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Oil Complicates Forecasts On Hurricane Season Eve

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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Oil Complicates Forecasts On Hurricane Season Eve


www.newsmax.com

As hurricane season approaches, the giant oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is taking weather forecasters into nearly uncharted waters.

The Gulf is a superhighway for hurricanes that form or explode over pools of hot water, then usually move north or west toward the coast. It's now the site of the worst oil spill in U.S. history and along the general path of some of the worst storms ever recorded, including Hurricane Camille, which wiped out the Mississippi coast in 1969, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The season officially starts Tuesday, and although scientists seem to agree that the sp
(visit the link for the full news article)



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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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Could we even imagine how much worse this situation will become if... or better yet when a hurricane slams through the oil rich waters of the gulf? It would literally take an act of god to spare the Gulf of Mexico from a hurricane this year or possibly even next year.

Scientists seem to agree that this oil spill is unlikely to spawn a hurricane but how sure are they? Even still, regardless of whether the oil tainted water spawns the hurricane, it would still complicate the containment and cleanup effort beyond belief.

We are only seeing the beginning of this horrible crisis. There are still many things that could make this spill much worse than we could have ever imagined. Just picture oil contaminated water raining down on the land, ruining farms and spoiling drinking water. Just think of the mixing and churning that a hurricane would do in the water.

--airspoon


www.newsmax.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 30-5-2010 by airspoon]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:48 PM
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GEE, now storms threaten to push the dead plants and fish around in the area along with more oil. The beaches are going to smell of stench of dead things. I woulden't want to live within 2 to 3 miles of the beaches. The beaches are filling up with dead fish. Even a whale was layed dead on a beach. This is going to be an absolute catastrophy. It's a BIO HAZZARD over there. The smell of DEATH.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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At one point in time I was a meteorology major and I have read many ideas on ways man could possibly weaken or destroy a hurricane. One of those ideas was to put an oily slick on the ocean in front of a storm with the idea that the slick would prevent evaporation of the warm tropical water(latent heat) that is needed to drive the storm system.

NOAA has issued their most aggressive pre-season forecast ever it is probaly a safe bet that the season maybe intense but not likely as active as being predicted. If the season is a flop and especially if the oily gulf is inactive this could give TPTB a reason to praise the slick as a mechanism to prevent or weaken hurricanes. Given NOAAs forecast and the likelyhood that it is an overly agrressive means an average or a slightly above average season can still be used as evidence by the dense that the oil spill caused a less active season.

A link to NOAA's tropical storm modification theories and myths:
www.aoml.noaa.gov...

[edit on 30-5-2010 by jrod]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by jrod
 


This oil slick is so spread out and sporadic, with most of the oil beneath the surface, I doubt that this will stop any hurricanes. If anything, it would seem that the oil that is interspersed in the water, would heat the surrounding waters. Regardless, if a hurricane sweeps through the oil-tainted waters, not only would it stir the contaminates around, but it could also cause a massive environmental disaster inland, wherever the hurricane strikes land.

--airspoon



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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Can You imagine what will happen if it rains oil or oil gets dumped by a hurricane + lighting strikes ? Houses , grass , forest will burn out control .Just a happy thought to keep us warm at night .Even a strike on the gulf spill it self .



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:30 PM
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If the oil catches fire, that would make a new kind of hurricane.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by Ethericplane
 


That would actually be an amazing sight.
2nd line.


--airspoon



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


The worst would be that the hurricane hits the spill location and just sucks up all the water.


But again, who knows. I believe in the power of prayer. What if the hurricane sends all the oil into the air and then disperses it in some random texas desert. I know that's not much better, but still, it is a minor improvement.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by 13th Zodiac
 


GEE, another thought of doom. Lightning sets oil ablaze. More smoke to pollute the atmosphere. What a fire that would be to see from space. THANKS BP. Shove a few more golf balls down the hole. I'm sure the CEO of BP has plenty of that kind of equipment. Don't forget the golf cart.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:44 PM
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NOAA has been totally wrong with their hurricane predictions for the last few years. I guess if you keep predicting an "above average" hurricane season every year you will eventually get it right. Even so, the potential any hurricane to make this oil disaster worse is real. I don't know about oil being "sucked up" into the hurricane, but I'm sure the storm surge and wave action could spread oil everywhere and cover sections of the coast.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by itguysrule
 


Even if oil doesn't get sucked up into the hurricane, the water will be contaminated by the oil and dispersants. It doesn't have to be oil clumps. Wherever that water lands, is going to be contaminated. This includes drinking water, fragile land-based eco-systems and even farms. How much it actually pollutes would be debatable.

I don't see why oil couldn't be sucked into the hurricane since convection rather than evaporation is at play. Regardless, the oil and chemical dispersants would contaminate the water that the hurricane would eventually drop inland. You definitely don't want that water falling on your town.

--airspoon



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


You could very well be right about convection pulling oil up into the hurricane. I was thinking of evaporation which probably could not carry any oil. It's all definitely bad news for any living thing in the area. I just hope the hurricane predictions are as far off as they have been in the past.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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This is Extremely important to read to understand the ingredients of a HYPERCANE....
www.connectamarillo.com...

