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We can't possibly get off oil, and its products are worse for the environment than crude is.

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posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 01:52 AM
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I hate to say it but its hopeless. Even if we found a viable solution to the energy needs of oil we cannot go without its products. It would be like proposing that humans give up computers. The computers we use can't exist without oil, and not even because of the energy we get from it.

As long as this is the reality there will be spills, but the real kicker is that crude oil is nowhere near as bad for the environment as the products we make from it. Oil isn't going away, because even if we replaced the energy needs we'd still need the oil roughly as much anyways. That means that replacing the energy completely would equate to wasting that energy extracted while reaching for its other components.

So before you go trying to scream about oil spills consider that the PC you're using to do it with was made with oil. The radio or TV you first heard about the spill with was '... ... ...'. When TIME magazine puts out a grocery store checkout isle photo journal (and overcharges for it) the glossy inks they used to make it wouldn't be possible without oil. After debating online, the bed you will sleep in was made with oil. If you go and protest oil and get hurt, pretty much everything at the hospital was made with oil. Modern life wouldn't be possible without oil.

Some more things made with oil:

This is a list of some of the products made from oil. Nearly everything in our lives is made from oil, made by machinery and systems dependent on oil, and transported by oil as either gas or diesel fuel.

Ammonia, Anesthetics, Antihistamines, Artificial limbs, Artificial Turf, Antiseptics, Aspirin, Auto Parts, Awnings, Balloons, Ballpoint pens, Bandages, Beach Umbrellas, Boats, Cameras, Candles, Car Battery Cases, Carpets, Caulking, Combs, Cortisones, Cosmetics, Crayons, Credit Cards, Curtains, Deodorants, Detergents, Dice, Disposable Diapers, Dolls, Dyes, Eye Glasses, Electrical Wiring Insulation, Faucet Washers, Fishing Rods, Fishing Line, Fishing Lures, Food Preservatives, Food Packaging, Garden Hose, Glue, Hair Coloring, Hair Curlers, Hand Lotion, Hearing Aids, Heart Valves, Ink, Insect Repellant, Insecticides, Linoleum, Lip Stick, Milk Jugs, Nail Polish, Oil Filters, Panty Hose, Perfume, Petroleum Jelly, Rubber Cement, Rubbing Alcohol, Shampoo, Shaving Cream, Shoes, Toothpaste, Trash Bags, Upholstery, Vitamin Capsules, Water Pipes, Yarn
www.3k88.com...


So we're basically screwed people. Either move out into a cabin out in the middle of nowhere, with no electricity, or you're part of the problem (meaning maybe chill out a little if you like to scream about 'energy' companies and humans that use gasoline).

And worst of all, many of the products made from oil are far worse for the environment than the crude that gets spilled is. For instance, used motor oil is up to several thousands of times worse for the environment than crude is:


Like several individual PAHs, waste crankcase oil has
been shown to be mutagenic and teratogenic [75]. The
results are mixed, but some immunological, reproductive,
fetotoxic, and genotoxic effects have been associated

The concentration of various PAHs is much higher in used
oil than in (fresh) lubricating oil [519]. For example,
Grimmer et al. reported concentrations of dibenz(a,c)-
anthracene, 4-methylpyrene, fluoranthene,
benz(a)anthracene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene,
and benzo(a)pyrene, respectively, 36, 49, 253, 720,
1,112, 4,770, and 7,226 times higher in used compared
to fresh oil
[519].

As an oil used in a crankcase, motor oil breaks down to
give a wide variety of oxygenated and aromatic
hydrocarbons [497]. Other organic compounds found in
waste oil include toluene, benzene, xylenes, and
ethylbenzene. Also present are organic and inorganic
compounds of chlorine, sulphur, phosphorus, bromine,
nitrogen, and metals such as zinc, magnesium, barium, and
lead resulting from oil additives and contamination
during use or disposal [752].

