It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

700 MHz Wireless microphones no good after June 12

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 02:39 PM
link   
I wanted to pass this along. I know some of you here would be interested in it.
I haven't seen it reported anywhere else.

Wireless microphones that operate at 700MHz prohibited after June 12, 2010.



The FCC is prohibiting the use of wireless microphones (and similar devices) that operate in the 700 MHz Band.


Source: www.fcc.gov...




posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 02:58 PM
link   
they can take my wireless headphone from my corpse.

Get your own damn frequency governments!



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 03:01 PM
link   
un what would be the rang on that? not that i care .....



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 03:05 PM
link   
I know that certain frequencies produce results in the human organism, but if anyone out there knows what 700 does to a person I would really find that kind of stuff interesting. Thanks for the heads up.



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 03:11 PM
link   
I think the whole band is off limits, even small range devices.

I'm not sure what effects it has on humans. I did find an article about it's effects on rats. It's an interesting read... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

Edit: Just found this... blogs.techrepublic.com.com...
Looks like there only doing it for the money. Their selling off the 700MHz band to a corporation.

[edit on 4-6-2010 by HrdCorHillbilly]



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 04:29 PM
link   
I use a Bayer wireless mike, it could be that range. Like most others, I discovered eventually that interference is cancelled out if you leave the mike switched on.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 12:13 PM
link   
How can they ban a frequency, or how can they tell if you are still using it?



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by SirJustin
How can they ban a frequency, or how can they tell if you are still using it?


Their the Government, they can do whatever they want to make a dollar.
The air waves no longer "belong to the people".

For the second part of your question... I have no idea. Maybe someone else can help answer that.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 08:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by SirJustin
How can they ban a frequency, or how can they tell if you are still using it?


They can 'ban' because they regulate the airwaves, they could tell if you were using such an incredibly low powered device if they were in the next room with detection equipment... Not very likely...

What will probably happen is that any equipment will most likely stop working as that bandwidth is over powered with whatever they have planned for it... The 'ban' as such will only be for the manufacturers, presumably that was a free bandwidth for low power devices, but now the licence has been sold.

edit: should of read the link first! - Not sold as such, set aside for emergency service use... So maybe your belting out showtune karaoke through your wireless mic when the fire brigade are attending an incident in the same street will get you into trouble.

[edit on 7/6/2010 by Now_Then]



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 09:00 AM
link   
Recently it has been discovered that the bee colony collapse disorder is a result of the wireless frequencies due to all the mobile towers and phones in use. I saw this reported on the news recently. However I think that that was actually discovered by a member here before that to be honest...
www.abovetopsecret.com...

. At any rate maybe they have narrowed it down to a specific frequency range and are actually doing something about it. Just my guess.

[edit on 6/7/2010 by CaptGizmo]



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 09:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by CaptGizmo
. At any rate maybe they have narrowed it down to a specific frequency range and are actually doing something about it. Just my guess.


I highly doubt that's the reason, shame really but big business really wouldn't give a hoot about that sort of thing unless it becomes financially worth while too.

But also the article said that the 700 mhz band will be used for emergency services, so the use of that band will go from the current sporadic use to continuous and heavy use.



posted on Jun, 8 2010 @ 12:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then
The 'ban' as such will only be for the manufacturers, ...

The link says nothing about a ban on manufacturers only. It says it is prohibiting the use of, not the sell or manufacturing of 700MHz band mics. Manufacturers probably have stopped making them already.


The FCC is only prohibiting the use of wireless microphones (and similar devices) that operate in the 700 MHz Band. You may continue to use wireless microphones (and similar devices) that operate on other broadcast frequencies.


EDIT:
I just had a thought. Maybe they will use the 700MHz band for RFID chips. They can operate at that frequency.
www.Linear.com...



[edit on 8-6-2010 by HrdCorHillbilly]



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 07:33 AM
link   
Wanted to update this... I found a list of the 700MHz auction winners. Verizon and AT&T where the big winners.
www.engadget.com...

Apparently "Block D" is still open. Is it going to be used for emergency personnel, or get auctioned off?



posted on Jun, 24 2010 @ 07:51 AM
link   
This is the first I've heard of this, and it's reminding me of the digital tv switch over, which means people are going to have to buy new products and either subscribe to their program or deal with seemingly selective quality.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 04:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by HrdCorHillbilly
EDIT:
I just had a thought. Maybe they will use the 700MHz band for RFID chips. They can operate at that frequency.
www.Linear.com...
[edit on 8-6-2010 by HrdCorHillbilly]


Well sure I guess they can... But RFID is very low power and localised (think the size of a large where house maximum, and usually much more localised like maybe when you get on a bus, that door way area.

If they say they are reserving it for emergency services radio comms then why not? Sure if it was being used for RFID all the receivers would get updates on the local traffic accidents, and therefore not monitor the flatscreen 40" plasma's Gary is shifting out of the back door into Jerrrys car, but I don't see any reason to question reserving a freq for emergency use - 700 mhz is useful, some mobiles work on 900mhz, I think the UK police tetra band is 800... Didn't even bother to google that - I just remember it gives them all headaches lol, still it works.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 04:50 AM
link   
i'm pretty sure that's the frequency on the newer police and probably other emergency radios. that's probably why. did someone say that already?



new topics

top topics



 
5

log in

join