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Census workers can enter your apartment in your absence

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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This story seems weak at best. I never even heard of a Census worker asking for entrance to someones apartment or home. Usually they conduct their business at the door or over the phone. There are certain places census works might go to get counts (flop houses, shelters, etc) where they might need to get access to collect their data. Did this actually happen, or is this a hypothetical?




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 




can enter your apartment in your absence

in order to count persons in the abode


I stand in awe of the intellectual prowess of those who make our laws.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by vesta
 


Ha I actually brought my toothbrush to work today. I usually have one at work, but I dropped it the other day. I usually play by the 5 second rule, but salvaging a wet tooth brush from the bathroom floor isn't worth it


In Oregon, a tenant must be given at least a 24 hour advance notice (in writing or verbally) when a landlord or repair men would be entering the premises. I've rented a number of houses and apartments and always received notice.


If a landlord enters the property without following these rules, a tenant can sue and ask for damages caused by the entry or one month's rent, whichever is more.


The laws vary by state, but I would be surprised if not every state has a similar statute protecting a renter's privacy.

edit: I do think they can legally enter your yard, both back and front. But I've never read the statues regarding the matter.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by JohnnyTHSeed]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Where is the proof?

All we have is one guy stating something.

Unfortunately, even though it makes no sense and has been cleared up by a census worker, we still have a thread full of people buying this sad tale.

What in the article is supposed to be convincing, exactly?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by JohnnyTHSeed
reply to post by vesta
 


Ha I actually brought my toothbrush to work today. I usually have one at work, but I dropped it the other day. I usually play by the 5 second rule, but salvaging a wet tooth brush from the bathroom floor isn't worth it


In Oregon, a tenant must be given at least a 24 hour advance notice (in writing or verbally) when a landlord or repair men would be entering the premises. I've rented a number of houses and apartments and always received notice.


If a landlord enters the property without following these rules, a tenant can sue and ask for damages caused by the entry or one month's rent, whichever is more.


The laws vary by state, but I would be surprised if not every state has a similar statute protecting a renter's privacy.

edit: I do think they can legally enter your yard, both back and front. But I've never read the statues regarding the matter.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by JohnnyTHSeed]


I live in Oregon as well, and in an emergency or criminal situatin. a landlord does not have to give 24 hour notice. They only must notify that they did enter.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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Um did anyone read this article?

NOT ONE WORD about being able to enter your home in your absence.\

Something is absent in this blog article, and it is a connection between title and article.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by hotbakedtater
 



What many Americans don’t realize, is that census workers — from the head of the Bureau and the Secretary of Commerce (its parent agency) down to the lowliest and newest Census employee — are empowered under federal law to actually demand access to any apartment or any other type of home or room that is rented out, in order to count persons in the abode and for “the collection of statistics.” If the landlord of such apartment or other leased premises refuses to grant the government worker access to your living quarters, whether you are present or not, the landlord can be fined $500.00. That’s right — not only can citizens be fined if they fail to answer the increasingly intrusive questions asked of them by the federal government under the guise of simply counting the number of people in the country; but a landlord must give them access to your apartment whether you’re there or not, in order to gather whatever “statistics” the law permits.


Same Source

Did you read the article?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by howmuch4another
 


Not a moral stance. I agree with you too a point. I would be carrying if someone came into my apartment. I am fairly certain that you can get charged with a crime if you point a gun at someone without there being imminent threat.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Raustin
 


got it. to be fair there have been alot of horror stories of violence against the census workers too.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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Originally posted by Raustin
reply to post by howmuch4another
 


Not a moral stance. I agree with you too a point. I would be carrying if someone came into my apartment. I am fairly certain that you can get charged with a crime if you point a gun at someone without there being imminent threat.


imminent threat?

they are in your home uninvited...



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by LurkerMan
 


Ruastin was responding to my post which I posited inviting them in...



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:46 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by vesta

Originally posted by CanadianDream420
How can they determine how many people live in a residence if no one is home?.. lol


By counting the toothbrushes...........no-one takes them to work!!


Another question - How would they get in if they did not have a key???


Rented property. There will be a landlord with a key.


Not necessarily my friend!

When you change the locks yourself



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by ISHAMAGI
 


You will probably be evicted if you change the locks yourself. The landlord needs to be able to get in if your pipes start leaking etc. and your not home. Still chaps my a though.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by howmuch4another
 


I would suggest in that situation then to simply carry your weapon (not pointed at them, but in a safe direction and finger off the trigger), if a long gun, or holstered if a handgun. It would be easily and quickly accessible as you continually assess the person. When you answer, if they ask, you can just say you were just about to clean/function check your weapon, or practicing some home defense drills. No threat, and any sane person wouldn't want to sneeze in your presence.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by Wolf321
 


yep agreed. thanks. I guess that's the "long and short" of it.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:10 PM
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This is a HOAX rumor.

The real facts are here:

2010 Census.gov

"Most importantly, the Census Bureau will NEVER, under any circumstances, ask to enter your home."



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by howmuch4another
Just a question for the law enforcement folks on here.
If a census worker demands entry into my house and I let them in willingly am I allowed to keep the little red dot from my .40SW trained on them the whole time they walk around or is that illegal?
Seriously I would like to know that. Thanks.



That is very illegal, "assault by threat" would be the minimal charge.

Secure



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by xXxtremelySecure
 


I was taught never to point my gun at anything I did not intend to KILL.

But hey, if he says he is a safe gun owner...whatever.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:07 PM
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The only source is a blog by Bob Barr (which is sited) for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Barr is a recognized name in the Tea Party movement, which is against the Census to begin with. No references to any statute or law in the original article, and as we've seen here, a census worker has already cleared this issue up. This is just an example of reactionary right-wing propaganda.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 

as a census employee i can tell you that is a blatant lie we cannot enter anyone's home even with their permission I don't know where you got that information but it's wrong



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