Used engine oil is a contaminant of concern, with large
volumes entering aquatic ecosystems through water runoff.
The major source of petroleum contamination in urbanized
estuaries comes from waste crankcase oil [762]. PAHs,
heavy metals, additives and antioxidants, trace levels of
chlorinated solvents, and PCBs have been detected in used
engine oil [519]. As mentioned above, naphthalene,
benzo(a)pyrene, fluorene, and phenanthrene are common PAH
components of used motor oil [75].
www.nature.nps.gov/hazardssafety/toxic/oilused.pdf

www.abovetopsecret.com...

And the thing is more used motor oil is leaked from automobiles each year than is caused by spills, while most people live near coastal regions. Beyond that, more oil leaks into the oceans naturally than either dripped motor oil or accidental crude oil spills combined:



Nature is built to handle crude oil, while it isn't built to handle varying combinations of oil distillates and synthetic compounds made using oil.

Without plastics we're screwed. Period. But this should be our motivation to not waste plastic.

But we can try to recycle, and buy local made high quality long lasting products. Buying crap Chinese products designed to break in a couple months is a bigger problem that whatever oil spill happens to be in the current headlines. Even better, you can start washing out and reusing all of the vast array of plastic containers we go through in a year, and use them to store food products we grow right outside our door in a garden, meaning we don't have to travel to buy food imported from some other town or nation, which is wrapped in yet more plastic material destined to land in a fill.

[edit on 3-6-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]




posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 02:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
I hate to say it but its hopeless. Even if we found a viable solution to the energy needs of oil we cannot go without its products. It would be like proposing that humans give up computers. The computers we use can't exist without oil, and not even because of the energy we get from it.

As long as this is the reality there will be spills, but the real kicker is that crude oil is nowhere near as bad for the environment as the products we make from it. Oil isn't going away, because even if we replaced the energy needs we'd still need the oil roughly as much anyways. That means that replacing the energy completely would equate to wasting that energy extracted while reaching for its other components.

So before you go trying to scream about oil spills consider that the PC you're using to do it with was made with oil. The radio or TV you first heard about the spill with was '... ... ...'. When TIME magazine puts out a grocery store checkout isle photo journal (and overcharges for it) the glossy inks they used to make it wouldn't be possible without oil. After debating online, the bed you will sleep in was made with oil. If you go and protest oil and get hurt, pretty much everything at the hospital was made with oil. Modern life wouldn't be possible without oil.

Some more things made with oil:

This is a list of some of the products made from oil. Nearly everything in our lives is made from oil, made by machinery and systems dependent on oil, and transported by oil as either gas or diesel fuel.

Ammonia, Anesthetics, Antihistamines, Artificial limbs, Artificial Turf, Antiseptics, Aspirin, Auto Parts, Awnings, Balloons, Ballpoint pens, Bandages, Beach Umbrellas, Boats, Cameras, Candles, Car Battery Cases, Carpets, Caulking, Combs, Cortisones, Cosmetics, Crayons, Credit Cards, Curtains, Deodorants, Detergents, Dice, Disposable Diapers, Dolls, Dyes, Eye Glasses, Electrical Wiring Insulation, Faucet Washers, Fishing Rods, Fishing Line, Fishing Lures, Food Preservatives, Food Packaging, Garden Hose, Glue, Hair Coloring, Hair Curlers, Hand Lotion, Hearing Aids, Heart Valves, Ink, Insect Repellant, Insecticides, Linoleum, Lip Stick, Milk Jugs, Nail Polish, Oil Filters, Panty Hose, Perfume, Petroleum Jelly, Rubber Cement, Rubbing Alcohol, Shampoo, Shaving Cream, Shoes, Toothpaste, Trash Bags, Upholstery, Vitamin Capsules, Water Pipes, Yarn
www.3k88.com...


So we're basically screwed people. Either move out into a cabin out in the middle of nowhere, with no electricity, or you're part of the problem (meaning maybe chill out a little if you like to scream about 'energy' companies and humans that use gasoline).

