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German president quits over military remarks

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posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:30 PM
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German president quits over military remarks


hosted.ap.org

BERLIN (AP) -- President Horst Koehler stunned Germans by resigning Monday after being criticized for appearing to link military deployments abroad with the country's economic interests - creating a new headache for Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The resignation, effective immediately, came a year into Koehler's second term as the largely ceremonial head of state. Merkel's center-right alliance installed the former International Monetary Fund boss as president in 2004, and his departure is a symbolic blow.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:30 PM
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Military deployments linked with economic interests... sure. Could there be another bigger issue they are not disclosing?

Could this have something to do with the EU?

In the article it states that he resigned over his comments. Really? How often do politicians walk away from their career like this? The U.S. president comes under fire for almost everything they do or say. Something smells fishy here.

hosted.ap.org
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Darn you beat me to it. I checked before I posted mine, I guess we were only about 1 minute apart. Anyway...


Let's make this a domino effect. The next leader to say something true and stupid like this should resign or be forced out. Clean up the global house.

Germans deserve better, but sadly their alternative(Social Democrats) aren't much better than the Christian Democrats.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Can the EU survive?

More news today about the EU. May be relevant.





The fateful decision to make the EU effectively a halfway house - tying its member countries into a joint currency and interest rate decisions, while allowing them to retain control over national budgets and taxes - has left the fractured grouping at a crossroads.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by onequestion
Can the EU survive?

More news today about the EU. May be relevant.





The fateful decision to make the EU effectively a halfway house - tying its member countries into a joint currency and interest rate decisions, while allowing them to retain control over national budgets and taxes - has left the fractured grouping at a crossroads.


What it is beginning to sound like to me is that the people at the top of the EU want it to become a Federal government, no longer a union. Like a multispeed Europe.

I think they have reached the point where they either become federal or they dissolve.

[edit on 5/31/10 by Misoir]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:42 PM
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Interesting...especially in light of the possibility that the Bush administration may just have set the bar for military action from economic motivations.

Interesting indeed...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:58 PM
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But are there provisions for members countries to leave the EU? Could a country freely leave? Would there be animosity from those that left? Retaliatory embargoes? Would there be war as a result?

As for the German president resigning...I think that there may be far more to the story than just regret over previous remarks. I have a feeling that he is resigning to avoid something. Time will tell, I suppose.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by Ahabstar
 


Its highly hypothetical, but it may be possible. The point is that there is no party in no country who has that on its agenda. And if you are for leaving the EU you are usally called a rightwing backwards idiot. So while the EU itself is very unpopular. Saying something is even more unpopular because you will be rediculed by the media.

[edit on 31-5-2010 by kybertech]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 



Military deployments linked with economic interests... sure.

His comments regarding the economy/war actually had nothing to do with the war in Afghanistan; the Green Party here in Germany twisted what he said to make it seem that way. He more or less said that sometimes you have to fight battles to protect economic interests. When he said this, last year, he was referring to the whole pirate thing. Basically, he was saying that if Germany's economic interests are threatened by the pirates, the Bundeswehr should be ready to fight.


The U.S. president comes under fire for almost everything they do or say.

The US presidency is a political position though; being the Bundespräsident is a largely ceremonial one (the German president isn't even in a political party!). On top of that, there is sort of an unwritten rule that the Bundespräsident isn't supposed to be criticized (at least to the degree that he was being).

It seems that he more or less bowed out to save some of honor and esteem for the office.

I will concede though that there may be something more that we don't know. I'll admit that the same thing crossed my mind when I heard this this afternoon.

I guess we'll just have to wait and see.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by Ahabstar
 



But are there provisions for members countries to leave the EU? Could a country freely leave? Would there be animosity from those that left? Retaliatory embargoes? Would there be war as a result?

There are no provisions that I'm aware of. I think this is due to the notion that when the EU formed it was to be a permanent thing; kinda like the Union in the US—the Constitution doesn't tell us the procedure for a state leaving the Union. That said, I guess a country could theoretically leave. I couldn't say much more as to what would happen after that. I don't think there would be animosity, much less war, if a country just left the EU. I mean, it's not really that strong. I could see there being some smaller countries getting upset though if, say, Germany dropped the euro and picked up the Deutsche Mark again because many of the euro nations have benefited from having a common currency with Germany, which is largest economy in Europe.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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Koehler positioned himself as an outsider to the political elite and long enjoyed high popularity ratings. He occasionally refused to sign bills into law due to constitutional concerns and didn't always make himself popular with the government. Last year, he described financial markets as a "monster" that hadn't yet been tamed.


Sounds to me like he didn't want to become a scapegoat. I could be wrong, and if I am I hope Germans here will correct me, but I was under the impression that he was very well liked by the people of Germany. If he did do it to avoid being a scapegoat for something, then I say more power to him!



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by Misoir
Let's make this a domino effect. The next leader to say something true and stupid like this should resign or be forced out. Clean up the global house.


What so stupid about wanting to deploy the military to protect trade routes with anti-piracy patrols off the coast of Somalia?

Not all leaders are bad, ya know??



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 



I was under the impression that he was very well liked by the people of Germany.

Indeed, he was. He had something like an 80 or 90 percent approval rating from the people. Of course, that may stem from the role of president in Germany being largely ceremonial.


If he did do it to avoid being a scapegoat for something, then I say more power to him!

I really couldn't see him doing them to avoid being a scapegoat. As I said, the role is largely ceremonial, not political, and as such, if someone tried to pin something on him, I think the public would see through it. Blaming the Bundespräsident would be like trying to blame the Sergeant at Arms for something that the president of the United States did.

The Chancellor would definitely get thwacked if something happened since she's the one that wields the most political influence in Germany.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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An earlier thread discusses this topic
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Closed.




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