Strange satellite image?

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posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:24 AM
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Notice the strange anomalie near Central America. Then choose 3 hour loop; all of the clouds disipate.

weather.unisys.com...



XL5

posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:30 AM
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Try the 12 hour loop for great justice (fun).



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:41 AM
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looks like nightfall obscuring the sattelite image to me...



sorry for it being so small, but the max file upload is 100k and the fullsize image would have been much too large. but anyway, that's from 2000Z to 2345Z.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:44 AM
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I had to do a 12 hour loop since the 3 hour was already a night loop. It look just like bad image processing in my opinion.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:52 AM
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Sorry, I usually only look at radar images in my local area. Feeling kinda stupid over the night-fall thing. It was the hole in the image that I really was wondering about anyway.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 12:57 AM
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At first I had no idea what that was until I watched the loop over and over. I think that is the sun's reflection on the water at just the right angle. You can follow the path across the planet and it flashes at one point in the path. Kinda cool actually.

My favorite radar images are the radial velocity images. Nice for checking out how bad the winds are in a storm. Also good way to watch for rotation.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 01:06 AM
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I came across a segment of what was called "flash radar", it was over Texas, does anyone know the explanation of this?

[edit on 10-6-2004 by cultureshock]



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 01:15 AM
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Are you talking about the image in this link?

members.tripod.com...

The area over Texas looks to be the result of a nexrad system in clear air mode. This mode is often used to pick up very light precip. Where I live at this mode is used to pick up snow. It does a much better job than normal mode. It will pick up light snow and flurries where normal mode will show nothing. Also low level scans can pick up a great deal of ground clutter as well. Was the radar being serviced? Was there simply a mode change that caused a badly distorted image. I have seen messed up images like that before. Its really not that uncommon.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 01:27 AM
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Yes, thanx, that's the one. Odd or not, I thought it was beautiful.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 03:29 AM
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It's called SunCross... it occurs when the Sun goes down, once the sun goes down all modes have to switch to IR. Notice how the clouds disipate from East to West, in a timely fashion as each frame passes. Each frame is a toll of one hour. Each time the frame changes nearly the entire time zone goes blank.

There is nothing significant on this image.


XL5

posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 03:59 AM
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LOL every zig has been take off and great justice has come. Sry, just had to.





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