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Japan's Moon Base Plans

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posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 07:40 AM
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Japan's Moon Base Plans




JAXA, the Japanese space agency has announced it has plans to build the first functional Lunar base by the year 2020. The moon base has been a dream of science fiction writers for decades now, but Japan says no humans will be at this research lab. The humanoid robots designed in Japan are some of the most cutting edge advanced on the market today. And yet even these will be dwarfed in ability by what is projected to come in the next ten years. Power systems, articulation, and information processing will allow the robots of the future to be more capable in their environments, require less information to function, and have more advanced automated systems to help them take care of emergency situations should they lose contact with Earth for moments or even days.



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My Comments
I would have much preffered it to be manned like the Iss but i suppose robots are just as good. Especially if they help us get into space and every man-made object in space or on a planet or moon is one step closer to our civilizations main goal.




posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 07:44 AM
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good for them but i just still find it extremely odd that there hasnt been a lunar mission since the original..

and going through some posts on ATS, there are lights, etc...its interesting, i hope someome visits again soon so we can make sure its not made out of cheeze



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 07:46 AM
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This is the sensible way to do it. Let the robots take the risk while building shelters for humans - to follow later.


This also produces a great spin-off technology for everyone else - cheap (mass-produced) humanoid robot servants.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 07:53 AM
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Use robots and automation to build the base (or at least prep the area), then later on humans can come and finish the job/use it.

Robots can also perform all the rock collecting for experiments, accurately map the local area, and even do some of the experiments themselves.

The Japanese are on the right track with this.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by Pixus
 


Japanese
haha well i have to say that japan and china have always been leading on the technology front these days. i admire them in a way .



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by Pixus
 



Use robots and automation to build the base (or at least prep the area), then later on humans can come and finish the job/use it.


I would say the robots should be used to build the station to completion. After the station is fully stocked with consumable supplies and holds a breathable atmosphere... then send a few humans to it - but not before. Why risk the effects of a punctured spacesuit, while involved in construction, when it's not necessary?



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by Larryman
 


And we got the guys to do it they are way more advanced in the robotic department :p i think 2020 is a very reasonable goal



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:28 AM
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this is not such big news compared to the fact that the russians plan to have a nuclear space station on mars by 2030! but it's not really that feasable a plan in my own humble oppinion. i would say the more likely date is 2050 before we have anything built on mars, but im sure building something on the moon is more than possible, given the fact that we could've started building up there years ago.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


We will be on mars by 2100 most definetely, were taking small steps and people cant expect miracles.

Unless we come across some major technology that gives us the capability to move on faster then 2100 is when it should happen by.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


We did not have humanoid robots 'years ago' - to take the risks, and use tools designed for human use.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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Originally posted by Larryman
reply to post by Dr Slim
 


We did not have humanoid robots 'years ago' - to take the risks, and use tools designed for human use.


that's because "years ago" there would have just been a ship full of scientists and builders on their way up there.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:36 AM
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Actually I find it kinda disappointing to have the moon so relatively close to us and not have bases and stuff over there already. We should even have a couple of research posts on Mars. :/



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by Slih_09
 


Yes we should but we havent so thiers 2 explanations for that.

1)were just not advanced enough yet to build bases on planets or moons
2)were not being allowed to build bases up thier by the goverment(for unknown reasons)



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


But we are discussing the building of a Moon station, not a graveyard.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by Larryman
 


i'm not suggesting that they would have survived, but what i'm saying is that we are discussing the building of a moon station and NOT what would be building it, whether it be humans or robots, i was just saying the fact of the matter is that in the past we could have already started building, or taking the baby steps, maybe if we had sent a team up there and some had died, then the advancement of robots to do their job would have been developed quicker and we would now have moon stations.
(i'm not saying it's ok for people to die for a moon station, just that robots wouldn't have been thought of years ago)

and just a quick question, who lays claim to the moon?



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


For all we know the moon might be owned by someone.

Look at it this way i have a garden and in my garden i have a ball which i never use or touch, but that doesnt change the fact that its still belongs to me.



[edit on 1-6-2010 by True-seer]



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by True-seer
 


i thought a country would have an official claim to the moon, then again, claiming things could be a dangerous thing for humankind.
i'm not saying there is intelligent life out there, but if there is, and we claim their land, we may be in trouble.
for example if a thief comes into your garden and claims ownership of your ball, do you just give it to him? now magnify that by 6,000,000,000 thieves claiming your whole house and garden, and everything inside it, if you have the power to do something, do you use it?



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by Larryman
I would say the robots should be used to build the station to completion. After the station is fully stocked with consumable supplies and holds a breathable atmosphere... then send a few humans to it - but not before. Why risk the effects of a punctured spacesuit, while involved in construction, when it's not necessary?


It just depends on how advanced our robots are today, or will be in the next couple of decades. For all we know, it may simply be impossible (or extremely difficult/costly) for robots to build an entire air-tight structure in that environment, in any reasonable amount of time.

I agree with you though, the less risk we expose our astronauts to, the better.

[edit on 1-6-2010 by Pixus]



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


actually i'd let them have it i dont own much and my house sucks


but i do see were your coming from.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Pixus

Originally posted by Larryman
I would say the robots should be used to build the station to completion. After the station is fully stocked with consumable supplies and holds a breathable atmosphere... then send a few humans to it - but not before. Why risk the effects of a punctured spacesuit, while involved in construction, when it's not necessary?


It just depends on how advanced our robots are today, or will be in the next couple of decades. For all we know, it may simply be IMPOSSIBLE (or extremely difficult/costly) for robots to build an entire air-tight structure in that environment, in any reasonable amount of time.

I agree with you though, the less risk we expose our astronauts to, the better.

[edit on 1-6-2010 by Pixus]


nothing is impossible. but it is quite difficult, but i can still think of a lot of things more difficult to do than that. just to throw something into the mix, if we can build stations on the moon/mars/wherever, how come we don't build them under water? surely it would be a start?



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