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Mobile phones responsible for disappearance of honey bee

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posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by FritosBBQTwist
 


I can understand you having your doubts, but using your mobile phone with pride!?

Though they may not be killing the bees, we know that there is a whole net of radiation all over our globe thanks to our mobiles, and that is not a good thing. Radiation mutates cells, microwaves, x-rays, UV, Infra-red, whilst they all vary in strength and therefor effects, hopefully people would agree that the less the better, just as a precaution.

Im hoping you were joking to be honest, because too many people seem to have connections with material objects such as phones. For what reason? To be in contact 24hours a day? Whilst we may have better communication than ever these days, the whole population seem to be increasingly isolated, and that is not a good thing whatsoever.




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


I got honey bees by the thosands. I haven't a clue what your babbling about. No shortage on honey bees here. You shouldn't listen to scientists all the time. Here have some fresh HONEY...yeah BEES make it...mmmm..

I grow bees, and there just fine.




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:59 AM
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Originally posted by pause4thought
That doesn't sound like a convincing argument in the light of the extreme scenario that has been at play only in recent years:

Losses have been just as bad before.

For example in 1905 and 1919 90 % of honey bee colonies collapsed on the Island of Wight. In 1910 60 % of colonies were lost in Stawell district of Australia. Large scale losses also occurred in 1915 in Portland, Oregon and from Florida to California. 1917 large scale losses were reported in NJ, NY, Ohio and Canada. These are just a few examples. For a comprehensive list check out Underwood & vanEngelsdorp - Colony Collapse Disorder: Have We Seen This Before?

[edit on 31-5-2010 by rhinoceros]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:33 AM
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Publishing alarming data sounds like a good way to get grant money to me. Research is all about getting the all important, lifestyle supporting grant. I think that the obvious culprit, pesticides, is more likely. If I was a wireless company president I would give them a big grant



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by RMFX1
 



You can't play angry angry birds or dragons lair on a bee hive.

No doubt.
Then again you can't play anything anywhere if you don't eat, and that is what happens when the beehives have no bees in them. No bees means no pollination, which means no food for the gamer, ever.


Game over.


[edit on 5/31/2010 by wayno]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by wayno
 



Then again you can't play anything anywhere if you don't eat, and that is what happens when the beehives have no bees in them. No bees means no pollination, which means no food for the gamer, ever.


This is a falsehood that had been discussed at the beginning of this thread. European bees are an introduced species in North America. In Europe and in North America they are not the only pollinator. A large part of the food supply uses wind to distribute pollen. There were lots of foods available in North America before the European honey bee was introduced.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thought

On the other hand, can you imagine the size of the lobby that will run to the defence of the cell phone industry? It could turn out to be an object lesson in the power of corporate industry vs. the common good.



To be honest, I seriously doubt the cellphone industry will need to lobby. People are absolutely addicted to cell phones. They will fall down and seize in the street in intense withdrawal pains. All production across the country will stop dead in its tracks.

Not having a device that allows you to have this conversation 20 times a day;

"What are you doing?"

"Nothing"

Would be inhumane, absolutely torturous. Screw the honeybees!



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 12:36 PM
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Interesting article.

While I don't doubt that the mass use of cell phones may play a role in the decline of the honey bee, I don't believe that is the only factor. It is more likely a combination of several factors such as cell phones, pesticides, loss of habitat, etc, that is influencing this decline. No matter what the reasons are, they are most likely all due to the effects that humans have on the environment.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 12:45 PM
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Wow! So cell phones created the virus that has decimated honey bees? Now that is breaking news!!!

But I have one question….What wiped out the honey bees in China first long before the cell phone? In China they manually pollinate their fruit trees by hand since the bees died out a long time ago.

Wait! One more question, there are many other bee type bugs and they are doing fne…



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


The 1980's is a "long time ago?"

God I must be ancient.

www.newsweek.com...


When China rapidly expanded its pear orchards in the 1980s, it stepped up its use of pesticides, and this age-old system of pollination began to unravel. Today, during the spring, the snow-white pear blossoms blanket the hills, but there are no bees to carry the pollen. Instead, thousands of villagers climb through the trees, hand-pollinating them by dipping "pollination sticks"—brushes made of chicken feathers and cigarette filters—into plastic bottles of pollen and then touching them to each of the billions of blossoms.


Despite your saying 30 years ago was a "long time ago" I am glad you posted that. I wasnt aware the Chinese were manually pollinating their fruit crops.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:06 PM
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To me this was as obvious as 1 to 2 to 3 to 4 to saturation poor bees means poor US

None of my lot who lives under my roof have mobiles we have 1 mobile for all the house ,which is for emergency only,its switched of with battery taken out,between the councils snooping and crime and the obviouse effects on health, which i noticed as soon as mobile phone towers went up,
Think of the size of the tiny cells on a bee, think about its life span, then think about the bees natural cell regeneration time in its juvenile life,think before it ages and cells dont renew as fast.
I got 2 mobiles in 1999 and sacked em when money air time ran out, i dident feel right around them dang mobiles.then the bees started to decline as more tower,s arrived not just bees loads of bugs scarce now,
so we have 1 small phone and i also got shut of house phone 2 mths back ,if people need me they still come around and knock yes knock and its better face to face to talk have a brew,if we have an emergency ill put battery in and call 999 or doctor.
I,m fed up with all the this tec its going to bite back hard ,just use a normal Ethernet for ya pc ,
Ps Im waiting for my youngest to be forced a home school laptop They will say your child must have one to do homework ,All the time spying on familys in the name of we can ,we might find something juicee or something else like a nosey teacher ,I am thinking how to limit its impact on her life for her future,i dont want her being a msm,chat room freak,loked in her bedroom listening to hip,hop ,midnight chats on facebook, adiction to mind wasteing click games.
all these are bad in my eyes and my misses thinks so aswell.
But hey i can see whats coming it not a nice future health will be bad ,water will be scarce and foul,people with pancreas probs at 25,liver probs,strokes at 30.

