Warning: EPA Air Quality Results Show High Levels Of VOC In Venice, LA Area

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posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 07:38 AM
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OK, the EPA has basically been worthless in the Gulf response.

They promised daily readout of air quality to the public.
Most recent data is two days old, and is very vague and incomplete.

However, the data available shows toxic levels of VOCs.


Studies have found that levels of several organics average 2 to 5 times higher indoors than outdoors.

No standards have been set for VOCs in non industrial settings. OSHA regulates formaldehyde, a specific VOC, as a carcinogen. OSHA has adopted a Permissible Exposure Level (PEL) of .75 ppm, and an action level of 0.5 ppm. HUD has established a level of .4 ppm for mobile homes. Based upon current information, it is advisable to mitigate formaldehyde that is present at levels higher than 0.1 ppm.

www.epa.gov...

So, benzine, probably the most dangerous VOC is quite a bit more toxic than formaldehyde, so I would suggest the we could use .5 ppm as a conservative base for dangerous levels.

Interesting, that OSHA has no standards for the VOC's in oil, according to the EPA. I will get to that later.



You will notice that on 6/2, the VOC ppm was a whopping .759! That would make indoor levels between 1.4 - 2.1 ppm. VERY TOXIC!!! And then there's a day with 1.1 levels.

Now, since the EPA is pretty lame, I did some deeper digging for toxic benzine levels, and found this.


The total VOC action levels proposed by URS are apparently intended to protect workers, but are well above occupational exposure guidelines for benzene. For benzene, the ACGIH time-weighted average (TWA) for benzene is 0.5 ppm, the NIOSH TWA is 0.1 ppm, and the OSHA TWA is 1.0 ppm.

Furthermore, the ACGIH 15 minute short-term exposure limit for benzene is 2.5 ppm

www.atsdr.cdc.gov...

Indoor levels are very close to 15 minute exposure limits. People could be breathing close to these levels for hours, if not days!



2.7 ppm.
The levels outdoors are toxic, imagine what the levels indoors are like!

Why is the EPA not at least giving people a warning? They're saying the air is just fine.

And here's the crazy thing, the EPA, even though they say they're monitoring the whole Gulf Coast, only the data from two locations are available. The Mississippi/Alabama link doesn't contain any data.

Here's where all the data was collected from:
www.epa.gov...

Go to the table, where is says view, and the link will open data in new _

I get a very bad feeling about this.



[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]

[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]

[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]

[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]

[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 07:56 AM
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Jeez, by July this oil spill will be atrocious. it will be even worse when hurricane season starts. Now see why we should have other alternate fuel sources than oil? This Bs wouldn't have happened. But the oil companies back in the 70's stopped the water car from happening. Karma biting them in the ass.




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by dragnet53
Jeez, by July this oil spill will be atrocious. it will be even worse when hurricane season starts. Now see why we should have other alternate fuel sources than oil? This Bs wouldn't have happened. But the oil companies back in the 70's stopped the water car from happening. Karma biting them in the ass.



Current situation requires immediate action, or millions will die from this.

Yes, we need alternative sources, but as long as government and big business is in bed with oil companies like BP, we will never get it.

People will have to take what they deserve FROM the government.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:15 AM
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I don't know, maybe people here on ATS are not smart enough to understand the data.

I made it as simple as possible.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Why are you quoting formaldehyde levels and saying it's bezene?

Also, the figures are of the total VOC's collected, can you provide a breakdown of all Volatile Organic Compounds collected in the samples you're talking about?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
Why are you quoting formaldehyde levels and saying it's bezene?

Also, the figures are of the total VOC's collected, can you provide a breakdown of all Volatile Organic Compounds collected in the samples you're talking about?


Show me where the EPA breaks down the VOC's in their samples, and I will hold your hand to lead you to the data.

Jeez, is there ANYTHING the government does that you actually question?

I posted toxic benzene levels with a link for further reading. Did you actually read the OP?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


No, you showed graphs showing VOC's.

That is all.

You've made a leap of logic by saying it's benzene.

