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The mission to Mars that will never leave Earth

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posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 05:05 AM
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The mission to Mars that will never leave Earth


www.independent.co.uk

Yesterday, six men were locked into a spaceship simulator and will not be released for 17 months. Their challenge? To test the viability of a return trip to the Red Planet
Despite the fact that a real manned journey to the Red Planet is believed to be at least two decades away, the scientists organising the experiment say it will help them to understand how well human beings would cope with such a long journey in isolation. The crew will have no access to telephones, television or any other mode
(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 05:05 AM
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During nearly two years of isolation, the crew members – three Russians, a Chinese, a Frenchman and an Italian – will experience many of the conditions likely to be encountered by astronauts on a real space flight, except for radiation and weightlessness.
A 20–minute delay will be built into communications with the control centre to simulate an interplanetary mission and the crew will be given an identical diet to that used for the International Space Station
The Mars500 project, which is located in Russia's Institute of Biomedical Problems, conducted a simulation last year for 105 days.
The ESA said astronauts taking parts in the experiments would go down in history as pioneers.



Mars500 overview
Mars500 photo gallery


Mars500 video

(click to open player in new window)



Zelong.

www.independent.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 4/6/10 by Zelong]



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 05:20 AM
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They have been doing similar research at antarctic bases for forty years that I know of. Dark for six months, deadly freezing cold outside, no visitors, no TV, no newspapers, nowhere to visit. Pretty much like deep space.

People do have accidents, and there ain't no dialing 911 either.
And you have to improvise, you cannot call a service guy to come and fix your washing machine.
People go crazy too.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by Silver Shadow
 
Yes Silver Shadow, "People go crazy too" bush madness I've seen it and nearly suffered it too so I got out and I remember reading about vitamin D deficiencies through lack of sunlight, depression as well as weaker immune systems experiment down the Antarctic.


Scientists learn space lessons from Antarctic bases
Pregnancies, brain surgery
In particular, NASA has shown interest in the division's decades-old experience in using super-generalist doctors at its bases. Some of these have been recruited from rural Australia, who are adept at tackling just about any medical challenge.

Doctors down south have conducted brain surgery, fixed fractures and given counselling on mental health problems.

"We have managed pregnancies in Antarctica. That is part of the medical spectrum we have to deal with," Mr Ayton said.

Such broad experience would be crucial on a long-term mission to Mars or beyond. Other medical conditions also present challenges.
Studies have shown Antarctic expeditioners suffer vitamin D deficiencies through lack of sunlight, depression as well as weaker immune systems.

Mr Ayton said studies have shown the reactivation of latent viruses, such as the Epstein-Barr virus or other members of the herpes virus family.

"It's not fully known to date what causes immune suppression. We've looked at psychological factors on the immune system. We've looked at vitamin D effects on the immune system and the stresses in small, confined environments," he said, adding studies have shown similar changes to the immune system in space.......

Hearing voices
Mental health is another top issue.

Being confined to a small base with a dozen or so colleagues for months away from family and friends can be a major source of stress for some expeditioners.

Mr Lugg and Mr Ayton said the vast number of people adapted well to life in Antarctica with only very rare cases of expeditioners suffering mental breakdowns.




Zelong.

[edit on 5/6/10 by Zelong]



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 01:06 AM
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Just the thought of being stuck for 17 months gives me the shivers. I would not be able to do it, I almost want to go outside and run a mile and spread my wings! haha



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 01:07 AM
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Sounds like a good plan to send them all barking mad, just like those who organised it.

It makes ME barking mad as well because I cannot understand governments who would rather spend trillions on pointless space research than help people here on earth.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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Three Russians?
A balnced scientific exercise?



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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ppfffftttt, what a waste of time.

If you really want to see the effects of longterm deprivation and confinement, all one needs to do is go to any prison and visit the AdSeg section, more commonly known as solitary.

Those people living in maybe an 8 x 12 cell with no interaction with the outside world at all. A mattress, a toilet and maybe some books if their lucky.

Some criminals can live their WHOLE lives under these conditions, if they werent crazy when they got there, they'll be crazy when they leave.



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