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Leopards and other big cats ARE on the loose in Britain - just don't tell a soul

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 07:13 AM
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Britain was home to many 'exotic' animals before they were hunted to extinction within the Isles. Bears and wolves right down to beavers.

In my neck of the woods (literally) there have been big cat sightings and the thing to remember is that they don't just stay in one area, they can cross many counties as they roam what they consider s their 'territory'.

In the dense forests and woods in my county there are plenty of pickings to be had, huge droves of wild deer for starters. The thing is, considering how many deer there are it is not often that a carcass is found - unless it is on the side of the road after being hit by a lorry.

There is plenty of food available to sustain a big cat population and I have seen both a tan and a black feline in my county, both of which were way to big to be 'kitty' on the loose!




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Hi Gordi...

How are you? thanks for the link.. to be honest I hadn't bothered with the Big Cats in Britain site until I saw one... was utterly amazing.. especially since it was so unexpected... then it was surprising to learn that there are reports from the Southdowns dating back 100 years.. and this one cat had been reported across the downs on successive nights..

It is kinda magical to see, no time to be scared, and it didn't seem that scared of us.. more eyeing each other up... and it was all over in 5-6 seconds..

I used to work with the DoE pushing the MoD to upgrade some of it's facilities it claimed it needed to replicate battle field conditions... or in other words didn't want to spend the cash in treating our armed forces like human beings..

One base hadn't been touched since the late 30's and part of the process was to clear out the thousands of feral cats that had moved in.. Nothing like the Scottish wild cats.. but some quite large vicious little beasts.. so at least I can say to myself that I know the difference between the feral types and this sleek elegant beauty
and I'm really glad you got to see one too


Part of me would have liked to have got a photo to prove they are out there.... but another part is glad I didn't as I fear it may have played into the hands of the H&S bubble wrap the population brigade and led to hunting these animals down.. which in my opinion would remove something really precious from our environment even if they are not natives.. they do make a wonderful addition..

[edit on 30/5/10 by thoughtsfull]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by thoughtsfull
 


I'm doing great thanks!

And well said on the big cat front!


It really does look like they may have been with us here in the UK for many many decades, and apart from a few sheep here and there, they don't appear to be causing too much concern for anyone?

For anyone who hasn't encountered one of these... It's a really strange experience.
Your mind is saying WTF??? and you try so hard to rationalise what you're seeing, by the time you've figured out what's happening - it's all over!

Both of my clearer sightings involved the cats just calmly walking away. (One walked into long grass, and then did a couple of leaps into thicker undergrowth... the tracks in the long grass were about 8"-10" wide!! with the 18" high grass well flattened, until the point where it leaped, where the grass was totally untouched for about 3 or 4 feet! The other was just slinking away across a grassy field)

Wonderful wonderful experiences!

(I loved the description of your dog's reaction btw. I used to have a border collie called SPOT, but not at the time of my sightings!)

G



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Hi Gordi.. Thank you for detailing your experiences with these wonderful beauties.
.

and you are so spot on the with "WTF".. I'm sure even our Collie was "WTF"


But it is nice to know they are spread throughout the isles... at least there is hope at some point some will be able to reproduce and settle here, making these isles their new home..



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


It's weird because I remember a similar thread to this one over a year ago and I looked for the newspaper links then ... but they were nowhere to be found.

I know for a fact that both cases were reported in the local papers and I'm equally as certain that the second story (guy finding paw print in garden planter) even had a photograph of said print. I also recall that they brought in a 'big-cat expert', who confirmed the prints were those of a big-cat ... possibly a panther.

I remember wondering at the time if the stories had been covered up after the event to prevent panic. If that were the case it's seems a little bit stupid to remove them after the papers had been circulated.


Stable doors and horses spring to mind (or should that be panthers and plant pots)


As for my personal opnion I have no doubt whatsoever that these big-cats do indeed exist in our countryside.

Woody


EDIT TO ADD; Hey there Gordi ... long time no type.


[edit on 30-5-2010 by woodwytch]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by woodwytch
 


Hehe
Hi Wytchy!
Very nice to see you again.

Is Fylingthorpe near Fylingdale? If so, I may have a wee link for you... LINK to BEAST article

I was wondering if this could be the same Big Cat story you were referring to earlier?

The Beast of the Bay seems to have been sighted many times in N.Yorks, across many locations too. Fylingthorpe, Sleights, Robinhood bay etc

Don't know if searching for "Beast of the Bay" articles might turn up more info on the sightings you were discussing earlier?

kindest regards,
G



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Great link Gordi ... the locations mentioned in that article would certainly be well within the terratorial *sp range of a big-cat I reckon.

