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Early 1900s in Colour

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posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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Wow...these are really great.

Seeing these old images in color seems to make it more...real. Just seem different than seeing the same type images in black & white. With old B&W pics, there's kind of a disconnect.

But with these...

Like, the picture of the old cars, the trees and the tall building. I almost feel like I could step right into it.

Anyway, very cool. S&F!




posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by LordBaskettIV
 


I never even thought of that, and your soo right.
Think about all the pictures that were never shown as well. it'd be nice to get a full book of those pictures, Their is one if you search the photographers name theirs been a book published with what seems like it would have many more pictures for i haven't actually seen the book with my own eye's but looks as if the books prob at least 200-300 pages



posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:27 PM
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Great great post! I really enjoyed looking at those and have passed them on as well. Amazing some of the fine art or (photos) such as these can go for so long and remain unseen by so many. It is stuff like this that makes me love the power of the internet!



posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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The Iraqi women struck me the most as their outfits seem more similar to what is worn throughout the caucasus'. Did Islam really destroy that much of the culture in the middle east in the past 100 years?



posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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I guess wearable "dental floss" was not invented by our misguided generation after all:




Presursor to Nike? I absolutely love these sneakers! They sure don't make them like they used to:



--airspoon



posted on Jun, 6 2010 @ 11:53 PM
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What a great find. Loved the clothes, costumes, even those Holland shoes! Nice to see different countries. A true step back in time...



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 12:06 AM
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this is another one from the same period that wasn't in the first set of pics
(would love to add the picture but it say's registration for the media server is disabled at the moment or something along those lines)

28.media.tumblr.com...



Photographer: Stephane Passet, July 1914. “The Moulin Rouge nighclub in Paris, home of the scandalous cancan.”
Source: Okuefuna, D., (2008), The Dawn of the Colour Photograph, Albert Kahn’s archives of the Planet, Princeton University Press.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 12:29 AM
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Here's a picture from National Geographic that was added on the comments section.

That is sure one disturbing way to go. Looks like there are bowls placed just out of reach.




posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 06:20 AM
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Not all Muslim women ever wore veils. Many in rural villages did not, and Kurds never wore veils.
The Iraqi picture looks like Kurds.
As for the Iranian school picture, they are all female so naturally they wouldn't be veiling though I wonder who took the picture. But I've seen photos of Muslim women, early 1900s, without veils. I think once they were out of the public eye, it didn't matter. The photographers were men, in general. In any case most in the picture are still young children, another reason for no veils. When the Shah (father of the Shah deposed in 1979) passed a law in the early 1930s forbidding veils, it was a shock to most women.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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Great post, it's amazing to see they really weren't much different from us (bar their fashion sense, anyway!). To me it seems people were a lot less focused on their appearance in those days, my Grandparents confirm this. At times they seem bewildered by how much time the younger generations of my family spend on making themselves look "nice"

The picture of the Sphinx is very interesting. This picture really makes it look like the "Lions" paws were added on at a later date. I quick search of Google comes up with a few images that present the situation in a clearer format. IMO it really doesn't look like they had much to go on in deciding the Sphinx was a repesentation of a Lion.

This has opened so many questions for me. Most of the esoteric theories surrounding the Sphinx are centred around the theory that it used to be a Lion. What if it was something entirely different?

Definately deserving of its own post IMO!



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 06:29 AM
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Thanks for the link OP.
I just watched a doco on this guy a few day ago on SBS Australia.
like looking back in time.

Cheers.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 07:19 AM
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The Sphinx was a "craggy ruin" when Napoleon arrived in Egypt in the late 18th century, said Lehner. The French cleared away some of the sand burying the animal. It was restored again in the 1920s. White limestone blocks now line parts of the sphinx's paws and stomach, contrasting sharply with the worn blocks of previous restorations. The head is a yellowish brown, evidence of millennia of wear. On the walkway in front of the Sphinx's paws, Mr Peter Longfield, a tourist from South Carolina, stared at the reclining lion. "Awesome," he said. But he was less impressed with the restoration, saying the new limestone blocks look a bit out of place near the worn body and blocks from earlier restorations.