And worst of all, many of the products made from oil are far worse for the environment than the crude that gets spilled is. For instance, used motor oil is up to several thousands of times worse for the environment than crude is:


Like several individual PAHs, waste crankcase oil has
been shown to be mutagenic and teratogenic [75]. The
results are mixed, but some immunological, reproductive,
fetotoxic, and genotoxic effects have been associated

The concentration of various PAHs is much higher in used
oil than in (fresh) lubricating oil [519]. For example,
Grimmer et al. reported concentrations of dibenz(a,c)-
anthracene, 4-methylpyrene, fluoranthene,
benz(a)anthracene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene,
and benzo(a)pyrene, respectively, 36, 49, 253, 720,
1,112, 4,770, and 7,226 times higher in used compared
to fresh oil
[519].

As an oil used in a crankcase, motor oil breaks down to
give a wide variety of oxygenated and aromatic
hydrocarbons [497]. Other organic compounds found in
waste oil include toluene, benzene, xylenes, and
ethylbenzene. Also present are organic and inorganic
compounds of chlorine, sulphur, phosphorus, bromine,
nitrogen, and metals such as zinc, magnesium, barium, and
lead resulting from oil additives and contamination
during use or disposal [752].

Used engine oil is a contaminant of concern, with large
volumes entering aquatic ecosystems through water runoff.
The major source of petroleum contamination in urbanized
estuaries comes from waste crankcase oil [762]. PAHs,
heavy metals, additives and antioxidants, trace levels of
chlorinated solvents, and PCBs have been detected in used
engine oil [519]. As mentioned above, naphthalene,
benzo(a)pyrene, fluorene, and phenanthrene are common PAH
components of used motor oil [75].
www.nature.nps.gov/hazardssafety/toxic/oilused.pdf

www.abovetopsecret.com...

And the thing is more used motor oil is leaked from automobiles each year than is caused by spills, while most people live near coastal regions. Beyond that, more oil leaks into the oceans naturally than either dripped motor oil or accidental crude oil spills combined:



Nature is built to handle crude oil, while it isn't built to handle varying combinations of oil distillates and synthetic compounds made using oil.

Without plastics we're screwed. Period. But this should be our motivation to not waste plastic.

But we can try to recycle, and buy local made high quality long lasting products. Buying crap Chinese products designed to break in a couple months is a bigger problem that whatever oil spill happens to be in the current headlines. Even better, you can start washing out and reusing all of the vast array of plastic containers we go through in a year, and use them to store food products we grow right outside our door in a garden, meaning we don't have to travel to buy food imported from some other town or nation, which is wrapped in yet more plastic material destined to land in a fill.

[edit on 3-6-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]

How about making those that made with oil from Hemp Oil instead petroleum?

[edit on 3/6/2010 by masonicon]



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 02:25 AM
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Cannabis can replace the oil.
I wonder if the hundred thousand dollar challenge is still going now that Jack Herer has passed on.



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 03:30 AM
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That's basically vegetable oil. you can do other things with the plant besides the oil bearing seeds: such as harvest cotton'esque fibers, and even supposedly some types of polymers.

But what it lacks completely are solvents. Solvents are the key to everything I mentioned. Imagine a world without 'paint thinner', or "Goof Off", or acetone, or xylene.

Those are everyday practical raw distillates of crude. In virtually all of the worlds manufacturing they derive exotic new solvents compounds from these products, that I don't even know much about.

You like 'magic' markers? Or even better: dry erase markers? Guess where they get those solvents.

[edit on 3-6-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 04:03 AM
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Cannabis hemp (industrial hemp - the kind with no THC content) would completely eliminate our dependence on many absurd products that are only necessary because of the corporate circle jerk that is known as Corporate America. Utilizing hemp to it's utmost potential would restore much of our planet's natural resources.

Hemp grows up to 15 feet tall in as little as 60 days; therefore, one can get two to three harvests per year and it contains no lignin so it requires no sodium hydroxide to strip down to pulp and make paper.