[

[edit on 5/31/2010 by dashar]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
There were lots of foods available in North America before the European honey bee was introduced.

Yes, but way back then huge monocultures didn't exist.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by sandwiches
Don't forget the GWEN stations they have planted underground to manipulate earth's magnetic fields.

Oh, and HAARP for the atmosphere.


GWEN's got diddly to do with "manipulating earth's magnetic fields". Neither does HAARP.

Oh, and your living space doesn't have a frequency.

GWEN's nothing more than a long range comm link that doesn't depend on a predictable ionosphere. It uses ground waves (hence the "gw" part) that don't depend on ionospheric reflection. In the event of several types of happenings, the ionosphere's behavior won't be particularly conducive to reliable HF communications, so we designed a ground wave system that doesn't depend on it.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:27 PM
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As someone has been posting, I just read the paper and it's one of those that probably wouldn't have been accepted in a better vetted journal.

The authors' premise is that GSM somehow affects magnetite in a way that keeps the bees from navigaing. However, they never pursue that other than just baldly stating that this is true, while failing to account for a mechanism. The 900MHz frequency range of a GSM phone doesn't really have any significant interaction with magnetite, certainly it doesn't have much with single-domain sized particles of magnetite due to the disparity between the wavelength and the particle size. (Ulrich Warnke not withstanding, he's a moonbat, magnetostriction does not work the way he says)

The experiment has too small a sample size, the resulting p value is crap, the experiment was not blinded, and the authors are not conversant with physics or electronics, nor did they bother getting one for a consultant. I also note that the use of the bogus, non-scholarly term "electrosmog" probably gives you a heads-up as to where the authors are coming from.

I also note from the photos that for the test hives they are simply dropping a couple of phones in there, yet they claim that the phones ran from February to April, and were on only 15 minutes twice a day. Given that the authors don't seem to be that technically apt, I'll assume that this means they were opening the hives four times a day during the peak foraging times to turn the phones on and off, and removing and replacing them.

They don't say, but I'd also have to assume that they weren't doing the same things to the "blank" and control colonies (both technically controls, and definitely not a large enough number of them, but I digress...)

That alone is going to amazingly disruptive. Bees don't like that sort of thing. We had dozens of hives on our farm when I was a kid, and if you want a hive to be nonproductive, there's nothing that will work like disturbing them all the time. Just approaching the hives a lot when they don't know you (and they do, given time), will cause them to quit making honey, much less popping the top off and fumbling around in there.

Properly done, the experiment would have put the phones outside the hives and had some means for controlling and charging them at a distance. On top of which, the experimenters should not KNOW which phones are operating and which are not. And you should have maybe 50 hives in the experiment, maybe run the thing in more than one locale as well.

This is like a badly done high school science fair setup.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:34 PM
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Correlation is not causation, but it is something to consider. Honey bees are important to our ecology and we do need answers.

I'm just curious about a couple of things. Why couldn't it have been cockroaches? And if it was cockroaches, would we find out that we need cockroaches?



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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This ought to be easily reproducible by several unaffiliated scientists, shouldn't it? It doesn't sound like it's a hard experiment to reproduce.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Illusionsaregrander
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The 1980's is a "long time ago?"

God I must be ancient.

www.newsweek.com...


When China rapidly expanded its pear orchards in the 1980s, it stepped up its use of pesticides, and this age-old system of pollination began to unravel. Today, during the spring, the snow-white pear blossoms blanket the hills, but there are no bees to carry the pollen. Instead, thousands of villagers climb through the trees, hand-pollinating them by dipping "pollination sticks"—brushes made of chicken feathers and cigarette filters—into plastic bottles of pollen and then touching them to each of the billions of blossoms.


Despite your saying 30 years ago was a "long time ago" I am glad you posted that. I wasnt aware the Chinese were manually pollinating their fruit crops.


Actually I thought it was eariler but still before cell phones...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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Originally posted by Ferris.Bueller.II
This ought to be easily reproducible by several unaffiliated scientists, shouldn't it? It doesn't sound like it's a hard experiment to reproduce.


Hopefully if someone DOES repeat it, they'll do so in such a way that produces meaningful data, instead of something as pointless as this.

My kids have done better science fair projects. The bar must be pretty low for "Current Science" to publish articles.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by rhinoceros
 


Very true. But many of the huge monocultures such as grains are pollinated by wind blown pollen.

Our area has a loss of European honey bees, but bumble bees and other pollinators must be around because we still get tomatoes and peppers and other foods from our garden.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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Would you give up your cell phone to save the planet?

Just askin'.



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