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Was the war on terror passed by Congress?

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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I'm having trouble finding a direct answer. I'm pretty sure it wasn't, but I'm looking for a source and am having a bit of trouble. So, did Congress approve the war on terror?


How about the war in Iraq?




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by The_Zomar
So, did Congress approve the war on terror?


Ultimately, YES.

Though, here are some rather interesting propositions, Congressional "votes" and timelines leading up to such.



Vote charts
Two handy charts that provide a quick run-down of these votes:
House votes on the Iraq War
Senate votes on the Iraq War


Hope this helps.


Personally, I find them quite interesting, insightful and all too "telling" ... especially with regards the multiple "Fails" prior to damned near unanimous agreeance for the same. ?
?

hmmm....

[edit: to add]


October 10, 2002 - FAILED- Urges the president to use diplomacy and work through the United Nations rather than launching a military strike against Iraq.



October 10, 2002 - FAILED - Requires the president to obtain congressional approval before using military force against Iraq if a United Nations resolution could not be obtained.



October 10, 2002 - FAILED - Recommits the resolution with instructions requiring the president to submit to Congress an estimate of the impact of the war on the U.S. economy, Iraqi citizens, and international stability.



October 11, 2002 - PASSED - Authorizing the president to use military force in order to defend the national security of the U.S. against Iraq.

(*personal commentary*: "to defend the national security of the U.S. against Iraq" - ?
? $64,000 question being - and the IMMEDIATE threat WAS!?)

- skipping a couple of PASSED propositions seeking appropriations. -


June 26, 2003 - FAILED - Intelligence appropriations bill for FY 2004. Amendment calling for an audit into all telephone and electronic communications between the CIA and the office of Vice President Cheney on the subject of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

(interesting, HuH!?)


June 26, 2003 - FAILED - Intelligence appropriations bill for FY 2004. Amendment calling for a study into how much intelligence was shared between the Pentagon and U.N. inspectors in the months leading up to the war.

(*even mOatr interesting*)

... and that's just propositions and/or bills put forth in the House.


[edit on 27-5-2010 by 12m8keall2c]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 

From your first link...



H.AMDT.194 to H.R.2417: Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 June 26, 2003

Failed
Intelligence appropriations bill for FY 2004. Amendment calling for an audit into all telephone and electronic communications between the CIA and the office of Vice President Cheney on the subject of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. (more info at full article)

H.AMDT.195 to H.R.2417: Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 June 26, 2003

Failed
Intelligence appropriations bill for FY 2004. Amendment calling for a study into how much intelligence was shared between the Pentagon and U.N. inspectors in the months leading up to the war.(more info at full article)

H.RES.557: War in Iraq Anniversary resolution May 17, 2004
Passed

Allowing for the consideration of rules on a resolution declaring that the U.S. and the world are safer with Saddam Hussein out of power in Iraq. (more info at full article)


I find it interesting that transparency was denied but propaganda, in the face of what was ultimately some faulty intelligence, was approved...

There is most certainly something fishy going on here...and this fish has two hands, legs and can breathe out of water...

[edit on Thu, 27 May 2010 18:37:09 -0500 by MemoryShock]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Thank you so much for the quick reply!


Very informing.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by The_Zomar]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:53 PM
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the war on terror was just a name conjured up to make it seem appealing to us. they probably hired a advertising agency to come up with that name. the real title was: lets squeeze every penny out of their pockets, take away their privacy and bomb somebody for the hell of it because its a waste to throw away old weapons.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by DOADOA
 

Actually, I think the engineering was intended to be a bit more functional than that. I have a theory that many of the lower scale wars (relative to the World Wars and perhaps to an extent including them) were intentionally produced for "in the field" testing of new equipment and applications...

When one considers that September 10th marked an announcement that they had somehow misplaced trillions of dollars and the subsequent over funding of The War in Iraq (which includes huge payouts to Private Corporations) than one can surmise without stretching the rules of logic too much that the reason was definitely for military industrial application and to justify military/defense spending.

I am sure there is a ton of seemingly innocuous information that is barely confidential that could help start putting this story together...or I am stretching it.

However, money and technology keep those in power with power so that is where I look for motive.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:36 PM
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Double Post...

[edit on Thu, 27 May 2010 20:36:31 -0500 by MemoryShock]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by The_Zomar
 



Congress shall have the power to...To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;


~The Constitution for the United States of America, Article I, Section 8, Clause 11~

Congress has not used its sole authority to declare war since June 5th, 1942. Prior to that date, Congress had authorized military conflicts, such as The Quasi-War, The First, and Second Barbary War, among other incursions and excursions, and after June 5th of 1942, Congress has demurred from its sole authority to declare war officially, only relying on the word for its rhetorical power.

As far as the "war on terror" goes, again no official war has been declared by Congress, and the word "war" is used for its rhetorical power, just as the "war on poverty", and the "war on drugs" were not official wars declared by Congress but clear and present wars nonetheless. The "war on poverty", "war on drugs", and now the "war on terror" have been unofficial wars undeclared by Congress and waged upon the people of The United States of America. The so called "war on poverty" created a massive welfare system that created contractual relationships between many of the people and the expanding federal government. The so called "war on drugs" has been the primary reason that The U.S. now imprisons more people than any other industrialized nation, and has in prison numbers that exceed the Soviet Union at the height of its dictatorship, and while much rhetoric is levied against China for its human rights violations, China now does not imprison as many people the U.S. does.

The wars that are fought today are rhetorical wars used to justify the expansion of the federal government and its imprudent imperialist policies, while incrementally using these wars to erode the inalienable rights of the very people the were entrusted to protect those rights.



[edit on 27-5-2010 by Jean Paul Zodeaux]




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