Cannabis hemp would produce all of the following productively and economically:

From the bast fibers of the hemp plant we can create a myriad of textiles including apparel, diapers, fabrics, handbags, work clothes, denim that lasts 4 times longer than cotton denim and is softer too, socks, shoes, fine fabrics, twine, rope, nets, canvas (Cannabis got it's name from the Dutch word for canvas because all ship sails prior to nylon were made out of hemp due to salt in sea spray rotting cotton and flax sails), tarps, carpet, and caulking.

From its' hurds, hemp can provide us with animal bedding, mulch, printing paper, fine and specialty papers, newsprint, cardboard and packaging, fiberboard to build Wal-Mart furniture without using trees, insulation, fiberglass, cement, and stucco.

From the cell fluid of cannabis hemp, we can create abrasive chemicals to degrease engines and strip down paint.

From cannabis seeds we can derive granola superior to other forms of granola because cannabis granola is rich in every amino acid required for life including the two that we as humans are unable to bio-synthesize, birdseed (which, hemp seed is still legal for use as a birdseed as long as it is sterilized because birdseed makers in the 1930s told the U.S. Congress that if they took hemp seeds away the songbirds would cease to sing), soap, shampoo, bath gels, and cosmetics.

Further, the seeds can be refined into hemp oil and from that we can produce salad dressing, margarine, oil paint, varnishes, printing inks, solvents, lubricants, putty, and FUEL.

This is to say nothing of THC itself, a chemical that is found naturally in everyone's body. THC has absolutely no toxicity level. Any human being of any age can consume either by eating, by smoking, or by vaporizing any amount of cannabis without toxic side effects. There is no way in the world that cannabis can kill you, period. Well, I guess unless you get caught up in a drug raid and the police take your life.

That said, some pretty fascinating stuff is in the works with regards to THC medications, and prior to the 1930s THC tinctures could be found in all drug stores nationwide.

As far as agricultural benefits, Cannabis has evolved a very sophisticated natural resistance to pests. It suppresses weeds (it is not a weed itself but an herb, technically) because the roots that it produces are MASSIVE and till and dig at the soil, replenishing lost nutrients from previous crop cycles. This is important because corn saps the life out of soil, making it more difficult to rejuvenate year after year.

And as for comparison to productivity, one acre of hemp will produce the same amount of paper as four acres of trees and the trees take 15 years to mature vs three harvests per year with regards to hemp. That is orders of magnitude more paper produced per acre without requiring such toxic chemicals as sodium hydroxide.

Cannabis hemp is three times more productive at producing biomass to be converted into fuels as corn and cannabis produces all that other stuff at the same time. So, one acre of hemp is equal to six acres of corn because corn takes the full growing season to be ready for harvest.



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 04:05 AM
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All you cannabis smokers out there know exactly what I'm talking about, because you know first hand how much energy is contained in a single cannabis seed being that when they're burned they explode fairly violently! Besides, an all corn powered car is impossible to make due to the fact that corn refines into ethyl alcohol and that draws moisture, which is why 100% alcohol does not exist in any environment that includes H2O in any form. Moisture in your gas tank drawn in by the presence of 10% ethyl alcohol fuel additive causes your car's engine to degrade slowly over time while at the same time reducing it's fuel efficiency a little bit at a time.

Oh, and one more thing, Cannabis hemp can readily absorb massive quantities of crude oil if one were to dump large quantities of the bast fiber into some place like, oh, I don't know, the Gulf of Mexico.

Seriously, Corexit 9500 cannot compare to the power of hemp in cleaning up oil spills, especially since Corexit 9500 will be the talk of the town the minute the first cat 3 or 4 blows through!

Here's another interesting thing to keep in mind. Think about the amount of energy that is generated by our fuels vs. the amount of energy that it takes to produce it.

For instance:
Corn ethanol - For every one BTU of energy that you put into the production of the ethanol you will only get 1.5 BTU's out. It's only a .5 BTU increase.

Gasoline (from petroleum) - 1 BTU in equals 9 BTU's out. Sounds pretty good right? Take a look at hemp.

