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First Photo of India's first ever nuclear submarine: Arihant

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posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:10 AM
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Here it is..
After much secrecy, subterfuge and media shielding, the government inadvertantly (?)
slipped this photo into their yearly progress 'report card' that they share in parliament.



Source/Copyright: Livefist Blog



Thoughts people? All publicized information claims this to be an SSBN with vertical launch tubes containing single warhead missiles (MiRV eventually claimed) with a current range of a mere 750km (5000km eventually claimed).

By the looks of that photo seems a little unfinished to me



Wiki on it: en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 5-6-2010 by Daedalus3]




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:23 AM
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tech support for this submarine's computer system is based in Des Moines,
Iowa....funny huh?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by Daedalus3
 


No offense, but that sub looks really bad, I don't know if it's a bad picture. looks like cover of stain or is a bad paint job. I wouldn't accept an invitation for the inaugural trip. LOL.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by SUICIDEHK45
 


Well that just seems wrong on multiple levels doesn't it? From the US and Indian perspective!


Where you you happen upon this?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by Daedalus3
 


I was just kidding!



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Yea .. maybe its a bit of both?

Again photos of nuclear submarines coming from developing countries (and those who are building them now) aren't really commonplace.
so all inclusive, this photo (and the sub) pathetic or not is quite a big thing.




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by SUICIDEHK45
 


You got me!


Here's the extent of you getting me and then me figuring it out:
Me googling for the connection and this thread showing up as the first result!!


Cricky! You've linked the two inseparably for all time!

*On a separate note, hats of to the ATS tech team for Search Engine Optimization! ~ Maybe they get help from Des Moines
~



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 12:37 AM
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It looks outdated by modern standards. But I imagine it's good enough for India's needs. I doubt Pakistan or Iran could seriously threaten it.



posted on Jun, 8 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by Schaden
 


It is a nuclear ballistic missile submarine and so it is most definitely required to 'deter' other nuclear powers from conducting a pre-emptive nuclear first strike due to the fact that it can still execute an effective second strike capability. Note that Pakistan (or Iran, doubt Iran is a foe to India though) do not have the qualitative or quantitative capability to conduct a successful pre- emptive first strike (conventional or nuclear) on India to cripple its nuclear capability.

Hence it would seem that this boat (and its siblings/successors) are intended for more formidable foe(s), mainly the likes of China.
The current SLBM reach is a mere 750km, so it would need to get in and around (patrol area 1000km off major cities?) the Eastern Chinese shorelines if any effective deterrence is to be achieved.

So if it does not meet that job profile, its not quite there yet. Upgrades on the SLBM range (a must) and possibly on the acoustic signature seem to be the way to go.

For the uninitiated who seem to be unimpressed with the bad metal work on the outside; yes it does look shabby though I'm no sub expert so I'd wait for the likes of OT1999 to comment, but that is not the important bit. The important bit is that the Indians have apparently achieved the ability to miniaturize nuclear reactors such that they can be fit into subs, a capability though existing for almost half a century, is only achieved by the big 5.

In addition to this boat, upto 4 (realistically 2?) sister vessels are planned, and an Akula II class SSN is being leased by the same navy for 10 years starting next year. Thus, projecting capabilities into this decade, the Indian nuclear submarine force aims to be a key player in the IoR and possibly even the ASEAN regions.



posted on Jun, 8 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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Explanation: Let me guess its bouyancy and propulsion systems... hmmm could it be 4 aquatic Pachyderms standing on Gamera's that go all the way down???


Personal Disclosure:
S&F!

P.S. I'm quite suprised that its not powered by some Vimanas wonder device! :shk:



posted on Jun, 8 2010 @ 09:10 AM
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So why can't North Korea have one? Why do we think India is less of a threat?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by earthdude
 


Cause:

1) North Korea cant build one (yet)
2) If they tried, they would be slapped with sanctions and rhetoric, even from their big brother China.

Bottom-line: nobody has the economic, political or military might to arm twist India into doing or not doing something anymore. This may have been possible partially in all 3 cases say perhaps upto 15-20 years ago, but not anymore. Most of the west has the ability and strategic motive to do that with NK.

Tough luck NK.



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 08:31 AM
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Well this was a supersecret sub i don think any official photo is out..



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by earthdude
So why can't North Korea have one? Why do we think India is less of a threat?

What Daedalus3 said...also, India is, frankly, a natural ally to the U.S. and counterbalance in Asia to China. They are the world's largest democracy and have absorbed many aspects of Western culture and principles (again, Democracy, especially) from their time as British Colony. Tacitly, it may serve our interests for India to develop forces like this, even as we publicly decry nuclear proliferation. India ain't gonna use this sub against the U.S. or Europe. It's just not gonna happen.

