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Bananas for Burqa

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 02:08 AM
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I recently had a most unnerving experience here in Toronto. It was a bright sunny day and I went downtown to stroll around the area near Yonge and Bloor. (For people who don't know Toronto, that is sort of the crossroads of Toronto. A busy, bustling area with lots of shops, hotels, condos, and people everywhere.) I was just at Yonge and Bloor waiting for a light to change when along came this lady in a burqa.

What an arresting figure! She was slim and carrying a fashionable handbag. She walked by, crossed the street heading north and soon was gone. She wore a complete black burqa, with just a slit for her eyes. Her eyes were brown and she had nice long eyelashes. The fabric that the burqa was made of was opaque and had a little sheen. I think it might have been silk. She looked hot and I don't mean as in the desert sun. I was very intrigued by her. Dare I say, enticed by her?

Toronto is full of beautiful girls. In the summer, when they are all wearing summer clothing, some of it quite scanty, the scenery can be quite breath taking. Frequently one sees girls wearing the hijab. The hijab looks a little nun like. The girls wearing them are often cute, but the hijab itself is really only cute. The burqa is romance, mystery and intrigue. But it gets worse.

A couple of days later I saw a second girl in a similar stylish looking burqa. The effect on me was similar. I was intrigued. This time I had more of an opportunity to observe her. She, like the other woman I saw was doing nothing in any way out of the ordinary. Only her eyes were exposed to the world. Everything else about her was hidden. Everything about her was left up to the imagination. Every possibility seemed . . . possible. Nothing was declared by her appearance, therefore everything was a possibility, at least in the mind.

Bottom line. Anyone who thinks that the burqa does anything but inflame the male imagination, is kidding themselves. Is it possible that the real purpose of the burqa is the opposite of what we have been told? Is the burqa designed to make the impossible possible?


[edit on 30-5-2010 by ipsedixit]




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 02:32 AM
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Burqas, swim shorts, dresses, all the same concept. Cover up what society has decided to be indecent for exposure.

I'm in K town, 45 min drive from T dot, (
) and Burqas aren't something i come by everyday, although i do see people wearing them.

Its pretty comforting knowing all walks of life and culture are accepted in your local area.

If a Burqa ban came to my area, I would protest it. Just as I would protest a law against women wearing tops. (For freedom, not scenery)



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 02:49 AM
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I really hope this gets put where it belongs, either in the trash or on BTS.

You think your phallic use of banana in the title it cute? Is some how witty and suave? Guess again.

As for women wearing the clothing of their FAITH, their RELIGION, their CULTURE, her PRIDE?

Leave it up to a Western male to think she's really wearing it just to entice him, to be alluring and to use it for egging him on.

I can see the headlines now: 'Man blames rape of woman on her burqa'

I wonder. Do you feel the same when you see a nun?

They're covered up head to toe also...




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by gandhi
 

Toronto is really an international city. "Canadian" culture is represented here of course, but it doesn't dominate the scene, at least on the streets. That day was the first time I had actually seen a woman in a burqa though.

The sight is burned into my mind. She was a very attractive and feminine looking figure. I couldn't really distinguish anything about her physical anatomy, except that she was slim, had brown eyes and long eyelashes. The hem of her burqa flopped around a little as she walked.

I still haven't really assimilated what I saw, but I have an intuition that we in the West may have the burqa all wrong. It might be a more complex thing than we imagine. In some cases it may be more of a door than a wall. The anonymity it gives a woman might create possibilities that are never really talked about, east or west.



[edit on 30-5-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 03:05 AM
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reply to post by silo13
 

Going "bananas" is an old expression. It just expresses enthusiasm.

As far as the rest of your opinions, I'm just writing what I feel, as a human being.

Maybe there should be a TTS, Teeny Top Secret, where attitudinizing adolescents who have just discovered politics could hang out and sneer at other people.



[edit on 30-5-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by silo13
I really hope this gets put where it belongs, either in the trash or on BTS.

You think your phallic use of banana in the title it cute?



I think you are trying to hard to find offense.

...to the point of pretending that you don't know what going bananas for something means.

Seriously, not cool.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 03:32 AM
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That's the reason for the burqa. To entice males. Oh, hidden beauty. Leave everything to the imagination and cause a male to just erupt into sexual desire. Heh.

I suppose it might be like that for some people.

I do recall looking at a woman in Saudi Arabia who was wearing a seemingly hot and cumbersome burqa. Her eyes were, indeed, pretty.

Did I suddenly become attracted to her and want to give her daddy a few camels for her? Nope.

Nice eyes, though.

Beware the pig in the poke. lol

I recall the recent news article about an Arab who married who he thought would be a beautiful woman. Only to find out, not only wasn't she who he thought he was going to marry, but she had a moustache and was ugly.
\
No offense.

But he thought he was going to marry her prettier sister. Ooopps.

Burqas are ugly, as far as I am concerned. They speak to me of oppressed women. I know they speak to others of morals and chasity.