Industrial Hemp - 1 BTU of energy in equals 18 BTU's out. It's about double that of petroleum and hemp is a resource that can be easily produced, cultivated, and delivered without damage to the environment.

Also, one of the really great things about hemp is that it's alive. Dead dinosaurs and other life supposedly reduced to goo under the ocean are not alive.

In the future when we burn hemp to satisfy our growing energy demands, our great hemp fields will breathe carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen, thereby reducing the amount of greenhouse gases as a natural byproduct. Though we may continue to pollute, it will be a drastic difference from using a substance created millions of years ago from creature and plant-life remains that no longer participate in our ecosystem in any meaningful way beyond trashing the atmosphere and the environment.

[edit on 6/3/10 by stalphos]



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 07:12 AM
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we CAN get off the oil and we WILL

we must!
what other option is there?
curl up and die?

no.
fossil fuels are not truly natural in their interaction with the environment.
we have ALL that we need without dirty combustibles...we just have to start thinking a new way and put the old ways behind us.

FOREVER

so many ways!

sun
wind
water
earth's inner fire (geothermal)
plants
chemistry and physics

all require determination
but we have that, too.




posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 07:50 AM
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reply to post by stalphos
 


GREAT POSTS Stalphos! I couldn't have said it better if I had sat at my computer all day Long! I just wanted to add that the Hemp plant, because of its incredible root system which you mentioned, would do one helluva job against soil erosion and could become a HUGE cash crop all over the world.
Wasn't the first Model T Ford powered by a Hemp Fuel engine?



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 08:00 AM
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reply to post by queenannie38
 


I agree with you on some points but think that instead of thinking of new ways, we should go back to the old ways, BEFORE fossil fuels, Hemp is the answer, the only answer, to feed the planet, to heal the planet, to drive the planet.
Hemp was banned/made illegal because of big industry/chemicos. We all know the names of the companies and the people behind the companies. They forced legislation through banning a natural product because why? Because they couldn't make as much out of it as they could out of fossil fuels and artificial everythings! It all, once again, is due to money/taxes!
People everywhere should just start planting Hemp!



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by wiser3
 


hemp is definitely included in "plants" on my list!
hemp is awesome!
this country was a great deal founded and financed on hemp production and use...but of course you know that.


damn that DuPont latex paint, anyway!


bamboo is another wonder-plant, too.



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by queenannie38
 


Hehe!
Of course! Bamboo, how could I have forgotten!

Latex Paint! Is that like a paint on condom? Just joking! Need a smile every now and then these days!



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by queenannie38
 


This isn't just about energy. It's about everything else that the sigma of which equals modern life. Unless you're ready to give up computers, gadgets, high quality inks and photos, film, TV... and so on.

Then there's durable oil paints, but even more importantly copolymers: epoxies and high grade 2 part paints and adhesives, which 'cure' chemically rather than dry via evaporation of solvents. They use epoxy paints to paint the inside of nuclear reactor cores and everything else. Gen IV nuke plants could solve the energy issue with 99% efficiency opposed to the ONE to TWO percent efficiency nuke plants have today. But we'd still need oil products just to build them.

And then there's mass-scale food preservation...

You mention chemistry but the chemistry revolution was 'fueled' by oil derivatives.

[edit on 3-6-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by stalphos
 


The Emperor Wears No Clothes! Perhaps one of my favorites books of all time. Wish I still had it.

There's only one problem with trying to replace everything with hemp: FOOD.

The environmentalists pushes for biofuels has had food prices increase worldwide. That's just the energy part. Consider everything we have in the modern world. It simply wouldn't be possible to replace everything that oil derivatives gives us, and still have enough food to go around, assuming hemp could replace everything oil gives us.

You do bring up a good point though: Hemp should be replacing ALL paper and toilet paper. That douche Sheryl Crow grandstanded about everyone should only be allowed to use ONE SQUARE of TP, and didn't mention a word about hemp. First and foremost to any environmentalism screaming should be this. If an environmentalist doesn't make this a top priority in their concerns then I don't even believe they actually care about the environment, and instead are just the sorts who want everyone dead and use environmentalist concepts to guilt trip everyone. (I've yet to ever see Al Gore say anything about hemp anything).

