It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Oil Spill: "LA Wetlands Will Be Washed Away"

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:14 PM
link   

As a native of New Orleans and someone who lived there for 30 years, I feel compelled to comment on the BP oil spill. The only problem is, I’m not really sure what I want to say about it. So, I’ll start with a couple of quotes from people close to me who still live down there in the Big Easy and see where that takes us.

My father, who is also an economist, was born in New Orleans and has lived there most of his life. Yesterday he sent me the following message:

Even if the oil leak stopped today, the existing slick will continue to go ashore. Grass and birds and oysters and shrimp will continue to die. When the grass dies, the barrier islands will be washed away, and the wetlands will wash away too. The LA wetlands will be entirely gone by November 2011. In 2012, New Orleans will be destroyed by a hurricane.


Full article here.

In another part of the article, some activist who helped with Katrina cleanup says it may take years before the full consequences of the oil spill come to light.

Incredible -- this may well turn out to be the greatest disaster of the 21st century.




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:20 PM
link   
reply to post by sylvie
 


I don't think this will be the greatest.

I'm inclined to believe things are going to get much worse.

[edit on 27/5/10 by MikeboydUS]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:30 PM
link   
Polluted water and air, genetically altered food, everything in which man needs to survive will eventually kill us. The enemy is here and it is us.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by sylvie

The LA wetlands will be entirely gone by November 2011. In 2012, New Orleans will be destroyed by a hurricane.


Hardliner absolutist predictions like this, especially when they contain dates, are hard to take seriously. Didn't the crystal ball tell the exact day the hurricane in 2012 will make landfall?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:31 PM
link   
Thats just amazing how easy it is to destroy these things.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 09:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Originally posted by sylvie

The LA wetlands will be entirely gone by November 2011. In 2012, New Orleans will be destroyed by a hurricane.


Hardliner absolutist predictions like this, especially when they contain dates, are hard to take seriously. Didn't the crystal ball tell the exact day the hurricane in 2012 will make landfall?


Did you read the article? He says the wetlands and barrier islands -- which are going to be destroyed by the oil -- have been buffer zones against hurricanes. So the next big one (whether in 2012 or whenever) may very well wipe out New Orleans.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 09:37 PM
link   
reply to post by sylvie
 


Didn't need to read the article. I know what vegetation does for coastlines that depend on them.

But when you speak in a matter of fact manner, about things like natural disasters in the years ahead, you lose all credibility. You become just another in an endless woodwork churning of doomongers.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 09:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by sylvie[/i The LA wetlands will be entirely gone by November 2011. In 2012, New Orleans will be destroyed by a hurricane.



Having been through many Hurricanes, I would say that this is unlikely.

Those storms are so fierce that the wetlands don't slow them down much if at all. Hurricanes have to travel over solid land for a good while before they are that effected by the land. I think it may help to slow them to a tiny extent but that's all. and those Islands are very tiny compared to a hurricane.

During Katrina, the water in homes close to the lake ( the farthest area from the gulf) was around 3 to 31/2 feet up the wall. Even if a hurricane did twice the amount of damage that Katrina did, it would not utterly destroy the city.

It would be very bad, a lot will get destroyed but perhaps not as much as Katerina because tons of people rebuilt better to withstand hurricane effects. But wipe out the city, I don't believe that.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:27 PM
link   
Had someone I know say he did not believe it when I mentioned Carville's comments on the oil leak. I knew he would not watch the video so I found the transcript here: Source: newsbusters.org...

A transcript of the May 26 segment, which aired at 7:06am EDT, follows:

"STEPHANOPOULOS: You know, the White House denies any political motivation here. But, immigration and this oil spill have become two, big political headaches for the administration. So, let's bring in our political strategist, James Carville, worked for Bill Clinton. Matthew Dowd, pollster for George W. Bush, also some Democrats, as well. And, James, let's begin with the oil spill. Last week, even though you're an ally of President Obama, you blasted the White House. Said it was a lackadaisical response, said they were naive for trusting BP. And you went on to say that this is a disaster of the first magnitude. They have got to go to Plan B. Are we seeing Plan B now?