Fylingdale is half way across the moors to Whitby ... and Robin Hood's Bay and Ravenscar are all along the same stretch of coast that are all reached via the moors.

Woody



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by LightFantastic

Originally posted by Merriman Weir
Yes, so am I. Where are all the cats native to Britain that are black?


We don't have any big cats native to Britain.

Are you arguing that the selection pressures on what we call a cat - the domestic / feral, even Scottish Wild cat - would be the same for a big cat, such as a lion?

Domestic cats tend to live with or near humans, big cats would need to avoid humans.




No, they wouldn't be the same, although they'd be similar. If anything, this would suggest - if what you're saying about the colour is true - that smaller species wild species would be more likely to be black as, being lower down the food chain, they'd need to adapt more than something higher up with less natural predators.

Anything to back up your claim of "black is the colour of choice to survive in the UK"? All species have a need to survive and yet there's been very few black animals of any species in the UK.

[edit on 30-5-2010 by Merriman Weir]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:23 AM
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The 'big cat' horse attack i'd mentioned earlier.


There have been recent reports that a Black Puma attacked a horse in Ayrshire. The following article entitled 'Big cat attack on horse puts parents on guard at holiday park' was written by Steven Henry and Julie Anne Barnes for the Daily Mail, 22nd July 2009.

Parents have been warned to be on their guard after police revealed a dangerous big cat is on the loose near a Scottish caravan park.

Officers issued an extraordinary alert after a horse was the victim of a savage attack in the middle of the night.
Source.

I'd forgotten about this happening so near a caravan park, this case could of been so much worse.

[edit on 30/5/2010 by Catch_a_Fire]

[edit on 30/5/2010 by Catch_a_Fire]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Hi Merriman,

I speculated earlier in the thread, that the amount of black-coloured big cat sightings in the UK, could be as a result of the many exotic cats which were released into the wild by collectors, (probably as a result of the 1970's legislation restricting the keeping of dangerous wild animals).
Black "Panther" type cats, because they were rarer in the wild, would have been more desireable to collectors, because of their perceived rarity and exotic value.
The black colour is apparently caused by an excess of Melanin, due to a variance in the animals phenotype in the DNA structure. (Dominant Allelomorph) LINK to relevant Wiki article
This variance can be passed on to the offspring of the black cats (and this has been used for selective breeding of black cats in captivity).
So the cubs of any black cats could inherit the "black" gene phenotype, and pass it on in turn.

I suspect that this could account for the high proportion of black cat sightings made. (A high ratio of black cats in the original population, passing on their black genes to the following generations)

In saying that, it has been noted that black species of leopards do seem to thrive in the darker more densely forested areas, but this would make sense too, because they do utilise "ambush" type hunting behaviours, so being black in a very dark environment could well be an advantage. I can't really see this being the case in the UK however. Unless the "standard" spotted camouflage of leopards and jaguars doesn't work so well against our type of woodland/grassland background?
If this were the case though, I would definitely agree with your earlier question... Where are all the indigenous black species?

Definitely an interesting subject!



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:40 AM
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Originally posted by Merriman Weir
No, they wouldn't be the same, although they'd be similar. If anything, this would suggest - if what you're saying about the colour is true - that smaller species wild species would be more likely to be black as, being lower down the food chain, they'd need to adapt more than something higher up with less natural predators.

Anything to back up your claim of "black is the colour of choice to survive in the UK"? All species have a need to survive and yet there's been very few black animals of any species in the UK.

[edit on 30-5-2010 by Merriman Weir]


Im going to take a wild guess that you arent British. Domestic sized cats dont have predators over here and tend to be randonly coloured, even from the same litter. Feel free to go ahead and explain how a big cat would have even similar selection pressures as a domestic cat.

You don't seem to understand what I said which was 'possibly black is the colour of choice for big cats to survive over here' as a conjecture. There could be upteem reasons why mainly black cats are seen. The colour of any other animal, even domestic cats, has nothing to do with big cats. Nothing at all.


[edit on 30/5/2010 by LightFantastic]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to [url=http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread576600/pg1#pid8902618]Leopards and other big cats ARE on the loose in Britain - just don't tell a soul/url]
 


Ok I won't tell anyone, happy?



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


Hi Catch a Fire!

I'd forgotten about that Ayrshire horse attack! (The location is only about 40 miles from where I am)
It caused quite a stir up here at the time.
Thanks for the reminder! (and... poor horse!)
How hungry would a puma have to be to attack a horse??

I noticed, that there is a slight inconsistency in the story quoted, as there have not actually been any confirmed cases of a black coloured "puma" before. (There have been sightings of black puma-like animals, which may be mis-identifications of other species known to have black variants.)
In this particular case, it's probably just a typing error, as deeper in the body of text it does say that a "sandy" coloured big cat, probably a puma, had been spotted in the area earlier.
There are definitely black leopards and jaguars, but not AFAIK any puma/cougar/mountain lions.