Similar could be said of cotton, but cotton is a crop that grows fast enough that the world isn't going to end if we keep using it. But clear cutting trees for paper is devastating, especially when people are going to take paper for granted as if it were made from hemp.


For instance:
Corn ethanol - For every one BTU of energy that you put into the production of the ethanol you will only get 1.5 BTU's out. It's only a .5 BTU increase.

Gasoline (from petroleum) - 1 BTU in equals 9 BTU's out. Sounds pretty good right? Take a look at hemp.

Industrial Hemp - 1 BTU of energy in equals 18 BTU's out. It's about double that of petroleum and hemp is a resource that can be easily produced, cultivated, and delivered without damage to the environment.


Do you have citations for that? My research into biodiesel has shown vastly lower ratios than this, and I've researched basically all of the major seed crops used globally to produce it. I've not seen anything anywhere near what you're saying not even from larger easier to harvest and clean seed crops.

Im really glad you brought hemp up tho. I hardly every see environmentalists make a big fuss about bringing in a hemp economy.

If the criminal industrialists hadn't banned hemp the world would be a better place, but we'd still be using oil derivatives to have our modern world.

[edit on 3-6-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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what percentage do you think we could cut our oil dependence by if we utilized the cannabis to its fullest extent with our best abilities and brightest minds?

I imagine it would be staggering...

the gov did ask us people to send in our greatest concerns and questions and had to reset the count i think 4 times cause it kept coming up cannabis



posted on Jun, 3 2010 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by system.robot
 


I can't sure with too much certainty.

I'm hoping you guys can link in lots of data about it. I'm behind on studies and projections for the past many years.

The resinous "tars" you get from 'marijuana' could even offer more unique solutions.

The biggest things we CANT get from it is the various solvents. They can't be replaced by anything I've ever been made aware of.

However, that doesn't mean we can't do better with our impacts.

But to get to the info your desire you have to figure it 2 ways: How much improvemnts can we get from (1) the seeds and (2) the fibers. THen this has to be factored against how much land can we make use of considering food crops.

Since I've been researching biofuel lately, the amount of biofuel you can get per acre of crops has to be established, but I haven't noticed hemp in any of the lists. The advantage you get from hemp is you also get the fiber content that I don't think you get from other biofuels. But then if all of the seeds go to biofuel you're now limited to those uses.

Regardless we could do much better with hemp.

You could do ballpark estimates of if we replaced mostly all cotton croplands with hemp. Then there are factors such as croplands devoted to trees that get replanted that could instead be converted to hemp, which also provides useful seeds that trees don't. But you have to factor that against how much replanting of trees would be acceptable for these purposes.

I'm not an expert on the matter, I'm only good for pondering some of the angles.



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


Well there is a new way to eliminate to eliminate most forms of plastic commonly used today, which consumes 10% of our oil here in the U S, and the new product is biodegradable. I posted a thread about it here;, although it did not receive many replies, the ones that did were positive.

I think it's time that we start supporting these kinds of ideas, to help wean us off of oil consumption, even if it's as "simple" as eliminating plastic as now produced.

The thread is located here:

"PROGANIC(R) is the "2010 Biomaterial of the Year!"


www.abovetopsecret.com...



[edit on 4-6-2010 by manta78]



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


You need to do more research. We can easily get off oil and do all the things we do now and more. Ethanol, bio diesel, and hemp can easily replace most things oil does and do it cleaner and are renewable. Henry Ford made a car body out of Hemp that was stronger then metal. He also designed the model A to run on ethanol. But Dupont and the Rockefeller's used thier political connectedness to quash those markets by outlawing them. That's what prohibition was all about, it was about about Standard oil eliminating its competition with a clean renewable fuel not about the evils of drinking alcohol. Same thing with Hemp and the reefer madness fear inducing propaganda etc. which led to it being outlawed! It was all protecting markets for the politically connected.

