Let's Talk Evaporation....Oil Evaporation

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posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 08:47 PM
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I've been looking over the conditions in which oil evaporates, (and yes, it does indeed evaporate ....not necessarily the vegetable oil in your frying pan), but crude does evaporate depending on the type it is, and it's environment. The proof that it is evaporating, no matter how slowly, is evidenced by the fact that you can smell it...in the vapors. This is toxic enough without consideration given to the additional chemicals being used to disperse it. The crude vapors are singularly toxic.

Another concern at this point...is... given the massive amounts of oil that are being forced into the gulf, will not some of the evaporated oil then be introduced (by rain) into our lakes, reservoirs, and fresh water?

I don't consider myself an alarmist, but I find the thought of this alarming, and it is quite possible, after all, given the magnitude of this disaster.

I'm aware that during the evaporation process, there is a certain "purification" which takes place. Nonetheless what could occur would be akin to an acid rain, creating issues with our fresh waters resources.

The rate of evaporation depends on the type oil, the climate it's in, the water temperature, and other factors. Apparently what is in the Gulf is a heavier, sticky, dark colored oil, prone to slow evaporation, but evaporation nonetheless.

I will post links shortly, provided there is any interest in this topic.




posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 09:31 PM
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This video might be elsewhere in one of the many threads about the oil leak. It's (I think) by Russian Scientists. The discussion about evaporation begins at about 2:45.




posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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This image was taken May 18th, but I wanted you guys to see how close to Tampa the black wave really is.

As this oil -contaminated- water reaches shores, such as the Louisiana wetlands, there could be opportunity for seepage into the water table.




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:11 AM
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Yes! Please do post links as I have been looking into this as well. I am very curious as to many ramifications of this epic assault on our ecosystem. It will not just affect fish, birds and beaches. In fact, there are already anecdotal reports of oil residue "rain" in mid-Texas! Check out this YouTube video citizen report:

LINK: www.youtube.com...

width="500" height="405"> "http://www.youtube.com/v/8WZnDYsnRP0&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0xcc2550&color2=0xe87a9f&border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="500" height="405">



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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Well,let us be clear here.

Petroleum is complex.

The volatiles do evaporate or flash off.That is the smell that people have reported smelling.Naptha,Kerosene,Gasoline,etc.

What is left floating and washing up on the beaches is the asphaltic tar and waxes,grease,the heavier petroleum products.

Ever heard of petroleum jelly?

The difference between the Gulf leak and the Exxon Valdez spill in Alsaka is water temperature.

The present disaster happened in warm waters and the oil is "sweet" oil very fluid.

The Alaskan crude is a lot heavier.

Those waxy residues washing up are going to be a bear to clean up.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by Rockerchic4God
 


Thanks for the video, here it is:




posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:14 AM
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Russian scientists spoke of the millions of gallons of a dispersing agent called Corexit 9500 which is poisoning the Gulf entirely. The acute toxicity of this chemical is deadly to all life not only the animals.

Here is an excerpt from the Abstract on Corexit 9500, Corexit 9527 and Corexit 9580: Basically what it says is that it kills anything that is living.

BP Oil has refused to stop using this deadly chemical and Russian scientists have predicted dthat the 2.61 ppm toxicity will become gasses that will be absorbed into the atmosphere, be absorbed into clouds, and then rain will contain this toxin and spread all over North America.
Corexit and the Rain

Sounds bad since the corexit can mix with the rain; however, the natural oil in this state is very unlikely to mix with the rain due to the Oils make-up. But if the oil were burned or anything else along those lines, forcing the oil to evaporate, then it is almost certainly PLAUSIBLE that it could rain black, but in its current state it is highly unlikely. Not impossible, but improbable at this time. But the rain will certainly have some components of the oil, but nothing that should be harmful. A I know a lot of "buts" and "however" in there, but that's how it is.

The dispersant on the other hand.... well, that can certainly mix with the rain in its current state and have a strong impact in rainfall and could potentially make the rain harmful and dangers, since it has a make up that is compatible with rain and is a very toxic chemical...



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:22 AM
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I just wonder if come hurricane season (which has started) if a good storm comes through and the leak is still going I'm sure there will be a good amount of oil in the water by then. But if a storm comes through, will the oil get sucked up and rained down on those in the path of the storm?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


precisely, what I am looking at is the resin or the OIL somehow getting into clouds and raining into our reservoirs, and I am sure at first children and elders will be getting sick. Of course this will be excused as natural illnesses, and then it will hit the populace. the question is thou, what can this oil do to man if it is consumed? The only good thing I guess is its organic, it may not be that harmful if consumed.. Yet if it is polluting our fresh water many years from now perhaps it will start being harmful after years of consumption via inert exposure.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


sure lets not forget storm surge either..

even if the oil does not become rain, imagine a 10 foot or more storm surge of OIL!!!



