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Dutch company glad to help out in the Gulf of Mexico

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posted on May, 28 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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Dutch company glad to help out in the Gulf of Mexico


www.rnw.nl

The Netherlands has finally been asked to help clear up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Oil spill specialists Koseq have been waiting to get the go ahead for a month. Meanwhile British oil company BP is trying to stop the leak with a 'top kill' procedure.

The Dutch company Koseq has been asked by the US to construct two sweeping arms, which will be used to clear the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico. At the same time another six sweeping arms are being sent to the US from Europe.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 28 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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Kodeq has had to wait a long time to get the job and had even started constructing the two sweeping arms. Now that it has been given the order, the gear will be flown out as soon as possible.

Huge job
It is a huge job, says Ary van den Adel of Koseq. You can never clear all the oil, but you can get rid of the sludge on the surface. The two enormous sweeping arms on both sides of a ship literally sweep the oil into one area, where it is then pumped on board. Oil screens, like the ones the Americans are currently using, do not work. Especially when the weather is bad. Mr Van den Andel:

"These arms have proved themselves in large spills, like the one from the oil tanker Erica off France and the Prestige off Spain in 2002. Those are our best examples of what the arms can do."


I am actually quite surprised that it took so long. About three weeks ago I watched a reportage about this company on TV in which they hoped to get the green light to help the US to clear up the oil spill. The CEO of the company stressed that the floating oil booms that are currently being used by the US are outdated and that these sweeping arms could do the job more effectively and faster.

Just like with the Katrina hurricane... Most of you probably don't know about the flood disaster that struck the Netherlands in 1953 and killed thousands of people, but it has contributed to our experience in 'water management'. We know how to deal with flooding and more importantly, we have learned how to protect ourselves from it (with the Delta Works - one of the modern world wonders - being the most prominent example). However, when Dutch companies offered their help in the aftermath of Katrina, it took months for the US to allow them to come.

Why waiting for weeks to permit foreign help? This is not exactly how damage control works.

www.rnw.nl
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 28-5-2010 by Mdv2]



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 04:28 PM
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To give you a better understanding of how it works.



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Mdv2
However, when Dutch companies offered their help in the aftermath of Katrina, it took months for the US to allow them to come.

Why waiting for weeks to permit foreign help? This is not exactly how damage control works.


Well two things.

1) Its not personal. It takes the US months to do anything about virtually anything.

2) You have to wonder if damage control is really the point sometimes. For all we know this is being eyed as an unexpected boon by the PTB. Its at the very least another black hole to throw tax dollars down. Maybe destroying the environment is a good economic stimulus. Only time will tell.

Oh, and thirdly, thank goodness for the Dutch and their giant sweeping arms. Lets hope the government officials dont figure out a way to screw up a good thing.



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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I remember when a group from the Netherlands offered to come over after the storm and help build a dam that would end ever having to worry about New Orleans flooding again. We refused them.

Sometimes I think it's just pride, (false pride and stubborness), but in that case I though it was because the government didn't want to spend the money one of their very sophisticated designs would require.

I hope this is actually true.
We need all the help we can get on this one.



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by Mdv2
I am actually quite surprised that it took so long. About three weeks ago I watched a reportage about this company on TV in which they hoped to get the green light to help the US to clear up the oil spill. The CEO of the company stressed that the floating oil booms that are currently being used by the US are outdated and that these sweeping arms could do the job more effectively and faster.

Why waiting for weeks to permit foreign help? This is not exactly how damage control works.


It's executing a purchase order for a foreign product if I understand the article correctly. I'm not sure I'd exactly call that "foreign help", it's more like "you give us money and we're glad to help you by selling you our product". However I agree the sweeping arm looks much more effective than the floating oil booms I've seen being used by the US.

I don't know why it took them so long to place this order, it's almost like the "deer in the headlights" syndrome. Why doesn't a deer get out of the way of an oncoming car? Paralyzed by fear? Or distracted by other priorities?

I know nothing seems to be happening fast enough for us who see these huge volumes of oil leaking out constantly.



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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Your thread title is misleading. The company isn't GLAD to help, they are glad to make money. Your title leaves a bias that all Americans are greed ridden.



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by mnmcandiez
 


And lets not forget, its BRITISH petroleum that should be buying the arms anyway.

Technically speaking, that is.



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