Thanks again!
G



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by SugarCube
Britain was home to many 'exotic' animals before they were hunted to extinction within the Isles. Bears and wolves right down to beavers.


You left out dragons and other "dinosaurs".


Originally posted by SugarCubeIn my neck of the woods (literally) there have been big cat sightings and the thing to remember is that they don't just stay in one area, they can cross many counties as they roam what they consider s their 'territory'.


Thanks Mr. Obvious. Did you know that birds can cross many countries too. It's an amazing thing to watch, those animals crossing many countries...

[edit on 30-5-2010 by Oriclan]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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Hi gordi and thanks, its nice to know my posts get read lol.

Ive had an interest in these 'big cat' sightings since my teens, but i wasn't aware of just how many sightings are recorded in scotland. I used to travel up to stranraer about four times a year fishing and after asking a local if it'd be safe to leave the tent setup while we went away to fish (we had concerns as there was a homeless guy who used to walk by regular), he said " he's no bother, its the big cat thats around that should worry you". Apparently a few locals had claimed to of seen it, it was after this when i started to look into scottish 'big cats'.

Another ayreshire story for you to get your teeth into.


ON January 16 at 11.30pm, security officer John Golder was patrolling the Manse Estate in Galston, Ayrshire, when he suddenly spotted a large animal he thought resembled a cat.
Source.

It seems like ayreshire has a resident 'big cat', these stories could be linked there is only a couple of year between the incidents.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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I wonder just how many of these cat sighting go unreported?

I forgot to mention, when I reported my niece's sighting to the big cat man, he reckoned they were mother and cub because they'd been spotted together a number of times in the Cupar, Fife area. One of them being a juvenile. There have been a few stories in the local papers too over the years. One I remember but can't find was a sighting of a large, black, strange-looking "beastie" by a woman walking her dog.

Another interesting story from Cupar here, this is just up the road from me. Poor deer, but that's nature for you.

darrennaish.blogspot.com...



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by Oriclan

Originally posted by SugarCube
Britain was home to many 'exotic' animals before they were hunted to extinction within the Isles. Bears and wolves right down to beavers.


You left out dragons and other "dinosaurs".


Originally posted by SugarCubeIn my neck of the woods (literally) there have been big cat sightings and the thing to remember is that they don't just stay in one area, they can cross many counties as they roam what they consider s their 'territory'.


Thanks Mr. Obvious. Did you know that birds can cross many countries too. It's an amazing thing to watch, those animals crossing many countries...

[edit on 30-5-2010 by Oriclan]


Well it looks like you're off to a 'good' start here at ATS


Not sure why you feel the need for sarcasm in reply to this post ... you do realize that there really were bears and wolves in the British Isles way back don't you ?

You could soon confirm that as a fact if you bothered to do even the tiniest bit of research ... maybe if you'd paid closer attention at school you wouldn't have made yourself look silly.

And I'm not sure what your comment about birds crossing counties is all about ... this thread is about big-cats and their terratorial *sp range ... try to stay on topic or you won't last too long on ATS ... manners cost nothing !

Woody



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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Originally posted by woodwytch
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


It's weird because I remember a similar thread to this one over a year ago and I looked for the newspaper links then ... but they were nowhere to be found.


Ive found the story i was referring to earlier.


On June 9, 2004, the Gazette & Herald based in North Yorkshire ran a story about a big cat that was knocked down and killed close to RAF Fylingdales.
Source.

There are some other interesting reports to be found within the link....enjoy



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


Thank-you for that I was beginning to think I'd dreampt it.


I always suspected that it was the MOD Police ... I don't know if you've ever crossed the moors passed Fylingdales but there are MOD trespass notices for miles (it's quite a place). And a lot of the place is below ground ... maybe they took the carcass there


But that still wouldn't explain why it was covered-up. Plus that's the only road across the moors so there are quite a few vehicles that use it ... I'm sure there must have been a few witnesess passing by.

My guess is the cat was either going to ... or coming up from the beck (stream), which is set in a bit of a hollow ... that the old stone bridge spans ... it's right on a bend in the road in front of RAF Fylingdales which is set back off the road.

Very interesting. Woody



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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I know the area well, ive took that road so many times. Theres a good spot to park, right near the 'hole of horkum' (think thats how its spelt).
Any 'big cat' would be able to disappear quite easily in this area, theres acres of moorland and countless sheep, rabbit and hares all of which would make ideal prey for these cats.

There was also mention of the 'big cat' in question maybe being hit by a bus, if this is the case there were more than likely passengers on this bus giving room for more witness's.




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