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The Last 50 Years of Space Exploration on One Map

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:02 PM
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Hey ATS, I found a map of space exploration over the past 50 years and thought it might be worth sharing. follow the links at the bottom of the post to view the map in it's full size.




Space exploration has gone a very long way in a relatively short amount of time. Just 50 years ago, space missions were all about unknown factors and figuring out what would work. Now we’ve got rocket science down to, well, a science, and space missions are more routine. Have you ever wondered what all of the missions of the last 50 years were about? National Geographic created a map of all of them, showing how often we’ve visited (or attempted to visit) our interstellar neighbors.







Most space missions have been to our nearest neighbors, but some have attempted to explore the great wide open. In fact, New Horizons is still out there, headed toward Pluto. Seeing all of the missions gathered in one place gives a great deal of visual impact and reminds us that, even though NASA launches aren’t as closely watched by the entire world as they once were, space agencies around the world are still working toward understanding our Universe a little better.

gajitz.com...

Check out the full-size map here.
www.flickr.com...

National Geographic zoomable map here.
books.nationalgeographic.com...




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:28 PM
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There is at least one missing.

It's halve way to Pluto right know. It should be in there.

Anyway... S & F



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
There is at least one missing.

It's halve way to Pluto right know. It should be in there.

Anyway... S & F


Isn't that New Horizons? It is mentioned on the picture.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by purplemonkey
 


Really ? I must have missed it ???

Edit. Below in the picture. But there is no line drawn for it. ( yet )

[edit on 5/30/2010 by Sinter Klaas]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 07:28 AM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
reply to post by purplemonkey
 


Really ? I must have missed it ???

Edit. Below in the picture. But there is no line drawn for it. ( yet )

[edit on 5/30/2010 by Sinter Klaas]


yes there is, look near mars, It's the closest long line, there is a set of 3, it's a greenish colour.

Pretty impressive really, what man has been able to accomplish in only the last 50ish years.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 07:36 AM
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It is impressive, didn't even know about half of them, I'm stunned how far technology has brought us, voyager 1 already 10 billion miles away? WOW


Speechless....



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by purplemonkey
 


Bloody [swear=on][/swear].

I must be going blind cause I really didn't see it.


Thanks



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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Well done; Beautiful


S & F



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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Pretty sweet. It would be cooler though if all that were manned missions. Now that would be amazing.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:31 PM
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I see the outer planets have rings.
Why doesn't the earth have rings if 3,500 years ago or in other
cosmic encounters told by Velikovsky when rocks and material
rained down from comets or other close encounters.

There is nothing around the earth's equatorial space.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 08:28 PM
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I'm really suprised to see that there have been more missions to Venus than to Mars. Think about all the pictures and data we have from Mars, now think about how many pictures you've seen of Venus. Infact I only know of a hand full of images taken by Russian probes from the surface of Venus. So where is all this data on Venus?

I'd love to see a list of the names of the missions/probes. Am I missing something or are they not listed.


jra

posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:12 PM
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Originally posted by fieryjaguarpaw
I'm really suprised to see that there have been more missions to Venus than to Mars. Think about all the pictures and data we have from Mars, now think about how many pictures you've seen of Venus. Infact I only know of a hand full of images taken by Russian probes from the surface of Venus. So where is all this data on Venus?


Well Venus and Mars are two very different planets with very different conditions as I'm sure you're aware of. The majority of the missions were Russian and over half of those failed. Plus, information from Russian space exploration is a lot harder to come by.


I'd love to see a list of the names of the missions/probes. Am I missing something or are they not listed.


Here's the list: en.wikipedia.org...



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