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


The answer is yes, the Oil will be forced upon the shore and in some cases up the mouth of the river and if the levee's break again.... Complete disaster once again in New Orleans that will be so much worse. The hurricane will start to siphon out the water from the oil well and thus spewing more oil from the leaking well (The storm will create pressure and force more oil out). After that the oil will be brought right along the coast of Louisiana and possibly up the water channels in lower Louisiana, including the Mississippi river and causing problems not only here in Louisiana, but all along Florida West coast, and Mississippi. This has the potential to be so much worse and make the gulf into the new dead sea, literally....



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Bicent76
 


Well the thing that has to be considered is that the oil will be diluted so to speak. Only the oil's basic components, the ones that can be turned into precipitation will be turned with the way the oil is now. Not including burning or anything else. But since it is so diluted and I do not know the science of basic oil compounds, I cannot go into anymore further detail except that it is certainly possible that the oil could be harmless, but then again it could be a concern. Will it be deadly? I do not believe so. The Corexit Dispersant seems to be the one to watch out for....



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:45 AM
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27 May 2010
Does crude oil evaporate?

It seems some kinds do evaporate BUT according to the US Environmental Protection Agency "these classifications are dynamic for spilled oils; weather conditions and water temperature greatly influence the behavior of oil and refined petroleum products in the environment. For example, as volatiles evaporate from a Class B oil, it may become a Class C oil.". Evaporation is not necessarily a good thing.

And a kind of crude that evaporates easily also "penetrate porous surfaces such as dirt and sand, and may be persistent in such a matrix" and "may be highly toxic to humans, fish, and other biota."


From Shores of Singapore

The article goes on to describe the different classes of oil, and how they evaporate. From reading the descriptions, I'm thinking we have a Class C oil. See what you think. Here's the link:
wildshores.blogspot.com...

[edit on 6/5/2010 by ladyinwaiting]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by ladyinwaiting
 


I agree with you Ladyinwaiting. Class C seems like it right now. What do you think about this? Do you think that a storm will hit and cause the oil to travel up the Mississippi river (Not all the way up, of course)? And then after naturally that oil would be evaporating over the cities and could potentially, become problematic...

[edit on Jun 5th 2010 by TheMythLives]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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I am thinking about its impact if it turns to rain in the midwest, and effects soil and crops.. Yet I am just trying to think of things happening before they do so I understand it better..



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


Hi! Good to see you, as ever, and thanks so much for your contributions.

I'm concerned that if evaporation and seepage doesn't get this mess into our fresh water, then a storm could.

Here is a link discussing the possibility of a hurricane. They are really just guessing what could happen, but it's interesting reading.

tpmdc.talkingpointsmemo.com...



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


Myth, I read a post of yours on another thread where you indicated you can smell the oil in New Orleans. Has this gotten any worse?

From what I've read, the fumes will affect children, the elderly, and people with lung problems such as Asthma and bronchitis first.

Have you heard anything about this happening? (Yet?)



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by ladyinwaiting
 


Yes, I believe that we have children complaining of breathing issues. Children that live closer to the coast. And they are being told that it is best for them to leave until the spill is cleaned up. But where do they expect these people to go? I mean really? The people down south of New Orleans are not rich people. They live simple lives. But yes children and adults both have begun to state they have respiratory problems. In St. Bernard parish they are talking about the same thing down in Delacroix (the end of the world). The smell is so bad in The Parish, especially in Delacroix. And extremely bad at night there. And St. Bernard is not far away from the city at all just a couple of miles.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by Bicent76
 


When this first happened, all I could think of was the dolphins, the marine life, and the breathtaking beaches on the Gulf.

But now, Bicent, we would be foolhardy not to consider these other catastrophes. This has to be controlled before August. I don't know how, but they must find a way. This could effect not only our fishing, but our crops as well, especially in the southeastern states.

Think of the cotton crops! Do you think they'll try to push slick-grey fabrics as the latest style?

[edit on 6/5/2010 by ladyinwaiting]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


I've heard rumors they will be requesting an evacuation. I hope that won't be necessary. It's so difficult, as you pointed out. And it's the poor who can't afford to leave who always seem to pay the heavy price.

The poor....and the stubborn.





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