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Sahara cave may hold clues to dawn of Egypt

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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Sahara cave may hold clues to dawn of Egypt




CAIRO (Reuters) - Archaeologists are studying prehistoric rock drawings discovered in a remote cave in 2002, including dancing figures and strange headless beasts, as they seek new clues about the rise of Egyptian civilisation.



Rudolph Kuper, a German archaeologist, said the detail depicted in the "Cave of the Beasts" indicate the site is at least 8,000 years old, likely the work of hunter-gatherers whose descendants may have been among the early settlers of the then-swampy and inhospitable Nile Valley.


Too little if known of prehistoric movement of peoples in and around Egypt and the rest of Africa, I love it when they make little discoveries like this, preserved for 8,000 years, that can add invaluably to our history.

Maybe this discovery and this recent study, "Genetic Data Added to Archaeology and Linguistics to Get Picture of African Population History" will really open up the earliest ages of Egypt.




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Great find. I see it said there were images of "headless beasts." I wonder of what import that was to them. It made me think of this series of depictions in Egypt in which a man is shown, then an animal, and then a man with that animal's head. I was thinking maybe it was related to that, but the Egyptian one was a bird. Maybe there were bigger birds back then, but I figure maybe the Egyptians wore the heads of dead animals during ceremonies or something to show their status. It sounds gross, but today's society wears plenty varieties of exotic furs. People of course also mount animals and there exist polar bear floor coverings with a part of the head still attached.

Maybe they'll release more pictures eventually.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 10:59 PM
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Thanks for the link. It would be amazing to see these people and how their daily lives were.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:04 PM
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I remembering hearing about a mini stone henge that was 8000 years old in southern Egypt, during an episode of Ancient Aliens.

[edit on 30/5/10 by SkyMarshall]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:44 AM
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Nice catch BM!


The cave appears to date back to the tail end of Egypt's green period...during the neolithic. Back then, monsoons came up from central Africa and created lakes. This inevitably led to an increase in wildlife (dinner!) that enabled various cultures to stay in one place for longer periods instead of following the migrations of animals...semi-nomads. They could grow grasses and develop more complex beliefs.

This is a point in time where scholars see the formation of bull worship, as 'food on the hoof' became a necessity and a sign of status. Cattle where kept for their meat, milk was indigestible, they tapped their cattle and drank the blood...nasty!

Round about the same period, much further East, Nabta Playa was about to be created with it's ceremonial focus on the points of the compass and the motion of the Sun. It seems Egypt had a number of diverse cultures slowly being drawn towards creating settlements. As the climate changed and water became a scarce resource, they gathered around deep wells and Nile tributaries. Early population centres began to grow from there.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:25 PM
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i actually found a video about those paintings... at least i believe they are the same. quite interesting.
heritage-key.com...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by darkspace
 
Very, very nice find there darkspace


You're right, it's the same location and becomes more interesting to see the images on film. Here's the video...



I was further impressed by the paintings as they show the traditional technique of blowing colours against the artist's hand. These hand outlines are found all over Africa, Europe and Australia. I like to think of them as 'markers' or 'tags' by individuals. Drawing figures and animals took some artistic ability, but leaving a 'calling card' hand print was child's play.

The portrayal of giraffes made me smile as my favourite Saharan petroglyph indicates the importance of giraffes to Saharan cultures. They may well have been domesticated...the critter has a leash through its nose...




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


i haven't been able to watch the video yet myself because of severe buffering. but i plan to do so a little later ,since this topic is related to one other thread i posted a couple of days ago.

is the dating actually accurate? 8000 years seems a little low for these cave-paintings. would have thought they would be older when one thinks about the history of the region.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by darkspace
 
The video's great if you ignore the BS intro. 'Driest place on Earth' isn't the Sahara, it's the Antarctic or Atacama in Chile.

Other than that, I'm glad you linked it.


Until you can watch the vid, these links are useful...Green Sahara and Neolithic Egypt.



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