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Bone Marrow Transplant cures Compulsive Mice

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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Compulsive Behavior in Mice Cured by Bone Marrow Transplant




Scientists earlier found that mice missing one of a group of core developmental
genes known as the Hox genes developed an odd and rather unexpected pathology: the mutant animals groomed themselves compulsively to the point that they were removing their own hair and leaving self-inflicted open sores on their skin. Now, they've found a surprising connection between the Hoxb8 gene and the behavior that looks an awful lot like that of people with an obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder (OCD).


It turns out that the Hoxb8 gene in question plays an important role in the development of immune cells known as microglia, which reside in the brain. Studies in which the researchers labeled Hoxb8 cells found that they show up in the brain exclusively in bone marrow-derived microglia. When they transplanted healthy bone marrow from control mice into the mutant animals, normal microglia made it to the animals' brains in about four weeks' time and many of the animals then stopped their incessant grooming, allowing their hair to grow back in, within three months of the procedure.




Capecchi now thinks based on the new findings connecting microglia to OCD-like behaviors in mice that the immune cells might not only monitor neural behavior but also modulate it, making sure it doesn't get out of hand. If they can't do their job properly, as in the Hoxb8 mutants, pathologies like the one they've seen in the mice may result.

Capecchi notes that disorders such as depression, autism, Alzheimer's, and OCD do tend to be associated with immune deficiencies. But it wasn't really clear which came first. Genome-wide association studies in schizophrenia and OCD had also turned up genes involved in the immune system. But again, the connection wasn't entirely clear.


Capecchi said he wouldn't suggest a bone marrow transplant as a potential cure for mental disorders in humans today, given the significant risks associated with the procedure. But, as the saying goes, never say never. Perhaps more importantly, he says, scientists still know a lot more about the immune system than they do about the brain. The new discovery suggests treatments "that improve the immune system may have benefits for the brain," he says. "It opens up the spectrum of possibilities you can think about."

www.sciencedaily.com...

[edit on 27/5/10 by sandri_90]




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:09 PM
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well even if this works on humans I just dont see how you could treat 3.5 billion woman for compulsive bathroom time.
Or 3.5 billion woman for the compulsive being an hour late for anything syndrome.
O the once a month every month from the age of 12 till death do you part syndrome . My god did they study how offton they can do this it would probly be many trips per woman to get them cured of everything.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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Originally posted by xxcalbier
well even if this works on humans I just dont see how you could treat 3.5 billion woman for compulsive bathroom time.
Or 3.5 billion woman for the compulsive being an hour late for anything syndrome.
O the once a month every month from the age of 12 till death do you part syndrome . My god did they study how offton they can do this it would probly be many trips per woman to get them cured of everything.




"Nowhere in your incoherent rambling did you even come remotely close to the correct answer. We are all dumber for having heard that. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul."

Sorry, I couldn't resist. But seriously, are you sexist? I think this aritcle pertains to everyone in the world, and I'm not even sure why you would say the things you said.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Amazing how the absence of this single "Hox gene", ends up, having such a big impact on a persons psychology. Because common sence says that if somebody has to compulsively check that the: e.g. gas is off, the door is locked, their hands are clean, ect that the source of the problem is all to do with the strength of their own self-disciplin, towards their own mindset.

How common sence can be wrong!!! (Although I'm obviously "self-disciplin Will Power" must help "fight" the condition.
I wonder: how many, more years, the cure, to this problem will remain a bone marrow transplant (as opposed to say a drug that directly changes the patients DNA)?
And I wonder which other genes have such a marked effect on a persons beahaviours? How many more years until we can buy drug that e.g. "make an idiot an Einstein overnight"? In the Science Fiction people have often imagined that evolution would give people brains twice the size of mellons, but maybe it will be the "drug therapy"

To be honest I'd be surprised if medicine didn't even offer to cure old age itself by the time someone (say, 25 today) is in their 90's? (And to be honest) I'm glad to be alive, to witness this kinda stuff happen.




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