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Dholavira

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posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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One of the benchmarks on which a civilization can be judged as Advanced is Urbanization/Town Planning.
The level of urbanization of its cities/settlements can be judged by the proper layout of the city/settlement, sanitation facilities including Water collection & Distribution, Drainage & Sewage.

Indus Valley Civilization is so distinct from all other civilizations before or around its own period in this aspect.
Dholavira – the fifth largest of the Indus valley cities/Settlements and which is a recent excavation (discovered in 1967 and excavated in 1989) is a prime example for this.




Dholavira, an ancient city, and locally known as Kotada Timba Prachin Mahanagar Dholavira, is one of the largest and most prominent archaeological sites in India, belonging to the Indus Valley Civilization. It is located on the Khadir bet island in the Kutch Desert Wildlife Sanctuary, Great Rann of Kutch, Kachchh district of Gujarat, India. The site is surrounded by water in the monsoon season.[1] The site was occupied from c.2650 BCE, declining slowly after about 2100 BCE. It was briefly abandoned and reoccupied until c.1450 BCE.[2] The site was discovered in 1967-8 by J.P. Joshi and is the fifth largest Harappan site in the Indian subcontinent, and has been under excavation almost continuously since 1990 by the Archaeological Survey of India. Eight large urban centers have been discovered: Harappa, Mohenjo Daro, Ganeriwala, Rakhigarhi, Kalibangan, Rupar, Dholavira, and Lothal.
Dholvaira - from wikipedia.org


Archaeological Survey of India's (ASI) web-page on the Excavations at Dholavira

A Computer Graphics Reconstruction of Dholavira

Some Photos of Dholavira


Lothal - The World's Earliest Known Dock is in the same area/state of Gujarat.

[edit on 7/6/10 by coredrill]

[edit on 7/6/10 by coredrill]

[edit on 7/6/10 by coredrill]




posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by coredrill
 


Thanks for all the links. Nice post.


It is pretty cool all of that was accomplished in the third millenia BC. India's history is very interesting to me and I am enjoying looking through all your links.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 03:31 PM
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I especially liked the graphic reconstruction link. To think that this town was 4500 years old, at least. wow!!

Thanks for bringing this up coredrill, you earned your S&F mate



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