Where in your sources does it say that benzene was even collected, and at the levels that you say they are at?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 08:50 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


No, you showed graphs showing VOC's.

That is all.

You've made a leap of logic by saying it's benzene.

Where in your sources does it say that benzene was even collected, and at the levels that you say they are at?


That's kinda like saying a dead dolphin covered in oil may have died from food poisoning.

Any VOC at those levels is toxic. What part of that confuses you? IF it were benzene, it will be deadly within weeks.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Look, I'm trying to help people here. Folks are reporting smelling the oil. If they can smell it, it's probably not good for them.

Would you hold a baby in your arms while you fuel up your car. You can smell the gas, and you know it is not good to breath in.

Now, if the VOC levels in the area of a major oil spill are showing high, wouldn't you be concerned, if you lived in the area.

The problem, is the EPA is not telling people, to let them make up their own minds.

These people WILL DIE if they keep breathing these levels.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 09:16 AM
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Concerns over the health effects of the spill grew this week as more workers and residents of the coastal areas reported symptoms such as headaches and breathing problems. So far, about 60 exposure-related complaints have been filed with the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals.


www.latimes.com...

The major question, is the government is going to have to eventually do something, as people start to panic... Move them to the FEMA camps?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


I'd call it fear mongering myself..but I digress...

So basically, what you're saying here is that the EPA is unreliable and isn't telling us that the air quality near the gulf is actually toxic.

Yet they have set up a page specifically for monitoring the air around the oil spill area...

There are also these two pages that are of use:

gulfcoast.airnowtech.org...

www.airnow.gov...

There are a couple of isolated areas that are high, but if you look at the second link, more specifically, Los Angeles, you'll see that the air quality in the Gulf is still quite good.

I also note the this notice which is posted at the top of the gulf air monitoring page:


EPA's air monitoring conducted through June 3, 2010, has found that air quality levels for ozone and particulates are normal on the Gulf coastline for this time of year.
EPA has observed odor-causing pollutants associated with petroleum products along the coastline at low levels. Some of these chemicals may cause short-lived effects like headache, eye, nose and throat irritation, or nausea. People may be able to smell some of these chemicals at levels well below those that would cause short-term health problems.


That would explain the above link.



[edit on 5/6/10 by Chadwickus]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


I'd call it fear mongering myself..but I digress...

So basically, what you're saying here is that the EPA is unreliable and isn't telling us that the air quality near the gulf is actually toxic.

Yet they have set up a page specifically for monitoring the air around the oil spill area...

There are also these two pages that are of use:

gulfcoast.airnowtech.org...


Chart only shows ozone and particulate 2.5 levels. You should know about PM2.5, as we discussed that many times in Chemtrail research.

Yet, that chart does not say anything about VOC's. Deliberate mislead.
Some may call it disinfo. Interesting to note that Jackson Road is showing an AQI of 123. Wow! Must be getting the brunt of the burning. Smoke from burning oil will run up PM2.5 levels. Wonder what the VOC levels in that area show.

Too bad EPA is only monitoring two point in the entire gulf, and those two point are with 30 miles of each other!



www.airnow.gov...

There are a couple of isolated areas that are high, but if you look at the second link, more specifically, Los Angeles, you'll see that the air quality in the Gulf is still quite good.

I also note the this notice which is posted at the top of the gulf air monitoring page:


EPA's air monitoring conducted through June 3, 2010, has found that air quality levels for ozone and particulates are normal on the Gulf coastline for this time of year.
EPA has observed odor-causing pollutants associated with petroleum products along the coastline at low levels. Some of these chemicals may cause short-lived effects like headache, eye, nose and throat irritation, or nausea. People may be able to smell some of these chemicals at levels well below those that would cause short-term health problems.


