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Hypersonic aircraft shatters aviation records

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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www.msnbc.msn.com...


blog.seattlepi.com

The Air Force tests an unmanned X-51 WaveRider off the coast near Point Mugu. Launched from a B-52 bomber, it hits 3,500 mph and travels for 200 seconds before plunging into the ocean as planned
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
blog.seattlepi.com
www.msnbc.msn.com

[edit on 27-5-2010 by KyoZero]




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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Well they did it! Mach 5 and 200 seconds worth of amazing flight. They did admit it flew shorter than expected but for the maiden this is really wild news! I am always fascinated in my Air Force but more so in new technology. So now I wonder what they will do with this?

I couldn't fathom doing 3500 MPH let alone the 4200 MPH they were hoping for.

Much like the X-1 this was dropped by a bomber although this was unmanned

-Kyo

blog.seattlepi.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 27-5-2010 by KyoZero]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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I still don't understand why Anti-Gravity (to the public knowledge at least) still isn't being implimented.

Instead of burning fuel getting from A-B they simply tap-into the electomagnetic field of Earth, and use the reversal hypothesis to propel the craft against the rotation of Earth without ever having to burn fuel doing so, you can "hover" whilst going against the earths rotational speed, and travel against the rotational axis at 108000 km/h (although restricted in a East-West direction unless they somehow use counterbalances.)



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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"I still don't understand why Anti-Gravity (to the public knowledge at least) still isn't being implimented."

If you want to dig down that rabbit hole you're going to need some biological level 4 protection and a metric tonne of sodium pentathol. Endless information, disinformation...for at least a century.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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That is really a pretty amazing feat. I wonder how soon they will be able to implement the kind of technology it takes to go this fast into military aircrafts



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by KyoZero
 


Hey there KyoZero !

Certainly a ground breaking accomplishment . I understand that the temperatures generated inside the scramjet are phenomenal , I wonder how they cope with volcanic ash ....


How long do you think it will be before we see a commercial application ?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by UmbraSumus
 


I miss mutter...haven't talked to you in a while so thanks for stopping by :-p

History of the Jet Engine

According to this the Jet was finally tested in 1936 and flying by the latter days of the war so if we go by that sort of thing maybe we'll see commercial (though I am sure it will be miltary LONG before commercial) over the next 10 years

-Kyo



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 05:38 AM
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reply to post by KyoZero
 


If that's what the site says about the jet engine then is wrong. The first jet was flying before WW2 began and the Italians (sort of) and British were also flying jets before Pearl Harbour happened.

As for your prediction of commercial scramjets in 10 years? Not a chance. Remember what happened to Concorde. A commercial scramjet would be stupidly expensive and completely unprofitable, and that is what counts, not how cool it is.

Actually, just had a look at that site and I see it repeats this, oft trotted out, fallacy.


Ohain later developed an axial flow engine, the beginning of what is now the standard for gas turbine engines.




Germany did not invent the axial engine, despite this common fallacy.

A major engine type of the 1950's and 60's was the Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire, this was also built in the USA as the Wright J-65 and is a very significant and successful axial engine.

Development of this engine began as the Metrovick F.9, this was a development of the Metrovick F.2 which was flying in a Meteor before the wars end and also powered the Saro SR/A.1.

The contract for the development of this engine was granted by the Air Ministry in 1939 and dates back to continuous private research by Alan Griffith over the previous decade, beginning with a paper he published in 1926 which predates both Whittle AND Ohain, who both used centrifuges initially.

Anyhow, on with the true topic now I have that off my chest


[edit on 28-5-2010 by waynos]

[edit on 28-5-2010 by waynos]



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by waynos
 


don't take it out on me...I just posted what I found and made a non-educated guess on the SJ

Admittedly jets are not my expertise

-Kyo



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