JAMES CARVILLE: Man, I hope so, George. Because, the political stupidity is unbelievable. Here, you have a situation, where you have some working- 11 working- hard-working people, blown up as the result of corporate malfeasance and maybe criminal negligence, as a result of inept bureaucrats who were part of the- you can actually blame the previous administration for this. And the President doesn't get down here in the middle of this. This thing should be- his approval should be up seven points right now if he had come down. I have no idea of why they didn't seize this thing. I have no idea of why their attitude was so hands-off-y here. It's just unbelievable. Now, I hope he sees it now, because very seldom do you get good politics and the really the right thing to do. And that is to get involved here.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Well, the President is going down on Friday. He's announcing these tighter new regulations on Thursday. Matthew Dowd, you lived through Katrina with President Bush. What we are seeing now, for the first time on this issue, a majority disapprove of how he's handling it. But, do you see this posing a Katrina-like threat, political threat to President Obama?

MATTHEW DOWD: Well, I think this incident that happened, the environmental disaster that happened, is another example for the American public that they can't trust corporations and big government to protect them. And I think ultimately, it will be a real political problem. It hasn't affected his numbers yet. But, James is right. In a disaster like this, his numbers should be going up. Not just staying stagnant. And, ultimately, I think the country right now is so frustrated on a lot of things. This is just another example where they say, "What is government doing? And what can they do well?" We have disasters. And we're seeming to be on Plan G "

STEPHANOPOULOS: But, let me ask both of you this: What more can the President do here? He didn't-

CARVILLE: George! George! George! The President of the United States could have come down here. He could have been involved with the families of these 11 people. He could have commandeered the things. We could have sent the Woods Hole people. He could have sent the Scripps on research vessels in the Gulf of Mexico. He could have implemented a plan in anticipation of this. You know, right, he can't exactly fill the hole up. Last night I was on Larry King, the CEO, the former CEO of the Shell. They said they got 85 percent of the stuff cleaned up in the Gulf of Saudi Arabia. He could be commandeering tankers and making BP bring tankers in and clean this up. They could the deploying people to the coast right now. He could be deploying people to the coast. He could be with the corps of engineers and the Coast Guard with these people in Plaquemines Parish, doing something about these regulations. These people are crying. They're begging for something down here. And it just looks like he's not involved in this! Man, you have got to get down here and take control of this! Put somebody in charge of this and get this thing moving! We're about to die down here! "
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The rest of the interview was about immigration matters.

Anyways, after seeing the article, the guy said nothing other than I'll be damn, Carville is a real Cajun.


Thanks for speaking up James. The country appreciates it.






[edit on 27-5-2010 by manta78]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:47 PM
link   
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Are you refuting the fact that barrier islands (and specifically wetlands) act as protection for the coastline? I'd like to see some science behind that please.


Before you ignore my question and ask me for proof that they do: There is an equation for X number of miles of wetland/per ft of storm surge. Usually 2-4 linear miles to reduce the storm surge of 1 ft. citation

The 'chicken little' is mostly right.

(had to change who the post was addressed to)

[edit on 27-5-2010 by beaverg]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by beaverg
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Are you refuting the fact that barrier islands (and specifically wetlands) act as protection for the coastline? I'd like to see some science behind that please.


Before you ignore my question and ask me for proof that they do: There is an equation for X number of miles of wetland/per ft of storm surge. Usually 2-4 linear miles to reduce the storm surge of 1 ft. citation

The 'chicken little' is mostly right.

(had to change who the post was addressed to)

[edit on 27-5-2010 by beaverg]


I don't need any science.. I have seen too many hurricanes plow right over them without making enough of an impact. Many many times it doesn't slow the hurricane down. You can see this for yourself by watching satellite and radar feeds of hurricanes going over them. Sure, the do help break up the tidal surge, but they don't have the impact to keep a big hurricane from destroying the city, as the OP claims.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:15 PM
link   
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


You're right about that. They aren't "speed bumps" that cause the storm itself to lose "considerable energy". But we can't neglect the importance these wetlands play in reducing the distance a storm surge can penetrate the main coastline. I skimmed over the article so I missed the key words I put in quotes up there.



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join