Whatever turns people on, I guess, or turns them off.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 03:58 AM
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I'm sure that after a while,even for me, if I were living in a place where burqas were common, the burqa would have no more impact than a ladies' business suit. I'm glad the first woman I ever saw in a burqa dazzled me, even though she did nothing whatsoever but walk by in the street. She didn't even notice me, but I sure noticed her.

She had an impact, a strong impact. Sir Richard Burton must have had many such feelings the first time he travelled in Arabia. There are few living talismans of the 7th century in our modern world. When we run into them they pack power. That burqa had power, but the shock was that it wasn't the forbidding power of the imams and mullahs that it carried. It was something deeper and stronger and more complex.

I think the mullahs are only the stewards of something they themselves don't comprehend. The lady in the burqa was showing the real power of Islam. It was a nice power, strangely, a beautiful and knowing power. It was a revelation to me. I still haven't got over it.

[edit on 30-5-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:02 AM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


Canada dose not have an official culture, it consists of mostly American culture, which is a large mix of cultures thrown snugly into a mind set.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:07 AM
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Originally posted by gandhi
reply to post by ipsedixit
 


Canada dose not have an official culture, it consists of mostly American culture, which is a large mix of cultures thrown snugly into a mind set.


When you say "official" what do you mean?



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:19 AM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


Hey Ipsedixit,

Here is something that could been seen as government-regulation of cultures; In Canada, the government does not tolerate cultures which openly deny the six million figure of the holocaust.

Any such group would be subject to punishment and harassment by officialdom.

So while there is no official culture - we are a 'cultural mosaic' in Canada - there are certainly cultures which officially are not allowed to express themselves.

Another example is how in Quebec they are banning the Burqa-culture from interacting with officialdom. That culture will not be tolerated; It's official.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:35 AM
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reply to post by Exuberant1
 

Canada is a funny place. It is a culture obsessed with making a good impression on the rest of the world. It's like the good little girl in Sunday school who wants to answer every question perfectly, have her hair tied up in a ribbon, fold her hands on her desk in front of her, have her shoes shined and be clean and pretty and noticed. It is also a culture that is coming down with a sickness. The sickness is feeding and clothing every single last one of the nation's elected representatives, civil servants and all of their relatives . . . and friends in organized crime. It is a culture where everything is decided by grants and oversight committees. It is a country where individualism and expressions of outstanding talent are like boozing and whoring, better indulged in south of the border.

I could go on and on.



[edit on 30-5-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:07 AM
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CUte story somehow.

And now to something completelly different. Muslim girls arent that "different" from Western girls



[edit on 30-5-2010 by Dynamitrios]

[edit on 30-5-2010 by Dynamitrios]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:23 AM
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reply to post by Dynamitrios
 

Enjoyed the photo. Humanity is a wonderful thing. It's great to be alive! People need to lighten up on one another. Life is short.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by Exuberant1
 


...to the point of pretending that you don't know what going bananas for something means. Seriously, not cool.


No? Funny that - I wasn't and am still not pretending.

As for this being a political or a religious issue?

THAT is ignorance at best.

A burqa - worn intentionally to entice males?

Whoa... Sick...


 
reply to post by ipsedixit
 



Maybe there should be a TTS, Teeny Top Secret, where attitudinizing adolescents who have just discovered politics could hang out and sneer at other people.


And if there was, that is exactly where your thread belongs.

In my opinion of course.

peace



[edit on 30-5-2010 by silo13]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by silo13
 


Silo,

You are acting like he said he was 'boners for burqas' instead of 'Bananas for burqas'.

You are also acting like you know the burqa-wearers mentioned in the OP - you don't.

Without your misinterpretations and assumptions you've got nothing to complain about.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 



Is it possible that the real purpose of the burqa is the opposite of what we have been told?


Sometimes. I absolutely despise the concept and the reasoning behind the wearing of the burqa. However, some Muslims don't see it as we do in terms of subjugation and oppression. Instead, they compare a woman in a burqa to 'the pearl inside the oyster.'



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 01:21 PM
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I really enjoyed this thread. I live in Ontario and I would gladly support the Burqa if there was ever a question of banning it in the province/country. Freedom before fashion!



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 07:36 PM
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Stars for you both.

It's very easy to take potshots at another culture without really understanding it from the inside out. I'm sure I've been guilty of it. My first lady in a burqa was a thrilling sight and I don't say that in a vulgar way. She was awesome.

Incidently, I was at a party once given by some wealthy people and the costume theme was the Elizabethan era. Many of them came in clothing which could have been worn at the court of King Henry VIII or that of the Fairie Queene herself.

I want to tell you that clothing packed power. What imposing garments! The dresses were massive, heavy and ornate and so was the clothing worn by important men of the time. The clothing seemed to say "I am a pillar, I am powerful, touch me at your peril."

The burqa seemed to say, "I am not yours, don't trifle with me, I am protected, I am precious to someone." But it also said, "I can operate anonymously."

I would never support a ban on the burqa, troubled though I am by the issuing of fatwah and other violent aspects of Islam. There are too many injunctions to violence in Islam for me.


[edit on 31-5-2010 by ipsedixit]



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