COREXIT Rain in Montreal?

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posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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Here near Sherbrooke it's raining and it's very humid, but I don't see anything particular :\

And if something happens weird in Montreal, my dad will tell me AH!



Peace, I'll post if I see anything special...

EDIT: Maybe it's because of the smoke from the recent fires?
Just a tought, because yesterday the smell was so discusting and the smoke irritating... :\

[edit on 1-6-2010 by jolois]




posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by St-Patrick
 


Family freaked out when we saw the moon. I told them it was smoke from all the fires around us.
When I tried to take a picture, it reverted to normal, so the moon is slightly orange on pics...



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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I read this somewhere, can't find the source now.
Dish detergent contains an extra ingredient to make the bubbles. Corexit does not contain this ingredient.

Think about it... if it did... the gulf would look like a giant bubble bath.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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This is weird because today i smelt soap while waiting for the bus. It could be a coincidence, but you never know.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by Aresh Troxit
reply to post by St-Patrick
 


Family freaked out when we saw the moon. I told them it was smoke from all the fires around us.
When I tried to take a picture, it reverted to normal, so the moon is slightly orange on pics...



Yes It did the same to me here. I took a picture of the red moon and it showed up normal. I wonder what's really makes it look reddish.



posted on Jun, 2 2010 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by St-Patrick
 



There has been a number of forest fires lately due to the dry conditions, that is the most likely reason for seeing a red moon.

www.universetoday.com...

There are few situations that can cause a red moon. The most common way to see the Moon turn red is when the Moon is low in the sky, just after moonrise or before it's about to set below the horizon. Just like the Sun, light from the Moon has to pass through a larger amount of atmosphere when it's down near the horizon, compared to when it's overhead. The Earth's atmosphere can scatter sunlight, and since moonlight is just scattered sunlight, it can scatter that too. Red light can pass through the atmosphere and not get scattered much, while light at the blue end of the spectrum is more easily scattered. When you see a red moon, you're seeing the red light that wasn't scattered, but the blue and green light have been scattered away. That's why the Moon looks red. The second reason for a red moon is if there's some kind of particle in the air. A forest fire or volcanic eruption can fill the air with tiny particles that partially obscure light from the Sun and Moon. Once again, these particles tend to scatter blue and green light away, while permitting red light to pass through more easily. When you see a red moon, high up in the sky, it's probably because there's a large amount of dust in the air.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 12:11 PM
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Hmmm... now I want to see Reuturn of The Living Dead.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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Cental Arkansas here.

We just had 2 days of rain in a system that seemed to come out of the Gulf, I noticed nothing at all out of the way with the water.

More rain is expected throughout the next few days and I'll continue to look out for anything odd.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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Moon photography-

Most people shoot the moon with their camera on Auto. Come to think of it, most people shoot everything with their camera on Auto. The predominate color in the scene when shooting an image of the moon at night is black. The camera sensor "sees" this and adjusts so that the exposure is an "average" of the scene. The end result is a grossly over exposed shot. The color of the moon will essentially be white.

When I shoot the moon I typically use either a 600mm lens or an 800mm lens. In either case I set the camera to manual. Adjust f stop to 4 or 5.6 depending on the lens (wide open). Shutter setting is usually 1/125s - 1/250s. ISO is 200 - 400. Using the camera's meter I adjust the shutter speed until the meter indicates 2 to 2.5 stops of under exposure (that's a lot). The resulting image yields a black sky and a properly exposed moon. These settings work for the lenses that I listed. Shorter focal lengths will require different settings.

Do it right and you might get something like this-







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