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How addictive is alcohol really? Allen Carr vs. AA.

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posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by ulsterman
 


You can't quit for long if you have no idea why you drink. When I drank just to get drunk, it was an avoidance mechanism. I had to understand what it was about me that I needed to avoid. I had some deep issues that I had to overcome. It wasn't easy(actually at times it was damned hard), but I think I'm a better person for it.




posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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I am tired of all you guys saying its addictive and bad well listen to this. My father used to be a major alcoholic I am 24 and I drink occasionally. The last time I had a drink was 4 months ago. I don't feel as I need it. I can drink with care. I do not wake up feeling the need to drink or anything like that.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by TheChemist187
I am tired of all you guys saying its addictive and bad well listen to this. My father used to be a major alcoholic I am 24 and I drink occasionally. The last time I had a drink was 4 months ago. I don't feel as I need it. I can drink with care. I do not wake up feeling the need to drink or anything like that.


I'm having a very had time grasping your point. So, you don't think alcohol is addictive because you're not addicted to it?
That's pretty illogical and egocentric.

Some people have problems with alcohol, while others don't. It's not black and white as you put it.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 

I'm definately going to try some more of the niacin (vitamin B3) although it's already in my daily vitamin.
But there's other issues. For example, creative people like students and academics suffer from "stage-fright" or other blocks with their writing.
Many feel they have a social problem with booze, but also use it as a personal crutch.
In the US something like 20% of students admitted using alcohol or pills as aids to their work. If college academia was tested for "banned substances" like sports men or women, they might as well shut down Oxford.
Sure, especially beer was very nutritious and supllies B viamins with the alcohol. However, somehow I'm skeptical that B vitamins will cure alcoholism.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 

Did you know if you dose up hugely on B12 you can drink heavily for hours and hardly get drunk at all? You use that one for playing poker with your friends and you will very likely take all their money...don't take my word for it, try it and see...

(This also relates to why vegans get drunk quickly...)

[edit on 9-6-2010 by nine-eyed-eel]



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
reply to post by unityemissions
 

I'm definately going to try some more of the niacin (vitamin B3) although it's already in my daily vitamin.
But there's other issues. For example, creative people like students and academics suffer from "stage-fright" or other blocks with their writing.
Many feel they have a social problem with booze, but also use it as a personal crutch.
In the US something like 20% of students admitted using alcohol or pills as aids to their work. If college academia was tested for "banned substances" like sports men or women, they might as well shut down Oxford.
Sure, especially beer was very nutritious and supllies B viamins with the alcohol. However, somehow I'm skeptical that B vitamins will cure alcoholism.



It certainly won't work for everyone, but it seems to cure the majority. Be sure to slowly ramp up the doses of niacin. It causes a histamine release, which will make your body feel like it's sunburning all over! Don't take niacinamide, and in fact I'd suggest taking the inositol-hexanicotinate version. It will lessen the flushing effect.

The creativity seen in most people stems from biochemical imbalances as well! It seems to be largely caused by a copper:zinc imbalance in ones tissues and blood. One reason for this is that copper is used for water treatment in swimming pools, and also the copper tubing which carries most public water.

Check this link out:

Copper Toxicity

You may also find this interesting:

Pyroluria


I was a hardcore stoner and somewhat of an alcoholic. I was under such severe stress that I was rolling another while puffing on one! I consumed at least a few beers each day.

It turns out that I was biochemically diseased. My copper hair levels were greater than 3 standard deviations above norm! , and I tested as severely pyroluric. It took a lot of changes and patience to balance me out, but now I can go weeks without either. If I drink, I can stop after one or two. That wasn't really possible before!



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:21 PM
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Alcohol can certainly be a problem for some. I find AA and the 12-step programs to be cults which present false information about addictions. Although they may be successful in preventing further abuse in some people, I refuse to believe that alcoholism is a "disease" and one from which you are "eternally recovering". Even worse is the religious conversion mechanisms within the program.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 


Yes, it's pathetic. They want you to remain a needy victim. It's definitely a cult. People who accept this philosophy are doomed to remain dependent one way or another.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 


Yeah, saying that you are powerless before alcohol does seem like bad luck, on the face of it...It's like a negative magical affirmation for sure...But all they are really doing is exteriorizing their strength at one remove, putting it on to their "Higher Power", obviously...If it works in practice for somebody, all good, matter of personal taste etc...