There are all kinds of solvents in nature and like ethanol, wood alcohol, turpentine, mineral spirits to name a few.



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 12:52 AM
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do you think the scarcity of numbers has anything to do with the ban on research in the usa or the refusal to issue permits to researchers and universities

ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS OF HEMP

* Hemp grown for the production of biomass fuels can provide all of our gas, oil and coal energy needs and end dependency on fossil fuels.
* Hemp results in a 95.5% fuel-to-feed ratio when used for pyrolysis the thermochemical process that converts organic matter into fuel.
* Biomass has heating value of up to 8,000 BTU/lb., with virtually no residual sulphur or ash during combustion.
* Biomass fuels offer a clean alternative to fossil fuels. No sulphur oxides are released, either during pyrolysis or combustion. A closed CO2 system is created. According to Stanley Manahan, «Environmental Chemistry », biomass fuels would not result in any net CO2 being added to the atmosphere.
* Hemp is the #1 producer of biomass per acre in the world. Biomass energy expert Lynn Osburn estimates that 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 million acres of hemp would replace all of Canada's fossil fuel demands.
* From 75°/O to 90% of all paper was made with hemp fiber until the late 1800's.
* U.S.D.A. bulletin #404 outlined a process for the production of paper using pulp and demonstrated that hemp could replace 40% to 70% of all tree pulp paper, including corrugated boxes, computer paper and paper bag.
* An acre of hemp will produce as much pulp for paper as 4,1 acres of trees over a 20 year period.
* The hemp paper-making process requires no dioxin-producing chlorine bleach and uses 75% to 85% less sulphur-based acid.
* Hemp paper is suitable for recycle use 7 to 8 times, compared with 3 times for wood pulp paper.
* By utilizing hemp pulp for paper, we could stop the deforestation of our country and produce stronger, more environmentally sound paper for less than 3/: of the price of wood pulp paper. The paper mills now in place would need almost no conversion in order to switch from wood to hemp pulp.
* Hemp produces the strongest, most durable natural soft-fiber on earth. Until the 1 820's, up to 80% of all textiles and fabrics for clothes, canvas, linens and cordage were made principally from hemp.

SOURCE



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 01:01 AM
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theres all kinds of info out there it just needs to be brought to light
theres got to be some major cannabis conspiracy going on

source

Hemp seed oil for BioDiesel

Production of oil

Grown for oilseed, Canadian grower's yields average 1 tonne/hectare, or about 400 lbs. per acre. Cannabis seed contains about 28% oil (112 lbs.), or about 15 gallons per acre. Production costs using these figures would be about $35 per gallon. Some varieties are reported to yield as much as 38% oil, and a record 2,000 lbs. per acre was recorded in 1999. At that rate, 760 lbs.of oil per acre would result in about 100 gallons of oil, with production costs totaling about $5.20 gallon......................

Production of Bio-Diesel

Basically methyl esters, or biodiesel, as it is commonly called, can be made from any oil or fat, including hemp seed oil. The reaction requires only oil, an alcohol (usually methanol) and a catalyst (usually sodium hydroxide [NaOH, or drain cleaner]). The reaction produces only biodiesel and a smaller amount of glycerol or glycerin.

The costs of materials needed for the reaction are the costs associated with production of hemp seed oil, the cost of methanol and the NaOH. In the instances where waste vegetable oil, or WVO, is used, the cost for oil is of course, free. Typically methanol costs about $2 per gallon and NaOH costs about $5 per 500g or about $0.01 per gram...............

Hemp Cellulose for Ethanol

Another approach will involve conversion of cellulose to ethanol, which can be done in several ways including gasification, acid hydrolysis and a technology utilizing engineered enzymes to convert cellulose to glucose, which is then fermented to make alcohol. Still another approach using enzymes will convert cellulose directly to alcohol, which leads to substantial process cost savings..................



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 02:55 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


I got my copy Of "The Emperor wears no clothes" from Amazon.
Hope I am allowed to say this here!
Jack Herrer was the King of Hemp!



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