While we do have the worry over the ever present tensions with Pakistan, those two countries seem to have largely passed through their own Cold War insanities - much like the US and USSR went through - and have pulled back from the hair-trigger they were on for more than a decade. Bad things could still happen between them, but it seems far less likely currently. The big danger, IMO, is if Pakistan destabilizes and radicals take control there.



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 11:10 AM
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Daedalus3 and others,

I agree..this is India's first "branching out into this field of ICBM type boats. This is more of a prototype for upcoming developments. What works, doesnt work, needs improving and modification will be incorporated into the next generation of boats.

I immediately noticed what we call the turtleback configuration...both in the photo and the wiki sketch. This can be seen on our boomers...current and past boats. This turtleback houses the hatch/hatch mechanisms. mechanism...many of the hatch links or operating rods..and whatever other equipment is needed. Turtlebacks on todays type of boats are usually indicative of a boomer class.

While we still do so on our boomers...I am wonderinig why they use fairwater planes on the sail structure instead of some kind of retractable bow planes. Retractable bow planes seem to be the trend in boats of recent.
But then again ...most boats using such planes are attack boats and are built for more speed. This is not necessarily the case with a boomer...stealth is priority until they must launch.

Another item of curiosity. I hope the Indian Navy has progressed further than the Russians and do not use liquid fueled rockets in their boomers. Solid fuel is sufficiently peculear...but liquid fuel..in a confined space....what were the Russians thinking???

As to the metal work..some of you have not seen the welding as have I coming out of Electric Boat on their 688 class. I hope alot of this has been rectified by the newer industrial wire feed systems of today.

With better missles/longer range will come under ice development and capability ..both in attack boats as well as this type.

Also of interest is that they claim 40% fuel rods. I believe this is higher percentage than most commercial fuel rods. Longer core life if managed correctly in a PWR system. I trust there is already design work in progress for the refueling or deactivation as newer models come on line.
I am not familiar of the commercial side of Indian reactor capabilities. Do they even have a trained pool of fuelers/refuelers and the facilities for doing such radioactive/contamination work. Drydock facilities et al. It is rather involved and complicated work to do safely and dispose of the waste products. Also it takes some time to properly train and maintain qualified peoples to do this type of work...in addition to the expenses.
Also to train nuclear qualified peoples to do this work in shipyards or in the Navy itself.

I saw no such support equipment familiar to me a the Mumbai...area from google earth. I should probably seek such answers elsewhere.

Ahh..I see..I am looking in the wrong areas...Vishakapatnam, Andhra Pradesh is the location and shall be google earthed soon enough.

Six torpedo tubes..foreward..interesting.

Would also be interested to know what type of steel is being used in the pressure hull.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 11:36 AM
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whos to say its steel dont the russians have an all titianium hull? good call on wanting to know what its made of as difrent metals have different acustiocal properties?



posted on Oct, 2 2010 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by KilrathiLG
whos to say its steel dont the russians have an all titianium hull? good call on wanting to know what its made of as difrent metals have different acustiocal properties?


No, only russian subs what used all titanium hull were Alfa-class. Titanium hull is very expensive and hard to maintain... but it helps subs to dive deeper.

Metal itself does not help much at all (if any) to submarines acoustic signature, it's more about the shape.



btw: I think that the "INS Arihant" is still a diesel submarine.



posted on Oct, 2 2010 @ 11:35 PM
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India cant even build adequate buildings for the upcoming games never mind an SSBN. Have a look at these news.bbc.co.uk... www.bbc.co.uk... www.foxnews.com...



posted on Oct, 3 2010 @ 07:20 AM
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Indian industry did get lot of help from the russians. Indians are using Akula II (they leased one for 10-years) to train crew of Arihant, so it's probably quite similar to russian subs.

Quality? I guess we can't say anything about that... depends a lot of materials and skills of the workers.



posted on Oct, 3 2010 @ 04:26 PM
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Originally posted by Alvar
Indian industry did get lot of help from the russians. Indians are using Akula II (they leased one for 10-years) to train crew of Arihant, so it's probably quite similar to russian subs.

Quality? I guess we can't say anything about that... depends a lot of materials and skills of the workers.



I agree..most likely very similar to Russian designs.

Every class of vessel has it's teething problems. Either from the engineering or manufacturing side of the house but it effects all of the vessels produced. Teething problems are to be expected and eventually cleared up if proper designs and practices are used. It is the same with Aircraftl, tanks and other designs.

As to the titanium hulled subs..this has not worked out as well as the Press and other PR would have you think.
It is overated as a hull material in addition to being expensive. The exotic steels of which our submarines are built are difficult enough in manufacturing as well as welding. Titanium even more so.
Submarine hull material, even in steel, is a very carefully monitored and controlled process for quality. So too with the joining of such materials by welding. These are X-ray inspected welds as well as in certain areas they are magnetic tested for flaws. In other areas they are dye checked for flaws. All part of a critical inspection process. Big big bucks spent here to insure quality. And even with these extensive and expensive processes there have been difficulties.

Thanks,
Orangetom



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