Hypercane:

Wind speeds in a Category 5 hurricane can reach upwards of 155 mph. Hypercane wind speeds would easily reach 500 mph. Hurricane Katrina was practically an average breezy day in the Panhandle, compared to the strength of the winds in a hypercane.

How might one of these storms come into existence?

“It would have to be a cataclysmic event such as an asteroid or comet strike or something like a super volcanic eruption to get a 122 degree temperature increase.” Said Scott Plischke, a Meteorologist at the National Weather Service.
"Plischke said, “It’s not plausible…theoretically it’s possible, but you would have to have sea surface temperatures of about 122 degrees. Even the worst-case global warming scenarios don’t call for temperatures to rise that much. We’re looking at maybe 3-7 degrees for global warming, but to get sea surface temperatures up to 122 degrees is highly unlikely.”----------------------------

The Coast and much of the central US may be head for disaster. I have heard effects such as oil big pumped up the Mississippi river through undertow currents, this oilslick can hit home even if you are not living near the coast





[edit on 31-5-2010 by KilluminatisRex]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by KilluminatisRex
This is Extremely important to read to understand the ingredients of a HYPERCANE....
www.connectamarillo.com...

Hypercane:

Wind speeds in a Category 5 hurricane can reach upwards of 155 mph. Hypercane wind speeds would easily reach 500 mph. Hurricane Katrina was practically an average breezy day in the Panhandle, compared to the strength of the winds in a hypercane.

How might one of these storms come into existence?

“It would have to be a cataclysmic event such as an asteroid or comet strike or something like a super volcanic eruption to get a 122 degree temperature increase.” Said Scott Plischke, a Meteorologist at the National Weather Service.
"Plischke said, “It’s not plausible…theoretically it’s possible, but you would have to have sea surface temperatures of about 122 degrees. Even the worst-case global warming scenarios don’t call for temperatures to rise that much. We’re looking at maybe 3-7 degrees for global warming, but to get sea surface temperatures up to 122 degrees is highly unlikely.”----------------------------

The Coast and much of the central US may be head for disaster. I have heard effects such as oil big pumped up the Mississippi river through undertow currents, this oilslick can hit home even if you are not living near the coast





[edit on 31-5-2010 by KilluminatisRex]


bumped due to the importance of this. Must I make my own thread? people



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon
reply to post by jrod
 


This oil slick is so spread out and sporadic, with most of the oil beneath the surface, I doubt that this will stop any hurricanes. If anything, it would seem that the oil that is interspersed in the water, would heat the surrounding waters. Regardless, if a hurricane sweeps through the oil-tainted waters, not only would it stir the contaminates around, but it could also cause a massive environmental disaster inland, wherever the hurricane strikes land.

--airspoon


I highly doubt the oil will do anything to hinder hurricanes. My point of the post was to speculate that if this season is a flop or even average, there will be those who may give credit to the oil spill for hindering tropical cyclone development.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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Hurricane Henry helped clean up the Texas Coasts from the 1979 oil spill in the gulf of mexico....

This HAS happened before.....4 storms went through the oiled waters of the Gulf of mexico and there was not "toxic rain" they actually helped clean the oil....

So everyone needs to understand....the oil spill will have no effect on Hurricanes, if any it will stall the hurricances



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by jrod
 


reply to post by Goradd
 




I understand you say that the oil will not effect. HAVE YOU NOT EVEN READ MY POST?????? OIL CAN CAUSE THE WATER TO HEAT UP GIVING THE HYPERCANE ITS REQUIRED HIGH TEMPERATURE TO START. HOW IS OIL NOT GOING EFFECT ANYTHING>?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!??????????

WHY DO PEOPLE POST THEIR OPINION, UNEDUCATED OPINION, WITHOUT EXAMINING ALL THE DETAILS OF OTHER RESPECTED MEMBERS?????

again 122 degress farenheit to disaster! if ocean waters somehow were to raise to 122, this could start a high speed hurricane 5 times strong then hurricane katrina and possibly 5 times as large

sorry if i seem upset about this and I dont mean to yell or be rude. but please understand this is huge and a disaster waiting to happen. Bible prophecy explain cataclysms beyond normal reckoning. Oil will raise the surface temperature to levels above 122 degrees and do you still not think the oil will effect hurricanes this season? Pray all ye faithful,

[edit on 31-5-2010 by KilluminatisRex]

[edit on 31-5-2010 by KilluminatisRex]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by KilluminatisRex
 


I definitely respect your opinion and believe there may be cause for concern over a Hypercane.

However, I can't even fathom the oceans's surface temp reaching 122 degrees. That is the temperature of hot water coming out of your tank!! Almost hot enough to burn to the touch. My opinion is that if the surface temp of seawater in the gulf gets that high, we are going to have much more on our minds, as well as the hypercane.

I pray that there is no way of this happening.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:24 PM
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Sooo....scratch the 122 figure and say it raises the water temperature a mean ten degres beyond normal (whatever that may be)
Im just sayin that whatever the oil does do it is darker than water and perhaps it may heat up better under the sunlight causing patches of the ocean to be warmer than normal...what will it all average out to?
perhaps slighlty stronger than normal or twice as strong as normal or whatever proportion it will average out to...
The question then being does the crude oil indeed make the water warm more efficiently than straight sea water in the sun?
If so, then the rest is simply proportional .....




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