Interesting. Yep it would be pretty hard to stop a leak at that pressure. Kinda like trying to plug up a garden hose by stuffing sand in the other end. At that pressure the most probable way to stop it is by pumping in mud and debris at the base of the well, but the pressure is so high that it just blows everything back out. If there was a relief in pressure then mud would have time to clog, but nothing seems to work besides the consideration of extremes. Either way we are staring down a barrel. Just like you I don't intent to fearmonger, but I do want as many facts as I can get before I decide how bad it is.

From what I've read in other threads here on ATS, benzene is also in the spew mixture, and according to the underwater welders, benzene is an oxidant.

[edit on 9-6-2010 by OuttaTime]



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


And if they tried to pump fodder into the well shaft it would have had to been done at at least 12,000 psi to avoid collapse of the feed line pumping the goo down there. I had thought about the possibility of putting a hydraulic inflatable bladder into the pipe and filling it with hydraulic fluid under pressure and sealing the leak. But at those high pressures it would not be long before it was shot out like a bullet.
And just imagine the friction and wear on the inside of the pipe as all that stuff is spilling out. Just as the article said, the pipe is 2" thick, and could be as thin as 1" by now. If the pipe gets worn out then the erosion of that well line at that pressure would cause the hole to expand exponentially until the pressure let off. It could grow from a couple feet in diameter now, to 10 or 20 feet just hours after the blowout. The barrels per day would be astronomical after that point.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 08:47 PM
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Wonder if they could make some sort of incinerator top hat and just burn it down there as it comes out. I know they would hate to do it since they could not make any money off their leak but we really need to stop the flow and soon.

BP should forget any thought at this point of making any profits till they have this under control.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by OuttaTime
 


Is there a source for information about the "sandblasting" affect?

I've seen it mentioned various times but noone ever has any "solid" sources for the information other than speculation.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by Xeven
Wonder if they could make some sort of incinerator top hat and just burn it down there as it comes out. I know they would hate to do it since they could not make any money off their leak but we really need to stop the flow and soon.

BP should forget any thought at this point of making any profits till they have this under control.


As an option, that would probably be our best eco-friendly choice. It would still produce the carbons and cooked byproducts, but it would certainly cut down on the black tide syndrome.
If BP even THINKS there is still profit to be made on this, then they will continue doing what they're doing. Remember Rahm Emanuel (Obamas top advisor) had previously stated 'never let a good disaster go to waste'. And that is primarily their modus operandi. The cleanup effort underway (if you dare call it that) is just another profiteering venture. Haliburton bought Boots n' Coots oil cleanup business just weeks before the accident.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


Same here, and if there is anyone who cold shed a few links on this it would be appreciated.
From my observations, any particles (sand, rocks, mud, cement) going through that well pipe at that velocity and pressure will begin wearing down the inside of the pipe from friction and scarring (just like the wear on piston rings in an engine). If the pipe is iron, then it is pretty hard, but I'm not sure how chemically resistant it is at that flow rate, despite the fact that benzene is a corrosive chemical.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


how much O2 at that 400 ft below the surface? you do REALIZE fire usually almost never burns without oxygen?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:27 PM
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You know, something just hit me. Since UC Berkeley just did a thorough analysis of a situation rather similar to this two years ago, I wonder if BP has approached the university to ask for assistance? Or NASA, MIT, etc?

I looked up this quote from the movie "Armageddon" to make sure I quoted this right. Just replace the word "NASA" with "BP":

www.moviequotes.com...

Even though the situation is reversed - big oil needing NASA, rather than NASA needing experienced drillers [in a far-fetched, fictitious movie plot of course] - doesn't it make logical sense to ask some of the smartest people in the world their ideas for fixing this mess?

(disclaimer: for all I know, they already have, but from what I've read to date, I haven't seen any evidence of such. Someone can feel free to correct me if I'm wrong)



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by D.E.M.
 


the methane wont burn unless mixed with oxygen.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by letscit
 


sorry it seems others have already have addressed this. i have seen in a video where it seems bp is burning off the gas with a tube inserted into the oil and gas as it is shooting out.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:55 PM
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Perhaps there is a glimmer of hope though. After reading back over that article about the Javan mud volcano study that UC Berkeley performed, I noticed that the article states that mud volcanoes "frequently erupt underwater, such as in the Gulf of Mexico, where sediments are laid down rapidly."

Assuming this statement is accurate (which, of course, it may not be), do naturally-occurring volcanoes that erupt in the Gulf of Mexico settle down after some period and stop spewing out stuff on their own?

Is it even possible to drill into both an underground volcano *and* an oil reserve under the ocean at the same time? Spewing from the same wellhead?

What if this was just natural gas mixed with some source of oxygen [from where I have no idea]. Granted, still bad, but not as bad as a "mud volcano" it sounds. If that were the case, anyone know where this ample supply of oxygen might be coming from?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by letscit
reply to post by D.E.M.
 


the methane wont burn unless mixed with oxygen.


How much methane would have to escape for a mass extinction?

www.newscientist.com...

www.dailypaul.com...

http://(nolink)/2010/05/24/breaking-news-reports-huge-explosions-seafloor-collapse-beneath-gulf-oil-spill/

I'm' getting more then a little worried.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 10:00 PM
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sorry it seems others have already have addressed this. i have seen in a video where it seems bp is burning off the gas with a tube inserted into the oil and gas as it is shooting out.


Very interesting. Thank you very much for pointing that out! I hadn't seen anything about that yet. I sure hope that's the case.



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