Yes, I'm glad we can expose the blatant lies coming out from the EPA.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Another thing I do not see being monitored is oxygen levels. Oil fumes will displace oxygen, basically asphyxiating. This could explain some of the immediate light headedness.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


ummm....y'all do know that the mississippi delta is as north to mississippi as you can get before you hit tennessee, right? i live in central mississippi and the delta is two hours north of me. in other words ,if you were in clarksdale(heart of delta) it would take a four 1/2 hour drive down the interstate going 70 mph before you hit biloxi(coastal mississippi). im not saying the air isnt toxic in the gulf( i've got stories on top of stories of how workers are getting deathly ill from cleaning up the crude oil.) my point is how reliable can the data be when it doesnt even apply to the region in question. if the air in the delta was poisoned, everyone south of it would have already dropped like flies.

[edit on 5-6-2010 by riffraff]Ok, now that you've changed the title of the thread my post is irrelevant

[edit on 5-6-2010 by riffraff]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by riffraff
 


Here's the spot where they are sampling from.



I would say, it's a good sampling point. Problem is, there is only one reporting VOC levels, and they are showing to be dangerously high, not to mention 2 days behind.

And where is the breakdown of the VOC's?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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I would be concerned about the oil going into the Mississippi, I do not have the time to do in depth research into such, yet I am sure people are drinking water from the Mississippi, I am also concerned about if and how it could be drawn into rainclouds and rained into our reservoirs down here in the south. I am a little ignorant about oil in water going up into the clouds and raining on us, I am not sure if its structure density, for example would prevent such occurrence on the top side, yet what about the broken down oil where the molecular structure has lost most of its density.. Yet their is no doubt this oil will somehow be harmful to Human health somehow as well..



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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Yes, oil releases VOCs.Which are BAD, to put it in a nutshell. I was watching a news segment last night and some shore business owners were complaining about the smell.

The health and environmental consequences from this are going to be felt for decades.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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Yes, oil releases VOCs.Which are BAD, to put it in a nutshell. I was watching a news segment last night and some shore business owners were complaining about the smell.

The health and environmental consequences from this are going to be felt for decades.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:14 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Yes, oil releases VOCs.Which are BAD, to put it in a nutshell. I was watching a news segment last night and some shore business owners were complaining about the smell.

The health and environmental consequences from this are going to be felt for decades.


Yes, even the EPA admits this on their website.


# “Gas Station-Like” Odor

* If you smell a ‘gas station’ like odor – the odor you might smell while filling up your car – it may be volatile organic compounds, or VOCs.
* The key toxic VOCs in most oils are benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene.
* Exposure to low levels of VOCs may cause temporary irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. It is possible that people with asthma may be more sensitive to the effect of inhaled VOCs. The VOC smell may give you a headache or upset stomach but is not expected to cause long term health effects. If you are sensitive to VOCs, you should stay indoors to limit your exposure, close windows and doors, and set your air conditioner to a recirculation mode. The smell may become stronger if the wind or weather changes.
* Historical data on oil spills indicate that VOCs are likely to evaporate, disperse and/or react quickly after the oil reaches the surface of the water.
* Currently, we are measuring very low levels of VOCs. We will continue to monitor the air and if we begin to detect VOC levels that may be harmful we will provide updates to the public. For up-to-date information on air quality and monitoring data along the Gulf Coast, please see www.epa.gov/bpspill/air.html.


www.epa.gov...

Very low levels of VOCs? That's just an outright lie!

[edit on 5-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:55 AM
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Look what happened
when the guv said the air around the WTC was fine.
turned out it was not.

"The dust from the collapsed towers was "wildly toxic", according to air pollution expert and University of California Davis Professor Emeritus Thomas Cahill."

"Many of the dispersed substances (asbestos, crystalline silica, lead, cadmium, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are carcinogenic; other substances can trigger kidney, heart, liver and nervous system deterioration. This was well known by the EPA at the time of collapse.[3]

"This has led to debilitating illnesses among rescue and recovery workers, and the pulmonary fibrosis death of NYPD member Cesar Borja.[6][7][8][9] Increasing numbers of cases are appearing in which first responders are developing serious respiratory ailments.[10] Health effects also extended to some residents, students, and office workers of Lower Manhattan and nearby Chinatown"

From:
en.wikipedia.org...





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