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by nine-eyed-eel
But all they are really doing is exteriorizing their strength at one remove, putting it on to their "Higher Power", obviously...If it works in practice for somebody, all good, matter of personal taste etc...


I won't say it's "all good" but quitting the abuse is certainly good. Denying yourself your incredible achievement and attributing it to "higher powers" is ridiculous and misleading. Believing you're diseased and constantly recovering is likewise ridiculous and misleading. Then spending the rest of your life "sponsoring" other members insures a lifetime devotion to the Church Of The Addiction You Wanted To Stop.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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I don't think alcohol is addictive as a substance, but I do feel that some people are prone to become addicted both mentally and physically to it.

I think the physical dependency that comes from it is a direct result of becoming addicted mentally to the mood altering feeling that some get from it. Withdraw is a very serious thing from alcohol, and should be done under medical care from a trained doctor.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 

I am very much in sympathy with your points.

By saying "all good" I was, of course, stupidly lapsing into my typical misleading commonplace ghetto figure-of-speech pit, and you did well to correct me, thanks.

Half the time talking like a dog is helpful, but not always.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by broahes
 

If the alcoholic, who is mentally or physically prone to its addiction, is the problem, then even dry cultures have alcoholics?
I mean isn't it true that a society that lacks alcohol lacks alcoholics?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by nine-eyed-eel
reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 

I am very much in sympathy with your points.

By saying "all good" I was, of course, stupidly lapsing into my typical misleading commonplace ghetto figure-of-speech pit, and you did well to correct me, thanks.

Half the time talking like a dog is helpful, but not always.



No need to explain. I wasn't taking it literally and didn't mean to correct you.


I just used it as an opportunity to throw out some more of my disdain for the 12 step programs.


Thanks for your input, I think we see eye to eye on this one.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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AA takes the blame from the person and places it on an object, in this case alcohol. Jerks who stop drinking are often still jerks. It's not the booze, it's the person. It wasn't until after I started to take responsibility for my actions and stopped blaming my parents, past and alcohol for my problems that I actually grew. AA didn't do anything for me. Having a sponser only created problems in the trust department. If you have things of a sensitive nature that you need to discuss, the best person to talk to is a professional. At least they're required by law to keep their mouths shut.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by broahes
 


I don't think alcohol is addictive as a substance, but I do feel that some people are prone to become addicted both mentally and physically to it.


Isn't this a bit of a contradiction?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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Reply to post by halfoldman
 


I drink heavily about one weekend out of every 4-6 months. I will take a sip here or there, though (liquor. I hate beer and wine).

But that weekend I get stupid smashed.

I do it because it feels good just to let go every once in a while.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
reply to post by broahes
 


I don't think alcohol is addictive as a substance, but I do feel that some people are prone to become addicted both mentally and physically to it.


Isn't this a bit of a contradiction?



How can I be more clear?

I don't think alcohol is addictive.. I think people with a certain mindset can become addicted to the mental/physical effects of alcohol.. and those people over a long term heavy use can become physically dependent to the point that they need help to get off of it without health risks.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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Originally posted by darkelf
AA takes the blame from the person and places it on an object


That is a false statement. They teach very much that as you said, jerks that stop drinking are still jerks.. they teach to change the person, which is the problem.



[edit on 9-6-2010 by broahes]



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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I completely agree with darkelfs statements and those who have stated that 12 step groups are cults. Sponsers are not professionals and a lot of my issues triggered their issues which made things...messy. I dealt with that for 3 years. Do take it to a professional.

What I know, for me, is I had childhood issues as well as being a survivor of a violent crime a week before my 21st birthday and while I'm 2nd generation Irish which may have made me slightly predisposed to drinking - I'm also diabetic as well and both of these issues come from this line of the family - regardless, it was ultimately MY responsibility to deal with those issues.

Once I actually dealt with the issues, quit the blaming and got out of being a victim - I'm fine. I can kick back and have a few beers now and then without the desire to drink myself into a blackout. It's honestly amazing.

Recovery IS possible.

I'd like to thank those who spoke out. I've seen these threads pop up before and SO much wanted to say something but didn't want to put myself out there... Darkelf moved me because I could so much relate and I think it's high time (lol) more of us spoke up on the issue.




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