Source

I think the sphinx legs/paws have undergone extensive refurbishment over the decades.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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Those pics are absolutely the most interesting thing I've seen on the web in a long, long time. Captivating.

The world was just entirely different then and when I look at those images I can't help but have a deep sense of loss.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by LordBaskettIV
 


Clearly you have a deep understanding of modern middle eastern history, so I'm sure I won't be telling you anything you don't already know, but Iraq was part of the Ottoman empire, which included the Caucasus'. The style of dress in both areas being similar at the time is hardly surprising. The peasant clothing of both areas probably resembles Turkish dress, as does the dress of the people in the greek picture and the style is entirely different to that of the Arab pictures from Palestine & Lebanon.

Iran was ruled by European nations so the fact that children in a school would wear a European style dress as a uniform is hardly surprising. These look like wealthy children (healthy & clean) so you could also infer that these were the children of the local upper class, who would normally emulate the style of those in power. The style looks like British school uniforms of the time.

Besides any of that, you wouldn't expect a person in the west to be wearing the fashions of the early 20th century under the guise of "culture" so would you be a dear and stop gumming up an interesting thread with you personal prejudices and ignorance. Do some reasearch on the cultures you're blaming Islam for destroying.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 07:58 AM
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Originally posted by LordBaskettIV
The two pictures that caught my attention were the Iraq and Iran pictures. Women(or girls in the iran pic) and not a burqa in sight.

Iran
citynoise.org...

Iraq
citynoise.org...

[edit on 6-6-2010 by LordBaskettIV]


Actually that's not Iran... That's India.... The titles are above the pictures... Not below.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
The world was just entirely different then and when I look at those images I can't help but have a deep sense of loss.


I completely agree. I was thinking the same exact thing. It's as if the world has turned a corner (for the worse) since the time of these photos. It's as if the world was a certain way throughout our entire existence on this planet, only having changed in the relatively short time after these photos were taken.

These photos seem to portray the world as it is supposed to be. Many of these photos capture a specific moment that you would see plastered on your processed food products in the grocery store to give us the illusion of a whole or natural food product.

As much as I enjoy the creature comforts of our modern era with all of its clever and useful technology, I would give them up in heartbeat for even just a taste of the pure and simple life that these photos project into my mind.

Another thing is that these photos seem to perfectly portray the culture of each country and region, cultures that are now lost to history, save for ceremony or tourism. The photographer did this on purpose, I suppose, though it subtracts nothing. It's a shame that each identifying culture isn't as rich today as it had been for millennia leading up to and including the time of these photographs. What happened? Could this be one of the consequences of globalization?

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:09 AM
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Anyone know if this book is available in the US? I did an Amazon search, it recognized what I was looking for but didn't have the book.

www.albertkahn.co.uk...



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:30 AM
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F'd & the S.

Very nice. Thanks for the link.

Here's another link to Shorpy's page.. Many from the early 1900's and late 1800's and even before. It's not all color (though they do have a color section, but it's mostly pics fromt he early 50's and later), but all these pictures are high resolution. All types of photography from glass negatives to Kodachrome transparencies.

There's "Always Something Interesting" at Shorpy's.

Here's an example (files size reduced for thread post).


Medium-format negative by Johh Collier for the Office of War Information.

[edit on 7-6-2010 by tyranny22]



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by LordBaskettIV
The two pictures that caught my attention were the Iraq and Iran pictures. Women(or girls in the iran pic) and not a burqa in sight.

Iran
citynoise.org...

Iraq
citynoise.org...

[edit on 6-6-2010 by LordBaskettIV]


Yes, that struck me too ... seems like time doesn't always move forwards !



>>>OP



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 

Actually titles are bellow. But I think it's foolish to think all women wear burkas in them two countries. Especially village folk.

I've seen those pics before, really interesting.





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