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Census workers can enter your apartment in your absence

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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Census workers can enter your apartment in your absence


Link here
[For some reason ATS garbled the link the first time I posted it, so I have edited it as above. It's from the the newsaper "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" (a columnist's blog section).]

...What many Americans don’t realize, is that census workers — from the head of the Bureau and the Secretary of Commerce (its parent agency) down to the lowliest and newest Census employee — are empowered under federal law to actually demand access to any apartment or any other type of home or room that is rented out, in order to count persons in the abode and for “the collection of statistics.”
(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 5/27/10 by silent thunder]




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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Privacy protection at its finest, folks.

Oh, by the way, if you are a renter and your landlord refuses to allow the census workers to enter your apartment, he/she is subject to a fine.

Perhaps when going out, one could leave the some fava beans and a nice chianti on the counter thoughtfully, as it were, for any unexpected guests that show up in one's absence?

Link here
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 5/27/10 by silent thunder]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:11 PM
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How can they determine how many people live in a residence if no one is home?.. lol



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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I was going to ask the same thing about the absence part, that doesn`t jive. I`ll ask my daughter about this one in the morning, before we put flowers on the graves.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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There's two things here:

1)An apartment or rented rom is not the property of the tenent. Therefore, they do not need the tennets permission to enter, at any time, as long as they have the permission of the property management.

2)I bet the first time a census worker gets buckshot embedded in his stomache because soemone thinks he is an intruder, this will be looked at more closely.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:28 PM
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If I ever come home and find someone in my apartment they will most likely end up in the hospital. I hope no over eager census workers actually enter someones residence and get themselves shot or beat half to death.

Census worker: 'Stop hitting me, I'm a census worker!'

Raustin: 'I know!'



[edit on 27-5-2010 by Raustin]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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Ya right! First off, if the government told some silly part-time, half-trained census worker to enter a home by force and anybody got hurt, imagine the liability/workers comp/etc, etc.

No way, any employer advises their lowest paid subordinate to do something like this!

Don't forget, employers are not primarily concerned with what they "can" do, they are primarily concerned with what they can be sued for! Asset protection rules!! Insurance companies rule!! This is a "corporate" government in all aspects of the word.

Now, on a side note, let some punk try to force their way into my home to see how many people live upstairs.

There might be one less person to count.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Just a question for the law enforcement folks on here.
If a census worker demands entry into my house and I let them in willingly am I allowed to keep the little red dot from my .40SW trained on them the whole time they walk around or is that illegal?
Seriously I would like to know that. Thanks.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by CanadianDream420
How can they determine how many people live in a residence if no one is home?.. lol


By counting the toothbrushes...........no-one takes them to work!!


Another question - How would they get in if they did not have a key???



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by vesta

Originally posted by CanadianDream420
How can they determine how many people live in a residence if no one is home?.. lol


By counting the toothbrushes...........no-one takes them to work!!


Another question - How would they get in if they did not have a key???


Rented property. There will be a landlord with a key.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by howmuch4another
 


No, you're not. Don't point a gun at someone unless they are a genuine threat to life and limb. I am hoping you were joking, if not you shouldn't own a gun.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by Raustin]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:37 PM
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So long as they cook you dinner while they are there, I have no problem with this


As another poster said, a tenant does not own the property, the apartment leasing company does. So, as long as they have the apartment's permission, they can gain access. I also don't see how that allows them to count occupants. what are they going to do, check the underwear drawer?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:40 PM
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I thought you guys had that rule that they can't enter without a warrant??
No warrant??
Just tell them to get out or they will be dealt some heavy handed justice.
It is your right is it not???



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Well I think the issue with that is that you do not own your apartment as so many have stated. I don't believe this would fall under illegal search and seizure. It probably should though.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

1)An apartment or rented rom is not the property of the tenent. Therefore, they do not need the tennets permission to enter, at any time, as long as they have the permission of the property management.


I don't know how it is in every state, but most of the states I've lived in there are things called, "renter's rights." One of those rights, again in places I've lived, only allows the owner to enter without notifying the renter in the case of an emergency(i.e. a pipe burst while you were away and is threatening the ceiling of the apartment under you.) Otherwise , in the instance where it isn't an emergency, then the owner must give written notice in the state of Ca at least 24hrs in advance. I don't really know if the census bureau trumps these laws, so it would be interesting if someone who is in law enforcement can back this up.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
So long as they cook you dinner while they are there, I have no problem with this


As another poster said, a tenant does not own the property, the apartment leasing company does. So, as long as they have the apartment's permission, they can gain access. I also don't see how that allows them to count occupants. what are they going to do, check the underwear drawer?


Poor soul if they were a cross dresser.............

In all seriousness so sad that they can violate your lives - people are waking up!



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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Actually I went to an orientation for this specific job and they specifically mentioned that you cannot enter someones residence if no one answers the door, nor can you enter fenced off homes w/ out permission from the residence. They mentioned you'd instantly be terminated and barred from ever returning to the job if you did. So I'm not sure what they're talkin about..



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by Raustin
 


Well here in Canada,we have to give 24hrs notice before entering unless it is an emergency.
I don't see census workers as an immediate emergency whatsoever.
I run buildings for a living and I have a residential building as well.
I would not comply based on how I do things on a regular basis.

I am accountable to the people and have to live as such and i would hope more landlords have this attitude.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by Raustin
 


nope not joking and probably the safest gun owner you don't know. but thanks for the judgement. Have you caught any of the horror stories of some of these census takers? My point is that you don't know if they are a threat or not. One minute their back is to you the next they may brandish a firearm of their own. Me thinks it naive to simply trust them. Do you know for a fact the answer to my question or is that a moral stance of yours? No problem if it is I am just looking for the answer.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by crafty_gnome

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

1)An apartment or rented rom is not the property of the tenent. Therefore, they do not need the tennets permission to enter, at any time, as long as they have the permission of the property management.


I don't know how it is in every state, but most of the states I've lived in there are things called, "renter's rights." One of those rights, again in places I've lived, only allows the owner to enter without notifying the renter in the case of an emergency(i.e. a pipe burst while you were away and is threatening the ceiling of the apartment under you.) Otherwise , in the instance where it isn't an emergency, then the owner must give written notice in the state of Ca at least 24hrs in advance. I don't really know if the census bureau trumps these laws, so it would be interesting if someone who is in law enforcement can back this up.


You are correct, there are renter's rights. however, and I will preface this by saying I am not versed in census law, but I do believe taht if a law is being broken(and as I understand it, not participating in census is now a crime) the landlord can grant access without notice.



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